How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE

Flash in the Pan – Marble

79 Comments


Ralphie rocked from foot to foot and sucked air in between his teeth.

“Listen twerp, you playing or wetting your pants?” Stevie’s eyes gleamed; his fat cheeks and elfin ears burned red. “You gonna cry?”

Hands twitchy, Ralphie toed dirt and blinked. “I gots one marble left.”

morgueFile free photos

morgueFile free photos

“Bye. See you.”

“It’s a green Cat’s Eye, a big one.”

“Yeah? Let me see. Give you five commons for it.”

“No. Gimme ten?”

“Let’s see.”

The blond boy straightened, eyebrows raised high. He yanked tatty pockets out of his grimy chinos, face pinched death white.

Stevie snickered and boogied a rain dance.

~ * ~

The Winter Quarter of Flash in the Pan is here. The theme: Boys and Their Toys. For the rules and how to join, click: http://mommasmoneymatters.com/flash-fiction/

The word limit for Marble is 100 words. I used all 100.

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

79 thoughts on “Flash in the Pan – Marble

  1. He better give him the ten commons!!!!

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  2. ‘Boogied a rain dance’ is a fab phrase!

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  3. Great descriptions, “sucked air in between his teeth” “fat cheeks…Elfin ears…” Really good writing Tess. 🙂 And, clever use of marbles to set the scene.

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  4. My husband has a big tub of marbles from his kid days. He let the kids play with and lose a lot, but he still got the good ones.

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  5. I used to LOVE to play marbles with my brother. Oh, dear, have I just dated myself?…

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  6. My Dad used to talk about playing marbles as a kid. I had forgotten all about that. Wonderful writing!

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  7. Kids are so mean! It’s nice when they learn to keep it inside.

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  8. That brought back memories – thanks!

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  9. ahh kids – boys in particular and the games they play with marbles or minds. This took me back to when I was being minded and decided to swallow the biggest – Tom Thumbs? I can’t remember the name. The lady who was minding me, stuck her fingers down my throat to retrieve, so glad she did otherwise perhaps I wouldn’t be here today 🙂 Thanks for the…reminder 😦 lol x

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  10. Great story and use of phrase and descriptions. I am glad my Brother won’t (I hope) read this or he will start again even though it was decades ago. “Remember the time you lost my cat’s eye…blah blah blah. Well Bro, didn’t lose it, even worse, gave it away as I didn’t know its value…oops. Mum’s skirts came in handy for some time (me running and hiding behind them).

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  11. poor Ralphie needs a big hug!

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  12. I feel like a kid again.
    Thanks!

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  13. great story and well written! Enjoyed the read.

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  14. I was never any good at marbles, Tess. I always lost mine. Never had any to swap. Good job really, as I’d have only lost those as well! Great story!

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  15. I loved marbles, LOVED them in a big way. What a hoot to read this, thanks Tess. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Geraldine. Brought back memories for me too. How I survived that time I can’t begin to guess. 😉

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      • I think we had a LOT more fun than kids do now, in so many ways.

        As Michelle Obama said during the fitness incentive that she led in the US, Let’s Move (I think the name was, maybe still ongoing) anyhoo…when we were kids we were outside for hours at a time, running,skipping, playing all kinds of games. We had to be literally dragged in at the end of the day, by mom calling on the back porch. I read her words and I nodded and smiled…yes, that’s how I remember growing up too.

        Now, it seems that waaaay too many kids are glued to their computers and TV’s getting fatter, sicker…it’s so sad and so unnecessary too.

        I applaud the First Lady’s work on this campaign. I hope it has continued.

        There, I’m off my soapbox now Tess! 😉

        Hugs and Happy Weekend, G

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      • I agree with you. My young days were spent outside too but after I did chores and we ran and skipped and played baseball and chased each other and shoveled snow.
        Today, I’m sad to say my six and ten-year-old grand kids are too busy to answer me because they are plugged into an iPad and a tablet.

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  16. I don’t understand the Flash in the Pan thing, but you did a great job with the story. Like the marble photo. I was a wicked marble player when I was a kid.

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  17. My little daughter has a bag of marbles. She used to love taking them to school to play marbles against the boys, but unfortunately school has stopped the playing of marbles. Your writing is always fab, Tess 🙂

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  18. Marbles is a fun game Tess
    and your writing, well it gets
    better every time I call in 🙂

    Have an awesome Thursday 🙂

    Andro xxxx

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  19. Oh I remember playing marbles. Too bad I lost them 😉

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  20. loved this, brought back so many memories!

    i just recently bought a batch of marbles, couldn’t find them anywhere, had to make an afternoon out of trying to find them!

    thanks for sharing

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  21. You nailed it again, Tess. Brought back so many memories. I remember putting marbles into the oven just long to get them to crack from the inside out, but not break. They looked very cool that way!

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  22. Oh how I remember those marbles! Love this, Tess, you get better and better and you were damn good before 🙂

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  23. Tess: Being a rancher’s daughter, none of my brothers played marbles and consequently I didn’t know how to play either. We lived 60 miles from nowhere and certainly that far from concrete or pavement. It wasn’t until I met Tom that I understood the value of certain marbles. His champions, as he calls them, have a special nest along with his grandfather’s railroad gold watch and a few other mementos.

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    • I love this story, Sheri, that grown up boys still value such things as marbles on the same par as a grandfather’s watch.
      We lived in a small mining town in the Canadian North and I’m sure we didn’t get wind of anything going on in the larger world until it was already old everyplace else. 😀

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  24. Not what I would have thought of for boys and their toys 😉
    But I do remember the marble-hoarding days.

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