How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE

Shanghai: Day 12, Part 1 – Flight to Wuhan

91 Comments


We had a leisurely breakfast with nothing on the schedule for the morning. Although a five-star, our hotel was situated too far from the Bund and the waterfront attractions for wandering around on our own.

Sue walked around the neighborhood and bought a pair of shoes. RJ and his wife went out and explored as well. Lots of real life to discover behind the scenes after all. I stayed behind, caught up on e-mail and repacked my suitcase, which had become heavier.

The poor live on one side of the street and the better off on the other:

As we traveled by bus to our lunch destination, I caught sight of a duo hanging off a skyscraper washing windows. You read that correctly: no scaffolding only a rope to secure them from falling as they swung in the wind. What kind of Health and Safety rules are there for workers I wondered?

Chinese saying:

Red lights are a suggestion; crosswalks are just a decoration.

Crosswalks and lights are ignored and no-one is ticketed for not stopping for pedestrians. Jaywalkers cross in the middle of traffic or at crosswalks, proceeding no matter what the suggestion or decoration. Two hundred people are killed a day in China due to traffic accidents.

Quick Facts:

  • Population in China: 1.3 billion
  • Beijing: 20 million (capital)
  • Shanghai: 23 million

We arrived too early for lunch at a moored ship—Sea Palace Floating Restaurant—and were the only patrons. The waitress might have put on a less stern face. She led us to a table where we waited longer than usual for our meal. Until this occurrence, once seated the food arrived within minutes. I looked around, we chatted and took advantage of the Happy House.

All tables had seating for ten. Down the length of the ship, I counted 10 tables in each row, times four rows across. As we finished eating, I noticed the restaurant had begun to fill up in earnest.

Lunch:

  • Baby bok choy
  • Breaded white fish
  • Chicken with green and red peppers
  • Onions and pineapple
  • Mystery soup
  • Scrambled eggs
  • Beef with red and green peppers and onions
  • Sweet and sour chicken with red and green peppers
  • Curried chicken and potatoes with red and green peppers White rice
  • Watermelon slices

When  food is left over, we wondered more than once what’s done with the remains. Were they thrown out like in North America? I’d always been under the impression that the Chinese wasted nothing.

After lunch we drove to Shanghai Pudong International Airport to catch China Southern, a domestic flight at 15:55. According to our trip schedule, this was supposed to have been a morning flight. Check-in was smooth this time. None in our group were pulled over for additional security check(s).

WiFi and a charging station stared at me at our boarding area. I tried to logon to the internet but couldn’t switch from Chinese to English, the only language greyed out in the list. I wanted to check if my daughter had answered the morning’s e-mail. This ticked me off a bit: handy but untouchable with 55 minutes to kill before boarding for a two-hour flight.

 ~ * ~

A Special Treat:

 RJ continues to share photos. His wife Bonnie sent me this link. Prepare to be mesmerized. Make sure you have your heart medicine handy. Grab a drink and put your feet up.

~ * ~

Next on November 28, Wuhan, Day 12, Part 2 – Cruise Ship

For more related posts, click on China tab at the top of the page

© 2014 All Right Reserved TAK

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

91 thoughts on “Shanghai: Day 12, Part 1 – Flight to Wuhan

  1. Elegant appearing restaurant and another yummy looking lunch. I like the Chinese saying. Interesting as well that a road divides the upper and lower class. What a great trip. 🙂

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  2. Those are some frightful statistics, Tess. And the economic divide right in the middle of the street…
    But yes, what a mesmerizing video! Mega-hugs my friend. 🙂

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  3. Interesting contrasts–from men hanging from buildings to elegant restaurants.
    I had to show my husband the video!

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  4. First, that video was fabulous. Sounds as though you had a somewhat quiet day, nice now and then when you are running hither and yon, right? The luncheon sounded lovely, well except for mystery soups.

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    • I didn’t eat soup now that I think of it. Too filling and lots of other good food to eat. If I didn’t recognize it or if someone in the group didn’t comment other than, “Mm, good.,” I didn’t know what it was.

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  5. Wow, pretty impressive acrobatics there! The Chinese really know how to do stuff like that!

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  6. Considering Chinese movies, and especially the martial arts movies, proves their expertise with cranes and suspension activities. Such a contrast from Japan as to traffic fatalities. They definitely obey traffic rules. As to health and safety rules, window washers and other such workers are lower class workers and expendable, been that way for many centuries. They are lucky to have the work and grateful for it. But your trip sounds increasingly interesting and a Tru learning experience. As usual, the food intrigues. I have a feeling food goes home with workers as they are paid little as well. I imagine they are happy for the leftovers. Because they also have different health rules, it would not be a bad thing for them to take leftovers.

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  7. Tess I can hardly believe the stats of 200 deaths per day! Being a pedestrian is like an extreme sport!
    I watched some of the video. Beautiful and yes mesmerizing.

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  8. Wow! You wouldn’t want to get your wires crossed with stunts like that! Thanks for sharing.

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  9. I’m overwhelmed trying to contemplate the number of people there. I can’t do it. I have to admit there are many foods I would love to try that you picture and talk about. Some, not so much. But some, definitely.

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  10. Two hundred people a day killed by traffic accidents? Wow, you think that would spur the government to action. Must be scary to be a pedestrian around there, especially if you’re a tourist.

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  11. Another great insight into Chinese life and culture . Not to mention Po faced waitresses. The video is out of this world. xxxx

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  12. Some countries take health and safety more seriously than others. That is a lot of road deaths to accept as normal and not do anything about! When I was in Poland earlier this year there was an on the spot fine deterrent for jay-walking.

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  13. Pineapple and onion?? Cooked together or raw? Was it nice?
    The deaths statistic does not surprise me – I think the value of life is strongly correlated with average income of a population and inversely correlated to population size. So low wages, high population, low value of life.
    The skills of the performers in the video are incredible!

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    • The onions were cooked = softened. The pineapple was warm. Must have been thrown in at the last.

      I bet the people in the video work hard and perform divinely, but for what pay? Buttons. Glad you enjoyed the video. I want to watch it again. And again.

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  14. I am having a panic attack just thinking of that many people!!!

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  15. Crossing roads is definitely seen very differently all around the world.

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  16. That restaurant looks like a cruise ship! The food looked and sounded good there.

    Wow that video was incredible, I’ve never seen anything quite like that before, I couldn’t stop watching!

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  17. The video is amazing, when I saw pink perform I thought that was scary stuff, that though…scary and crazy. How the haves live to have nots, sad state of affairs and life. Restaurant looks incredible. Xx

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  18. The vicarious thrill of following your journey knows no bounds! Appalling, though, to hear about the road deaths.

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  19. You comments about the traffic reminds me of the first time I traveled to Egypt and we were taking a bus from Cairo to Alexandria. We were waiting for the time to leave and were near a traffic light. It changed from red to yellow and green and it made no difference to the traffic. I was telling my friend Iman that they might as well turn them off, at least they’d save some energy. And the shared taxis and all that…I’m not sure I’d have the stamina for such a long trip although amazing experiences…

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  20. COOL video. I was, indeed mesmerized. Glad that the Chinese version of TSA didn’t cause you any trouble.

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  21. Certainly a world of difference in Shanghai. Cool floating restaurant!!

    Vijay

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  22. I wouldn’t want to think too hard about what they do with leftover food!
    That video is incredible, I don’t know how they even conceive the idea much less put it into practice!

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  23. I envy you, my beautiful friend. You’re traveling while I serve travelers.
    Good for you!

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  24. I wait for this post every week, Tess. A live kaleidoscope! Absolutely fantastic!

    Hubby and I visit a Chinese restaurant every Friday here in our little town. It’s owned and operated by a Chinese family who still have thick accents. We almost always get there before the restaurant is officially opened. Yet, we’re ushered in with open arms. I think it’s because we’re two of the few who leave a tip. They always set us at the same booth and know exactly what we want to drink each time.

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  25. Tess, I tried to post a comment earlier but the comment box froze up, second or third time that has happened here. Hopefully this one will go through. Thanks for another “bite” of your Asian adventures and have a great weekend.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. I remember when I traveled in the USSR (pre-Russia) that cars always had the right-of-way. Pedestrians had no protections. I was 20 then. Now I much better understand the law of different cultures.

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    • After all this talk of traffic, it brings to mind my visit to New York City when I was 17. Pedestrians competed with traffic when the lights were red. Hm. How had I forgotten. Not different at all. No idea how that has or hasn’t changed in the last 60 years.

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  27. Oooh… mystery soup! Curious! 😀

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    • I didn’t have much soup because there was too much good stuff and I didn’t want to fill up. This soup was different. I’m not saying bad. Not at all. We just couldn’t put a name to it like most other times.The food was always tasty.

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  28. I remember crossing the road in China. There was lots of whistling, from the police I seem to recollect. This had something to do with controlling the traffic I think! Did you see any dogs while in Shanghai? I know that an increasing number of Chinese people are keeping dogs as pets but there are, I understand strict regulations about the size of dog which can be kept in cities.

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  29. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    Day 12 of our virtual trip around China with How the Cookie Crumbles and this week Tess leaves Shanghai on the way to Wuhan. Some interesting traffic statistics… and I do love that most meals always have a mystery element! Enjoy the descriptive narrative and the great photographs. Next week Tess will be joining us as the guest on the Sunday Show… great post as always.

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  30. I so enjoy reading your ‘aside’ comments as you view Chinese life. I’m glad we have an “OSHA” in America (Occupational Safety and Health Association). No window washers hanging from windows, and it’s the law to follow the traffic lights. What a daily tragic loss of life in China re traffic accidents.

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  31. I continue to enjoy your travelogue, Tess. And the video was breathtaking. Looking forward to more…

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  32. The difference between the two sides of the street is incredible. And as for health and safety, well, there appears to be none! The floating restaurant looks lovely – shame about the sour face – and as for the video, well, no wonder you gave your warning! Wow, never seen anything quite like it, how on earth do they do it? Thanks for sharing that, really is mind blowing…and continue to love your anecdotes and shares about the way life is over there, away from the tourist’s path. I have learnt so much from you Tess, truly fascinating ❤

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  33. Wow! Talk about living on the wrong side of the street!

    On another note, let me make sure I got this straight: You were served a “mystery soup” and you ate it?! You are a braver person that I, that’s for sure!

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  34. Window cleaners on ropes, and 200 pedestrians a day killed – with 1.3 billion people, life is cheaper in China than in the west. And with the lack of oversight, when I traveled in China, I avoided Chinese Airlines when possible. ~James

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  35. 200 pedestrians a day killed a day – wow. I’m always intrigued by the food you were served during your great China Adventure. I would have passed on the Mystery Soup – I’m not very brave! LOL!

    That video was incredible! Stunning and beautiful. Thank you for sharing. ❤

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  36. With stats like that one would think the government would do something about the rules of the road and the ignorance thereof. Very interesting post again Tess. 🙂

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  37. It does sound an amazing country. Mystery soup, huh? I think Cathy (Catbird in China) would be steering clear of that one 🙂

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