How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE


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100-Word Challenge for Grown-ups – Week #153

To join the fun check out:

http://jfb57.wordpress.com/2014/10/27/100-word-challenge-for-grown-ups-week153/

This week’s prompt is the picture below, plus 100 words

Week 153 100WordChallenge

TOO DIVINE

Can’t do it. A hooded menace clutched his chest, staggered and swayed. Too divine to die. He’d never neglected his duty before.  I’m finished.

 Birdsong ceased. An exquisite melody floated across the meadow. Crowned in daisies, a head of tousled blonde hair bobbed among the wildflowers. The tiny girl gathered blossoms and sang a spellbinding tune.

Grimm ditched his steadfast scythe. One step forward for a better look, hands tucked inside the robe’s sleeves, he closed his eyes. He froze in place and turned to stone. Once obscure among shadows, now visible for all to behold. His punishment for non-compliance.

 

© 2014 TAK


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Shanghai, Day 10, Part 3 – The Old Bazaar and More

Chinese Saying

Keep your belongings in front of you. What’s in front belongs to you; what’s behind, belongs to someone else.

~ * ~

Whenever we left or entered the bus, our tour guides reminded us to check our personal belongings. At first I felt we were being treated like children, but soon realized how easy it is to become engrossed while surrounded by the distractions of China.

OLD SHANGHAI BAZAAR

What luck! Once again, we were given time on our own to explore. After the splendor of the financial district (The Bund), some of our group discovered another world a short distance away.  These are the real people we had little occasion to see. I thank RJ for sharing these wonderful pictures.

More day to day scenes:

THE RITZIER BAZAAR 

While some explored the vibrant open market, others followed Jackie to a more upscale sector where anything from floral teas to pearls, jade, cameras, clothes, emporiums and brand name, best-quality knock-offs were secreted. One adventurous couple in our group was interested in what was on offer. I had no interest in shopping but decided to tag along. Led through masses of humanity, avoiding elbows and bodies, we entered an alley, and a short path to a nondescript door. Jackie must have knocked to gain entry, but I don’t recall. Before he did though, he made sure we were comfortable in finding our way back to the group’s meeting place, and disappeared.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

We entered, were sized up, and asked what was needed. This undertaking felt clandestine. The room was small and windowless. Shelves displayed elegant purses, luggage, watches etc. Like a wolf waiting to pounce, the attendant pushed merchandise on the couple. Nothing suited. How about this? Maybe you’d like that… The room grew smaller and smothering. Eyes on the door, my nerves hummed. Escape wasn’t easy. Finally free, we spoke among ourselves. “Might as well buy a real Rolex for the price they want.”

We hadn’t proceeded farther than a few paces when a young woman dashed up from behind, promising another place; a better deal. She wouldn’t take no for an answer. We kept moving. The whole business became uncomfortable, but at last she melted into the crowd.

As everywhere else, knock-offs are illegal in China. If you are caught, off to the police station you go. Your tour group continues as scheduled and you have to find your way back to them on your own dime. Of course, you don’t get to keep your loot either.

Dinner Sunday night  

  • Tomato soup with egg
  • Rice with egg
  • Lightly breaded white fish
  • Mixed vegetables
  • Greens
  • Eggplant in sauce
  • Beef in sauce
  • Sliced curry potatoes
  • Scrambled eggs
  • Sweet and sour chicken
  • Watermelon slices

SHANGHAI QUICK FACTS:

  • Home of the (open air) Bird’s Nest, capacity 80,000
  • Popular sports: ping pong, table tennis, basketball and soccer
  • World Financial Centre, 2nd tallest in the world
  • Houses used to cost $1,000 / square foot; now up to $5,000 / square foot
  • Kindergarten parents pay about $1,000 per month
  • School free grades 1 to 9
  • Live-in maid service pays $1,000 per month
  • Twice-a-week service pays $10. per hour

~ * ~

Next on October 31, Shanghai, Day 11, Part 4: Silk Factory and More

For more related posts, click on China tab at the top of the page

© 2014 All Right Reserved TAK


45 Comments

100-Word Challenge for Grown-ups – Week #152

If you’d like to join in the fun, click below

http://jfb57.wordpress.com/2014/10/20/100-word-challenge-for-grown-ups-week152/

The prompt this week is … could I really wear that … +100 words

100wcgu-72

MASKED

Morag’s eyes rounded. “No way, José.” She moistened her lips and took a shallow breath.

“Yes, way.”

“Will this fit? Where’d you get it?”

“Try it.” Zena thrust the spilling black chiffon at Morag. “I’ll be back.”

She stroked the fabric, then threw on the dress. It flowed over her curves and puddled at her inelegant feet. Tiny rhinestones scattered over the skirt and bodice shimmered in the lamplight.

“You like?”

“It’s revealing…” Morag’s eyes glowed.

“Uh-huh. Here’s your Venetian mask.”

“Could I really wear that to hide these moles?”

“Remember, you’re the good witch tonight. Behave okay?”

Morag cackled. “I do love a party.”


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The most important letter ever written to the world (Please re-share)

Let's CUT the Crap!:

No-one can ignore the Ebola crisis, can they? Can you? Today, Canada has begun shipping its experimental Ebola vaccine to the World Health Organization.

Originally posted on Liberian Me :

Dear world

In just over six months, Ebola has managed to bring my country to a standstill. We have lost over 2,000 Liberians. Some are children struck down in the prime of their youth. Some were fathers, mothers, brothers or best friends. Many were brave health workers that risked their lives to save others, or simply offer victims comfort in their final moments…

There is no coincidence Ebola has taken hold in three fragile states – Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea – all battling to overcome the effects of interconnected wars. In Liberia, our civil war ended only eleven years ago. It destroyed our public infrastructure, crushed our economy and led to an exodus of educated professionals. A country that had some 3,000 qualified doctors at the start of the war was dependent by its end on barely three dozen. In the last few years, Liberia was bouncing back. We…

View original 421 more words


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Shanghai, Day 10, Part 2 – The Bund

Away from the stalking (however polite) salespeople at the embroidery shop, we headed to a different lunch experience. The atmosphere had a cafeteria look and feel, and the tables were banquet-hall length and communal. The following links show better than I can tell.

 Mongolian BBQ:

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/105702458

 Preparation of BBQ:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongolian_barbecue

Lunch finished, I visited the Ladies’ Room. Again the washrooms were opposite each other. I recognized the door I wanted by a high-heeled shoe decorating it and the Men’s by a black smoking pipe. When I prepared to wash my hands later, I found myself at the sink between two Chinese men. Putting my hands beneath the tap, I expected it to turn itself on. Nothing. The man on my right snatched my hands into a firm but gentle clasp and placed them opposite the sensor’s eye. Afterwards, my ever helpful minder noticed my indecision regarding the exit and with a gentle nudge, pointed me towards the nearest one. I imagined him shaking his head thinking I was a silly westerner.  

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles (Our cruise ship)

After lunch we headed to The Bund, the financial district with the famous Shanghai World Financial Centre (shaped like a bottle opener) and many other unique and grandiose structures. Jackie purchased tickets for our afternoon cruise on the Huangpu River, which divides Shanghai in half and is about 70 miles long. We cruised among barges transporting sand, coal and lumber among others for a good hour or so.

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

It was Sunday and a long weekend (Tomb Sweeping Festival). The walkways and pedestrian areas were full of visitors. I understand during any good weather, The Bund is a popular place to spend the day with friends.

The Huangpu River, The Bund Pictures and Nanpu Bridge:

https://www.google.ca/search?q=huangpu+river&rlz=1C1EODB_enCA562CA564&espv=2&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=sUlBVOiLLfHlsATUhYLABw&ved=0CEEQsAQ&biw=1242&bih=585

Sue didn’t want to sit outside on the top deck because she thought it would be too cool and windy. I followed her inside to the main floor and we were surprised to be alone. We grabbed a table in a snack area marked V.I.P. Ever observant, we then noticed a doorway leading to the cruise ship’s bow, enclosed with wraparound windows. We couldn’t believe our luck. No-one to bother us, cushy chairs and our own private ship. Within seconds an attendant came in and we were forced out and ended up outside anyway. To the untrained eye I suppose we didn’t have that V.I.P. aura.

IMG_0489

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

Sue didn’t want to sit outside on the top deck because she thought it would be too cool and windy. I followed her inside to the main floor and we were surprised to be alone. We grabbed a table in a snack area marked V.I.P. Ever observant, we then noticed a doorway leading to the cruise ship’s bow, enclosed with wraparound windows. We couldn’t believe our luck. No-one to bother us, cushy chairs and our own private ship. Within seconds an attendant came in and we were forced out and ended up outside anyway. To the untrained eye I suppose we didn’t have that V.I.P. aura. Insert Image #486, 487, 489, 498, (The Bund, the cruise, moi and our cruise ship) © 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

Shanghai Quick Facts:

  • Population 23 million
  • City is 6,800 square kilometres
  • Communist party began here in 1921
  • Home of silk
  • Beginning of silk road (trade: tea, pearls, jade)
  • During Hun dynasty, you could find a good horse here, an Arabian
  • 14 subway lines, over 500 kilometres long

~ * ~

Next on October 24, Shanghai, Day 10, Part 3 Old Bazaar and Other Shoppinng

For more related posts, click on China tab at the top of the page

© 2014 All Rights Reserved TAK


63 Comments

100-Word Challenge for Grown-ups – Week #152

100wcgu-72

To join in the fun, click below

 http://jfb57.wordpress.com/2014/10/13/100-word-challenge-for-grown-ups-week151-2/

Prompt this week: +100 words

100-word Pants and shoes

THIN AIR

“You sure, Grandma?”

“It’s all true, Lilly-bit.”

The ten-year-old gawked left, then right. “I don’t know. Sounds like a tall tale.”

“Not at all. It was a ghost on Halloween that did it.”

“Ghost?”

“The old farmer lived alone. A rowdy ghost came poking around looking for treasure she’d buried. When he investigated, she scared him out of his stiff and grimy pants and shoes.”

“Where’d he go?”

“Whoosh, vanished into thin air.”

“And the lady’s shoes?”

“Don’t need them where ghosts live. Only here.”

“And the treasure?”

“Not sure.”

“How do you know this?”

Grandma’s chin dropped; she grinned.

 

© 2014 TAK


121 Comments

Suzhou to Shanghai: Day 10, Part 1

At home, my regular breakfast consists of a small container of yogurt, a hard-boiled egg and coffee. From the first morning after our arrival in China, I ate breakfast as if it were my last meal. I even sampled more than one kind of roll although I rarely eat bread. An extravagant buffet breakfast is not easy to ignore, but I believe I burned all those calories during our days of walking and climbing and walking some more. I bet hoisting myself up into the bus consumed 1,000 calories, easy.

Sue checked her rash but it still had not improved and her legs and feet were still swollen. There was no pain and she was satisfied with that.

We started the day early to avoid crowds at Liu Garden (the Garden to Linger in), which Jackie, our guide, called The Lingering Garden. Upon entering the grounds, instructions about time and meeting location were dispatched immediately.

“If you need the Happy House, it is there.” Jackie waved in the direction of a low building. We squinted with pinched brows. What?

 “Happy House is toilet.” He checked the screen on his cell phone and was gone. We were on our own to wander as we wished. Again.

The garden was small, neat and clean. It seemed there’s no such thing as early. Passages were tight in spots and we had to wait for a turn to pass. We rubbed elbows with lots of other visitors. Lorena lost us when she stopped for a photo opportunity. Not successful in finding us, she headed back to the parking lot where the buses were parked. She saw the French Group’s guide, who then called Jackie and he joined us up together again.

Back on the bus, we settled in for a two-hour ride to Shanghai passing the time napping or talking, sometimes asking Jackie questions.

Once again we were treated to a tourist wonderland of Cashmere / Cashmina factory shopping. The sweaters, shawls etc. didn’t interest me. I noticed the men’s pained faces as if they’d been lined up for a firing squad.

Before we left the factory, a museum stop on the schedule was voted down in favor of more shopping time at the bazaar in the afternoon. Jackie suggested this was a great place for picking up knock-offs which are illegal everywhere.

 Silk Embroidery Shop:

This work was the most amazing embroidery I shall ever see. Some was done in 1/64th thickness of a silk strand. I wonder if the workers have good compensation when they go blind. Even with my nose an inch from the finished product, I could have sworn these were paintings. Some were three dimensional and especially the fur on some animals was ultra realistic and breathtaking.

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

 The following  is the best link I could find for silk embroidery display (jade is also included)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/45909111@N00/sets/72157607927737804/

Chinese Saying:

He (or she) has a jade face (is good looking)

Jade is highly valued, therefore this is the highest compliment you can pay someone.

 ~ * ~

Next on October 17, Shanghai, Day 10, Part 2 – Huangpu River and the Bund

 For more related posts, click on China tab at the top of the page

© 2014 All Right Reserved TAK

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