How the Cookie Crumbles

Life and scribbles on the far side of SIXTY-FIVE

Xian: Day 8, Part 2 –The Real Terracotta Warriors

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Before we visited the Terracotta Warrior Factory, Sue asked our tour guide, Steve, if he recognized the rash she had on her ankles. In the past few days the eruption had changed from mild to a full-blown inflamed mess. It had spread like fire from her ankles half-way up her calves and shinbones. As well, her legs were swollen and she had a liquid pouch beneath the skin above her toes. We all checked our ankles and legs. All had a similar rash, but it was mild compared to Sue’s. Carolyn had none.

Steve, bless him, took her to a Pharmacy for a solution. None was given. Either this was a mystery or the pharmacist didn’t want to take any chances with a foreigner. Time wasted? I don’t think any of our group minded.

When the bus arrived at the Terracotta Warrior Museum we encountered hustlers offering wheelchair assistance. What? How old did we look? Sure we were all over 60 and younger than 75—hardly decrepit. I rolled my eyes at Sue, and skipped like a schoolgirl to prove my agility. Later when I thought of it, I hadn’t noticed anyone else in a wheelchair all afternoon.

Inside the Museum:  Horses and Chariot

 © All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

Cavalry Men

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

Lots of figurines and tourist merchandise on sale again. Hordes of people along the walk from the parking lot, to the museum, and to each of the three pits, which were housed in separate buildings. I scanned the crowds surrounding us and noticed people from all over the world. At one point we met university students from Alberta, Canada. We chatted but only for a second to exchange where we lived.

Standing Archer

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

Standing Archer Plaque

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

My first view of the warriors took my breath away. They looked so real, as if they waited with eyes closed. No two faces were alike. This army had prevailed for two millennia, row upon row, facing the same direction, lines straight, prepared and intent to protect the tomb of their emperor. I expected they would be red but over time the color had leached out into the soil they were buried in.

© 2014 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

 

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

 I was shocked to learn none of these warriors had been found whole. Think of all the reconstruction work. The mystery continues whether the compacted ground overhead might have been responsible or if the destruction was by calculated intent. As well, fire in some areas was also evident by the blackened portions of unearthed wood pieces.

Do watch this. It is fascinating and well worth your time. I stumbled onto this documentary after my trip.

I witnessed my first child’s tantrum. Between three and five, arms swinging, the boy hit his mother and screamed at the top of his lungs and wouldn’t stop. This was the only public demonstration of a disorderly youngster during our time in China.

Tired and overwhelmed, we met Steve at the allocated spot. He waited, dough-faced, on a bench in the shade. I wondered why he soldiered on. Might the reason have anything to do with employment or tour guide rules?

Steve’s tummy continued to give him trouble. On the way to dinner, the driver pulled over at a gas station. We hadn’t seen many, and it was weird to see one when one was needed. The parking was tight and next to impossible, but our driver backed into a spot with ease. I expected scrape, crash and let’s-get-the-hell-outta-here cringing!  Click here

Before Steve exited the bus he warned us, “Do not follow me. If you have to go, hold it. You will not like this bathroom.”

We couldn’t help wondering what he meant. I’m glad we didn’t experience any of these.

Dinner:

  • Lotus root, sliced
  • Cucumbers, sliced
  • Rice
  • Beef, cubed with onion and red peppers
  • Orange chicken
  • Beef with onion
  • Fish and celery
  • Cooked cabbage
  • Greens Eggplant
  • Vegetable soup
  • Sliced melon for dessert
  • Donut-type dessert (1-1-/2” diameter) with additional icing sugar for dipping

 © 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

Arrived at hotel at 7:20 p.m., the earliest night yet. At last time to read, relax, and sort our luggage again

 

Next on September 26 –  Xian to Shanghai Day 9, Part 1

For more related posts, click on China tab at the top of the page

© 2014 All Right Reserved TAK

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

82 thoughts on “Xian: Day 8, Part 2 –The Real Terracotta Warriors

  1. Awesome. I’m curious about how the lotus root tasted? I guess there are “problem children” everywhere.

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  2. What a fascinating museum. Glad you were able to “skip” your way through it. We don’t need no stinkin’ wheelchairs!

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  3. This is AMAZING…as amazing as when I saw the performance of the Chinese during the 2008 Beijing Olympics. I am referring to their precise movement during their musical performance.

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  4. I think I want one of the warriors. I have a perfect spot for it in my back yard. And what about the rash! Is that in the next installment?

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  5. Wonderfully personable and warm text and great pictures of these fascinations.. and then there’s the food! Enjoyed this thoroughly.

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  6. I have been so intriqued by warriors. I saw a movie – Jet Li actor, I think? Where the warriors came to life – the terracotta falling in pieces from them as they came alive. Very spooky but really cool at the same time. I think it is so wonderful you have been able to see all these incredible sights. That rash though….you know how neurotic I am. I wouldn’t have gotten close to her and would have sat as far away from Steve as possible! LOL, today I saw the same type of child and tantrum at the grocery and the mother just took it. when he left her for a few minutes before she realized it, he came and started trying to push my basket. I told him he was a hateful little beast and if he didn’t stop, I’d chop him to pieces and put him the meat counter….and stuck my tongue out at him. He went screaming to his mom who looked down my way. I gave her the old, who, me? look and smiled. Little beast. I abhor hateful children and want to beat their parents.

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    • Coming alive….woooo spooky. Three of us had the same rash. The fourth lady did not. At the start they all looked the same but Sue’s worsened. Then mine and Bonnie’s got a little more angry not not screaming mad like Sue’s. Never found out what it was. Mine went away as did Bonnie’s after a bit. What bothered me was the pouch of blood(?) that she could move around above her toes.

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      • whoa….it not only rashed, it blistered. probably serum that was in the pouch. I hope you all went forthwith the MD after you got home. But you could hve brushed against a plant you didn’t have at home or been bitten by a little buggie or skeeter that was different and Bonnie had a more serious reaction. Sometimes allergic reactions will blister but not that often. that was a bit of poison in addition to what sounds like a histamine reaction.

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      • No we didn’t see any medical people. Sue only saw the pharmacist. Bonnie’s and mine receded and disappeared. Susan had her’s for days. Must check my notes to see how long (if I’d kept track or that too).

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  7. This is an awesome post. I love the pictures and the video clips. It must have been so great to see. It is on my list of things to see but reading your post was like being there. Thanks!

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  8. That must have pretty impressive seeing it for real.. I saw an exhibition here with only a few,, and that was impressive.. a memory of the future. 😉

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  9. I didn’t know they had to be re-assembled. What an enormous task and I wonder why on earth they were made tin the first place, some strange symbolic reason? Thanks Tess this is a brilliant post 🙂

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  10. Really amazing, the museum of terracotta warriors looks so huge!

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  11. This really is a stunning place. I’m looking forward to visiting the Terracotta Warrios someday.

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  12. These really must have been a stunning sight and I hope to see them one day.

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  13. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    Another fascinating series that I have been following is the trip through China on How the Cookie Crumbles – this week the stunning Terracotta Warriors that have stood for over two thousand years all facing the same way as they protect their long dead emperor. Do pop in and catch up on the previous 8 days and absorb not just the magnificent sights to be found on the trip but also a insight into the food and culture you are likely to encounter.

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  14. I love this one! The Warriors have fascinated me since their discovery. Similar to the Egyptians and their burial of precious items and even favored slaves, this was fascinating and even surreal. The things we do in fear of the afterlife. Can you imagine the monumental task of the original creation? Even more the recreation, now as they uncover and try to put them back together. I think it is amazing they have now found a way to preserve even the paint on the figures.

    The dinner looks great. I hope you all figured out the rash, it doesn’t sound good at all.

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  15. This is a terrific post. I love your photographs. Well done. Hugs, Barbara

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  16. A wonderful post! Pray no one wakes them from their slumbers! 😉

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  17. Such an interesting place — and the food looks wonderful!

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  18. Tess, I am completely fascinated by the warriors. We watched a program about them on the National Geographic channel. Great pics. This would be worth the air travel for me. How wonderful you got to do it.

    Isn’t it annoying when they treat you as if you’re ancient? At the market they hand you one bag with a box of Kleenex and ask you if you need help with it. Really?

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  19. Fascinating post.
    I wonder how Sue solved her rash problem. Perhaps this problem will be solved in a future post.

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  20. That is so cool honestly!! 🙂

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  21. Tess this is incredible! I think going to see the Terracotta Warriors would be on my top ten list of musts if I had a wish list. I can’t wait to watch the video. I hope the rash went away and Sue was good for the rest of the trip. I can only imagine the awe at standing there and seeing this sight.

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  22. What a lovely post, Tess! I always liked the Terracotta Warriors and their pleasing spookiness. I knew it was a huge thing, but i don’t think i truly grasped the grand scale of it before. It had to be an amazing place to visit. (And i’m glad you skipped to the door!)

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  23. The warrior museum looks amazing, Tess. Something I would like to visit. Thank you for sharing your photos, they are so interesting.

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  24. Again, you share your beautiful photography skills. Oh my, that bathroom story had to be awful, always a fear with me eating foreign food. Glad you didn’t follow, lol. 🙂

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  25. the food continues to look amazing. I am salivating over here. so interesting and the things I am learning …..priceless 😉

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  26. So is Sue’s rash gone? I thought the Xian warriors were amazing. What people did without assembly line work and no television! I noticed someone asked you about the lotus root? Did you like it? I did. As I remember it had an unusual, flowery taste. Am I all wrong in my memory?

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  27. Tess these photos are amazing. I would so love to visit. You are inspiring a trip to China I think 🙂

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  28. None of them look alike. That is astounding considering how many there are and if the artist used models. And poor Steve a bad tummy and a nasty toilet. Not a good combo. Any idea what caused the rash?

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  29. Tess – You had a total enrichment travel package, or so it seems to me. I’m amazed at how much you have already packed into your visit up to this point. Your travel writing and the sights you experienced from food to the quality of the air (all important to travelers making extended travel plans) – coupled with your ‘at home’ approach in telling of your own trip would be a travel agent’s dream in selling guided group tours. Many individuals don’t like to take guided tours but there are some really good ones out there and some really bad ones. These travel blogs are first class, as is everything you do. With love, Sheri

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  30. The tomb is just amazing! Omword! The devotion and love that went into it to make it and then to restore it … makes me feel really impatient … 😊

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  31. I have never seen anything like this tomb! Amazing! My internet connection is crazy slow right now, but I will watch the video you recommended when all is flowing better.

    I had to laugh at the hustlers with wheelchairs. I can just see you skipping!
    I agree with Sheri… you write TOP NOTCH travel blogs!!!

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  32. Interesting Blog. I was reading Maggie’s (Trepidatious Traveller) blogpost and saw you too left a message. Your name got me intrigued LOL.

    Your meal in this post looks fantastic, how jealous am I? LOL

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  33. Wow–how cool is that? Did you ever get an explanation for Sue’s rash?

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  34. Amazing things here. I have always been interested in the Terra Cotta army. This was the best coverage yet. Thanks

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  35. I wouldn’t miss reading about this for the world Tess, and I ‘m not disappointed, nor expected to be 😀 What an incredible experience to have seen the Terracotta Army in the flesh, so to speak. I always expected them to be red too so I was fascinated to read that the colour has leached away. I had no idea how it was discovered, excavated and put together, nor that there were horses and chariots too! Found this a thoroughly gripping read. Love the photos too. And on a final note…I hope your friend Sue was alright? That rash sounded very unpleasant 😦

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  36. The soldiers are mind boggling enough on a ‘puter, as one of my students used to say. Those I would have enjoyed seeing “live” 😉

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  37. I love how you use “a member of english 8” – the new blue rider 😉

    Seeing the photos of the warriors “underground” is impressive, but also makes me think what a shame to waste all those resources and all that creativity on something to be buried. Of course that way we get to see them…

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  38. Hi! I just found your blog through another blog and am loving your China posts. I currently live in China and spent last year living in Xi’an. It’s always great to read posts on the beautiful city and of course see pictures of the amazing food!

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  39. I’ve studied this a bit (my little one is fascinated by the Terracotta Army) but seeing your photos is mind-blowing. I’ve read about and seen pictures of this but your photo with the people in the background gives such perspective and a sense of how enormous this really is. (P.S. SO glad you didn’t have to go to the bathroom. Oh, and thanks for the link, BTW. I’ll never get those images out of my head.) 😉

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