How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE

100-Word Challenge for Grown-ups – Week #139

73 Comments


Please checkout http://jfb57.wordpress.com/2014/06/30/100-word-challenge-for-grown-ups-week139/ for this challenge.

This week’s prompt is …but even when I listened carefully… + 100 words

 

100wcgu-72

Meaning

 Those are tulips—I think. I prefer roses in dark velvet hues. My favourite is carmine—a deep merlot. Someone said carmine looks like dried blood. What a thought.

“Still awake? Time for the toilet and a nap.”

Her voice, pleasant at first, offended my ears. I watched her face for a hint of meaning. The sounds finished, jumbled and empty.

“Ellen, let’s go.” She clapped, then tugged my arm, but even when I listened carefully I couldn’t understand.

Who is this now?

“You’ve stared at that painting enough.”

My vision blurred and lip stung.

“Nurse is busy today,” she said.

The word no escaped me.

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

73 thoughts on “100-Word Challenge for Grown-ups – Week #139

  1. That is sad! but sadly true.

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  2. So sad, and so familiar to my work world. 😦

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  3. A lot said here. Like the other comments I find it sad but also a bit scary. Maybe because I am “of a certain age”?

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  4. Ellen, insist on “No”.
    Insist that the world slows down long enough to consider the colours of the flowers. Tomorrow the flowers may no longer be there and the opportunity will be lost forever.

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  5. Sounds like the opening to a deep story of life. Any memories of China there to keep the heroine simmering over a lost love who gave her roses in dark velvet hues?

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  6. Definitely pulls at my heart Tess. As a nurse of over three decades I always hope that those in my profession shower compassion on others.

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  7. Poor Ellen, this is the worse nightmare and I’m sure it happens even here still.

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  8. So few words and telling of an emotional tale. 😉

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  9. Wow. What an unexpected point of view! Marvelous.

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  10. Some really great lines here, Tess. “Still awake? Time for the toilet and a nap.” = love it!

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  11. Amazing what you area able to say in so few words!

    Hugs from Ecuador,
    Kathy

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  12. Enjoyed freading your 100 words. Love the opening description re: the flowers. I can picture the scene in the nursing home or hospital ward.

    I focussed on deafness during old age in my challenge. I look forward to reading your work next week!

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  13. That is confusing, but it jangled some memories. Oddly, there are times people talk and it takes me too long–5 or 10 words–to figure out what they’re saying. I don’t know if it’s noise or accent or what, but I feel like your character. What the h*** does that mean?

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  14. Poignant, thought-provoking and yes, scary. I’m shocked at how quickly thoughts leave my mind and I can’t remember what I was saying a mere second ago. I’m sure blogging will prove to be the great cure for memory loss. though!! And as I just posted on my Facebook Page, a little snippet about sniffing rosemary (the herb, not the woman, haha!) can improve our memories by 75%!!! Who knew? Another fine flash Tess, as always 😀 <D 🙂

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  15. Oh Tess, this one is significant. Sad. You did this so well it caught my heart.

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  16. Good, good writing, Tess. As usual. You’ve captured the ageing issue, which has been on my mind a lot lately, perfectly.

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  17. Reblogged this on mihran Kalaydjian and commented:
    100-Word Challenge for Grown-ups – Week #139

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  18. These words brought to mind the times I would hurry mama as she took her time looking at things. One day it hit me, I would one day not have to opportunity to go about dawdling with her. I slowed myself down and was patient. Holding her elbow, slowly walking with her, letting her look as long as she wished. I’m glad.

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  19. Hey Tess, just wanted to tell you, I just met Julia from Julia’s Place who runs this 100 word challenge! She runs the under 16s 100 word challenge in schools, and she had contacted me completely separately through my work Twitter account about that (without knowing that I had any blogging connection), because she had seen that my job involves working with schools. And she arranged to come and have a meeting with me about promoting it to the schools we work with. Funny!

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  20. Oh my! You are superb. A brief bit of fiction, so sad… almost poetic. Loved it.

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    • You have made my day. Thank YOU. I like your writing too. 🙂

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      • That’s really nice to hear. And it’s awfully lovely to have you following my blog. I am much impressed with your ability to write brief pieces of fiction that convey so much in so few words. It is not easy!

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      • You are welcome!
        Thank you new friend. With encouragement like that I might manage to scribble a few more. I’m only a couple of years into writing.

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      • Really? I would never have guessed that; you have a graceful style, everything flows very well, and I like the way you leave much to the reader’s imagination.

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      • Thank YOU. I’m always worried the reader may not see the picture. 😉

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      • I wish I could remember which very famous author it was, perhaps Tolstoy, who said we must give readers room to guess, to figure out the story. I am very much paraphrasing, but that was the gist. Have you ever noticed in literary fiction, everything is not spelled out? There are hints, and readers work to draw their conclusions. For example, if you read a short story by Chekhov, everything is not laid out completely for the reader. We are meant to think about the story, turn it over in our minds, draw our conclusions. I like that.

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      • My game plan sometimes backfires. When a reader asks or tells me something about the story which isn’t there, I panic. 🙂

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      • I don’t want to hog your thread, so I’ll just quickly add this. Harlan Ellison, sf writer, once said something to the effect that certain stories connect with readers in ways he sometimes hadn’t foreseen. Because we are all so unique, we see different things, sometime intended, sometimes not. Hey, when someone asks you something you hadn’t intended and you’re not sure what to say, consider saying, “Well, what did the story mean to YOU?”

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      • *smiles* Yes, I have. 😀 Thank you for your time and help..

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      • BTW, I appreciate your generosity in taking time to discuss this. Thank you.

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  21. Chilling! And beautifully unexpected.
    I like the details about colour too.

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Some things in life are complicated. Let's keep it simple.

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