How the Cookie Crumbles

Life and scribbles on the far side of SIXTY-FIVE

Chongquin, Day 17, Part 1: Panda Zoo

84 Comments


We had our last breakfast on the Yangtze Cruise ship. At 8:00 a.m. our new female guide, Romy, had arrived to escort us from ship. We disembarked at Chongqing. It was a long walk to the bus dragging our luggage along a long and narrow steel walks, bridges, a dark unsavory market where people gaped. Our next stop: the Chongqing Zoo to see the Pandas.

Quick Facts:

  • Two days ago we were already in Chongqing when we were at the Gorges
  • Chongqing is a municipality since 1997
  • Has 32 million people
  • Area has expanded: 3rd biggest city in the world
  • 82 thousand square kilometers
  • West to east: 470 km. Takes 8 hours to cross
  • Gambling illegal in China except legal in Macao
  • Chongqing is an upper and lower city
  • 1937 – 1943 – runway for air-force
  • Lots of bomb shelters 1937 – 1943 built in caves
  • Seniors look after grandchildren, play mah-jong and exercise (tai chi)
  • Husbands are hen-pecked, also do cooking, laundry, and look after children
  • Tai Chi for middle-aged not young people
  • Breakfast is one egg, soy milk and outdoor Tai Chi afterwards
  • Chongqing summer temperature is 40 degrees Celsius

The wide boulevards in the park-like setting of the zoo attracted dancing and T’ai Chi enthusiasts:

© 2015 All Right Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie

© 2015 All Right Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie

Panda Quick Facts:

  • Gave a couple of panda (1 male and 1 female) to Toronto Zoo last year 2013(?)
  • Artificial insemination successful three times
  • Panda called bear / cat but they are not related to cat, maybe racoon (scientists are still studying relationship)
  • Morning is a good time to visit Pandas as they are active and come out then
  • Besides Panda, important is Northern (|Siberian) Tiger
  • China Southern Tiger suffers extinction. Only about 100 in captivity
  • Also know her is Golden Fur Monkey
  • White Lip Deer
  • Yangtze River dolphin (don’t see them anymore)
  • Sturgeon

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

People facts:                                  

  • Northern Chinese is taller
  • Southern Chinese is smaller
  • Yangtze divides north and south China
  • Women here like male to be at least 20 cm taller than she
  • 3,000 Yuan penalty for second child / Romy, our guide) was the expensive child (2nd child)
  • Humidity good for Chongqing skin
  • Southern flat face and admire round eye and two-layer eyelid (like to have plastic surgery for correction)
  • Nickname for westerners: big nose or foreigner (Lao Wai)
  • Want egg or round-shape face
  • Like our (North American) ears and small mouth
  • Don’t like to tan / like to keep skin light

Brown, lesser pandas look similar to raccoons:

© 2015 All Right Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie

© 2015 All Right Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie

© 2015 All Right Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie

© 2015 All Right Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie

Food Facts:

  • Chongqing food spicy and numbing
  • Like chilies and black pepper
  • invented hot pot about 100 years ago by poorest (could only afford internal organs which nobody wanted)
  • Now everything goes into hot pot
  • They like duck intestines and Ox belly (stomach)
  • Cooks in seconds
  • Deep fried crickets

Our Guide, Romy’s, Apartment:

  • Cost 7, 8, or 9,000 Yuan per square meter (USD $1166 / $1334 / $1500.00)
  • Her apartment new style, rent 2,000 Yuan per month ($334.00 USD)
  • Has 2 bedrooms (80 square meters)
  • 2 balconies (1 large for the view / the other for laundry)
  • Buy apartment as shell (everything concrete from walls to floors)
  • Need to install everything: kitchen, bathroom / paint, wallpaper
  • Had to hook up to electricity and water (already installed in building)
  • Needed hire a team / buy her own supplies
  • The work took three months
  • 600,000 Yuan for apartment ($100,000. USD)
  • 150,000 Yuan for finishing ($25,000.00 USD)
  • Can own for 70 years only, then renew lease with government
  • Must pay public fee to used elevator + parking space = another 100,000 Yuan (Under $16,000+ USA)
  • Instead can pay 400 Yuan monthly ($67.00 USD)
  • 80% of hi-rises are just a shell

Chinese saying:

Will eat everything swimming in the lake, except a boat.

~ * ~

Additional Information: Baby Panda at Chongqing Zoo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfyCKp-6-44

~ * ~

Next on February 6th, Guilin, Day 17, Part 2: Tea Plantation

For more related posts, click on China tab at the top of the page

© 2015 All Right Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie

Advertisements

Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

84 thoughts on “Chongquin, Day 17, Part 1: Panda Zoo

  1. I would like to see a Panda!!

    Like

  2. At least I didn’t fear (too much) for your life this time. 🙂
    Interesting facts.
    And the little red pandas — at least as ccute as the big ones. :). Hugs

    Like

  3. *Happy clap* I love those pandas–they’re so cute! (And those brown pandas so look like raccoons, wow).

    Like

  4. Whoa, those are some hefty statistics. I think I would watch panda’s all day. 🙂

    Like

  5. So interesting. I was amazed at the size of Chongqing.

    Like

  6. That is a lot of money for the ‘apartment’ that you don’t own. Was she happy with it?

    Like

  7. Wow, that does look like a raccoon. Had you not written that it was a panda, I would’ve assumed it was a raccoon. In a zoo!

    Like

  8. So cute Tess!! What a happy day to see pandas!

    Like

  9. I’m glad you explained the little brown one is also a panda species. Your trip sounds so fascinating, Tess—it’s awesome how you managed to record all the stats and facts. Chongqing is like a country of its own with its population of 32 million! Were you able to join in the tai-chi?

    Like

  10. Very interesting, facts one would never realise until now…love the panda my daughter has been lucky to actually work with a red panda… 😉

    Like

  11. Lovely pictures and interesting facts, I’m sure the quote is perfectly true, I can just imagine it all.

    Like

  12. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    It is that time of the week for our trip through China with the intrepid Tess Karlinski and How the Cookie Crumbles. This week less of a personal description and more of a fascinating fact finding mission. There is so much to learn about this huge country that these facts are incredibly useful.. I particularly liked that the husbands are hen-pecked and the Chinese saying…Will eat everything swimming in the lake, except a boat. This is evidenced by some of the items on the menu…duck intestines…. great read and if you love to travel pack a bag of provisions, put your feet up and read the other 17 days worth of the journey….

    Like

  13. Deep fried crickets! Haven’t ever tried that before. Sounds crispy! Wonderful post thanks for sharing. 🙂

    Like

  14. An awesome trip. Fantastic photos. I’ve never seen a lesser panda before, very cute.
    xxx Massive Hugs xxx

    Like

  15. Couldn’t miss this Tess😊 fascinating info, although i didn’t realise the Chinese limited themselves to eating everything just in the lake, I thought it was anything non human that lives!

    Like

  16. I love the sound of the husbands!

    Like

  17. Great travelogue with lots of interesting facts. Like the one about women looking for men 20 cm taller – guess my daughter would have been considered lucky there – her husband is more than a foot taller than she! I am also fascinated by pandas but had never heard of the lesser panda.

    Like

  18. Fabulous facts and photos! …your certainly Panda to our needs! 🙂

    Like

  19. How do they afford to live Tess?

    Like

  20. A lot of good information here, Tess. The prices for the various things to live sound like New York City or Los Angeles here in the states. I was thinking the panda might be related to the koala bear, but looking at your photos, maybe it is racoon. I think I’ll pass on their cuisine.

    Like

    • The cuisine for poor people. How they survive! I thought the pandas would be much bigger. How big? I have no idea, but still expected they’d be larger. It was a disappointment that we had to be gated so far away from them.

      Like

  21. She looks like a mix between fox and raccoon. Great pictures. Love it!

    Like

  22. Really interesting collection of facts here, I had to keep pausing to digest them and relate them to things I know. Kind of sad to be a creature who is known as the “lesser” anything!

    I’m continually staggered by the amount of information you collected on your trip, you really must have been making copious notes the whole time!

    Like

    • Thank you, Vanessa. Yes, I did take notes of all the information I managed to keep up with. Think the difference between hearing all this information in one day and try to process it. I’m g.l.a.d. I wrote and wrote. I would never remember any of this otherwise. It was information overload, but I’m glad of it. Now I get to take my time with it and share it all. ❤ 🙂

      Like

  23. Lot of info. Just thinking about the size of the city makes my mind boggle. I’m sure I’d seen pictures of the lesser pandas sometime but not sure it had registered. And thinking about having to get everything done before you move into an apartment…

    Liked by 1 person

    • I know. A lot of planning. If memory serves me, this young guide (although hard to tell ages> Under 30 I think), bought the TWO bedroom apartment so her parents could move in with her. The tour business must be good pay. 🙂

      Like

  24. Another wonderful and interesting post, I’m so enjoying them 🙂 Like everyone else, I loved the pandas ❤

    Like

  25. I thought that sweet brown/red panda was a raccoon at first! Who doesn’t love pandas? Only the stone-hearted. Tell me, Tess, do you practice T’ai Chi? I’ve always wanted to take instruction and then head out to a park with a bunch of people and practice it. I love the symmetry of it, the slow, careful movement.

    It must be the crazy Pisces in me. When I tell my husband I want to do this, he just rolls his eyes. 😀

    Like

    • I did take T’ai Chi classes. The first few times I swear everyone heard my joint snap, crackle and pop. I supposed they were listening to their own. After a few classes I can’t believe how I limbered up and the snap, crackle, pop disappeared. I’m one of those people that rushes to get things done. I don’t know how to slow down (except when I write and edit). It soon drove me crazy to slow down because of the movements. I couldn’t relax. Silly, right? Doing T’ai Chi and not relaxing.
      Go try it. It IS good for mind and body and so beautiful to watch. I fell in love with our instructor, who was older than me. Well not in love with him, in love with the way he moved. Breathtaking.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Interesting that we just pick some animals and think ‘How Cute’. When i was a boy we used to go to London Zoo to see Chi-Chi but I don’t remember him being very exciting. Later I bought Panda bears for my children (not real ones of course).

    Like

  27. Very interesting as always Tess 🌻

    Like

  28. Goodness Tess, this is packed with such interesting information! I never knew that Pandas could possibly be related to racoons and I can’t wait to tell my daughter about the lesser brown panda, never heard of such a thing (she is obsessed with racoons and loves Pandas!). Pandas annoy me for some reason, don’t shoot me!!!! Love how you describe the husbands – henpecked – and that the women like their men taller then they, but at least 20cm!! Fascinating to read about all the costs of living over there, even for use of the elevator! Really enjoyed this. And meant to say, I will come back to read your re-blogged E book series, just haven’t had the time but looks so helpful, thanks Tess, you’re doing some great things here on your blog :-)<3 🙂

    Like

    • Pandas aren’t related to raccoons. The lesser pandas sort of looks like one. As well, I find it hard to see a connection between the two, but that’s the story.
      The pandas weren’t what I expected. I thought they’d be bigger, whiter, seen closer. The video at the bottom of the post gives a nice close-up. We were high above them and even if they came close there was still distance.
      I love all the little sayings and thinking of people in different areas. Interesting, isn’t it all?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, It is so interesting, I love your take on life over there, from your perspective. I’ve seen Pandas in zoos but as you say, always from a distance and they don’t strike me as very interesting. They are trying to breed them in a zoo in Edinburgh but to no avail as yet. They are not easy to breed apparantely… :/

        Liked by 1 person

      • The tried breeding them here as well without success. I believe China lend them a pair.

        Liked by 1 person

  29. Pandas! Now we’re cookin’!

    Not that you weren’t cookin’ before. but PANDAS!

    Like

  30. This is so interesting, Tess. I enjoy hearing about everyday life and the challenges of living in another place, and I know very little about that in China. Loved the photos of the pandas. We have red pandas at our zoo, and one of the kids got a little stuffed red panda cuddly toy, so I recognized it right away!

    Like

    • I’m so tickled I took notes and then blogged about this. Now I have a record and can read anytime. I’m still over the moon I had this experience. Thanks so much for your interest, Naomi. I’m pleased a seasoned traveler like you can still find something to enjoy about my trip. ❤ ❤ ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’m taking notes on your notes, Tess, as I still have not been to China and would like to go one day. I appreciate your perspective, and all the fun facts you include.

        Like

  31. I wrote as fast as I could when the tour guides were good and willing to share stories or facts. The amount of information I scribbled surprises me because I was on auto pilot until the cruise. 🙂
    Glad you’re finding things that interest you here. ❤ Thank you, Naomi.

    Like

Some things in life are complicated. Let's keep it simple.

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s