How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE

Chongqing: Day 17, Part 2 – to Guilin Tea Plantation

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I felt rushed through the zoo and we were. Next on the agenda was a local flight to Guilin. We had to get our luggage checked and be ready to board by 11:10 a.m. for an hour flight. There were no unexpected surprises at the airport this time: no wands shrieked, nor gongs rung; no high-pitched voices nor thumping feet. Everyone had packed properly and wore no heavy metal.

A boxed lunch was served on board again, but I don’t recall what had been on offer.

Upon landing, our new tour guide, thirty-something Lily, met us at the airport. She was an attractive young woman, who appeared reserved, but approachable.

  • Population Guilin: 1 million, includes 5 urban districts. Total equals 4.7 million
  • Lots of Limestone mountains
  • Yao Mountain only earth mountain, also the highest

IMG_0615

  • Small buildings only up to five storys high
  • Lakes and two rivers
  • Have 4 seasons
  • Living standard is okay
  • Tourism main source of revenue
  • Tax-free for business
  • Minority regions, tax tree
  • Good transportation
  • Major fashion manufacturers: Shanghai & Kenton
  • Southern port of China

We were surrounded by limestone mountains from the airport to Guilin. What a sight to see.

  • Specialty chili paste: local taste is hot
  • Herbal medicine
  • Fermented tofu
  • Persimmons, kumquats, oranges
  • Local wine (53% made from rice), named: Three Flower
  • Natural wine quarry
  • Local beer: Lee Cham
  • Hometown of local painting
  • Ocean pearls about 300 miles (km) from Guilin
  • 10 army bases present because close to Vietnam border
  • Rice has two crops a year. Ninety percent of rice farmers suffer rheumatism and arthritis

IMG_0603

Frolicking in a tea field. I couldn’t balance the hat on my head.

Tea Quick Facts:

  • Guilin area known for Chinese Tea
  • Tea Institute does research on tea properties (founded in 1965 near Yao Mountain)
  • Same tea bush, different tea from different parts of the bush
  • Tea picking is in the morning
  • Osmanthus tree, a relative of cinnamon (use only flowers not bark for tea)
  • Flower tea: Jasmine, Osmanthus
  • Green tea has caffeine, radiation-resistant for people use computers for long hours
  • White tea regulated and produced in limited quantities for export
  • Oolong tea, you must have clay pot (colour is red but like black tea) but different taste

Tea Disruption

  • Most popular tea? Depends on age and type of job (social standing)
  • Tea for modern people: “Puer” tea compressed into a hard block
  • Puer tea (expensive) you cut off a piece to make tea
  • Puer tea: good for stomach, detox high cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, arthritis, rheumatism and good for losing weight

We were invited to a tea tasting after the tour. I wasn’t fond of much of the tea. One couple liked the Puer tea and bought a box.

~ * ~

Additional Information:

Tea farm outside Guilin:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_Bzr8s45i8

How do they make it? Puer Tea Production:

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6mewXlWlmY

 ~ * ~

Next on February 13th, To Yangshuo: Day 17, Part 3 – Countryside

For more related posts, click on China tab at the top of the page

© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

107 thoughts on “Chongqing: Day 17, Part 2 – to Guilin Tea Plantation

  1. Very interesting tour, thanks for taking us along.

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  2. Wow, look at you in that tea field. Very cool. And, so lush. 🙂

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  3. Liked the photo of you in the tea field. Very interesting. I am liking the tour a lot.

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  4. Tess, that was really interesting. For some reason I always find things about tea fascinating. Hugs! 😀 ❤

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  5. That picture of you in the tea field is so cute! In some of those pics, the sky looks hazy. Was it cloudy or is that pollution?

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  6. Those limestone mountains are impressive, Tess—this was such an interesting tour despite the rush start, etc. And thank you for all the facts on Guilin and the surrounding area! 🙂

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  7. That looks like an interesting tour. The tea plants were beautiful.

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  8. beautiful nature. Was it foggy or smoggy? Hard to tell.

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  9. Wow nice information you presented here! Awesome Post!

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  10. Do they play baseball in those hats?

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  11. Love you in that hat with those spangly earrings…..I learned to enjoy flower teas many years ago, tutored by a certain love of mine. It is an acquired taste….

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  12. Loved the photo of you in the tea field. I had no idea tea grew that way!

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  13. I love tea, drink it all day,, now I can see you making it.. heehee!

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    • 😀 😀 I can make tea alright, but not with as much finesse as the Chinese. It’s an occasion when you drink it there and in some parts, they carry a sealed container and sip it all day long. When it’s gone, they just add more hot water. 🙂

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  14. Oh my!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1 Your story remains me the nice days I spent there in my trip in China! Thanks! I’m wating your words during the 5 hours along Yangshuo river…

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  15. What an interesting day Tess. Who knew that the tea process was so complicated? I love the photo of you in your hat!

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  16. Very interesting! I didn’t know that different teas are made from different parts of the bush.
    Those mountains are impressive.

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  17. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    Time for our fact finding trip to China with our personal guide Tess Karlinski on her How the Cookie Crumble Blog.. this week Chongqing – and some fascinating facts about this region close to the Vietnamese Border and its wonderful tea plantations… enjoy..

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  18. Except for the fact of who’s on the other side of the border there, I think I’d like visiting Guilin. From what you say and show here, it’s more down to earth than the other places you visited thus far.

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  19. That is a FABULOUS picture of you Tess! I would have really enjoyed this tea part of the trip.

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  20. Great photos! Love those mountains! I like your method of giving us lots of info in bullet form.

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    • It’s the best way to put up lots of information so that unnecessary words don’t get in the way. This would have been a l.o.n.g. post otherwise. Glad the bullet style engaged your.
      Thank you for reading and commenting. 🙂

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  21. The place looked quite pretty and the photographs are great. It did sound as though there’s a different work ethic there though with much more outdoor work. It must be fascinating to see another culture so close at hand.
    xxx Huge Hugs xxx

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  22. Fabulous photos and the mountains look pretty impressive, especially the pointy one in the first picture 🙂

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  23. Thank you for the tour, it was lovely to see where my teas originates from as I’m an avid green, chi and spice tea drinker.

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  24. Nice hat. No wonder the farmers get arthritis, trying to balance a conical hat, and pick tea? You are a walking Chamber of Commerce for China. As a big tea fan, this was fun to read.

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  25. Thanks for the tour Tess, that’s a great photo of you 🙂

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  26. I’m really enjoying your trip – i missed a trip to China a number of years ago.

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  27. Love the picture of you in the Tea Fields! The countryside is beautiful, the mountains spectacular. I love the tea tasting, very cool. I am so enjoying touring with you, makes me want to get out my passport and dust it off.

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    • I’ve been fanning myself with my passport–not because it’s hot here–because I’ve an itch to get out there again. Where would YOU like to go?
      Thank you for sticking around for this trip.

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      • Don’t know Tess. I have an itch, but don’t know where to. Unlike you I am far less of a planner, I don’t think I could tour that way. It is my right brain thing, I just like to wander.

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      • A friend has asked me to take a cruise with her. She’s been all over Europe taking river cruises. I’m not sure I want to do that, but I do like her idea of following the tour guides where we find it interesting and exploring on our own.
        I just want to GO. now. It looks like May before we can go as she has other obligations until then. Sigh.

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      • May in Europe is perfect, generally the weather is nice around then in most areas. My parents did some great cruises, both river and sea in Europe, they loved them and never had a bad one. They also did what your friend is suggesting, some guided and some simply off on their own. I think you should go go go

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      • We’ll see how these plans pan out. Thanks for the poke, Val. ❤

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      • I’m a bit of a planner and not a good one at that. Usually I DO fly by the seat of my pants in most things I do. Could be why I don’t accomplish as much as I’d like. XD

        Liked by 1 person

  28. Hi Tess another whirlwind stage of the mammoth Chinese progress. I have definitely learnt a lot about tea. Love your hat and those mountains. 🙂 xxx

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  29. What an interesting and informative travel blog. Thank for the tour and spot of tea.

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  30. You look adorable in the tea field. This would have been a very interesting stop.

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  31. An interesting post, thanks. As a tea drinker (ironically I am sipping coffee, not tea as I write this)! I was fascinated to read about the different teas you encountered. I like Jasmin tea but also enjoy more (traditional) english varities such as english breakfast and Earl Grey. Kevin

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  32. Your journey sounds very interesting. I love blues, turquoise and greens and that’s a perfect picture of you amongst the tea bushes. This sounds absolutely fabulous! Thank you for sharing. I love tea. ❤

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  33. Have been to a coffee plantation, but not a tea one. Should add it to my list of things to see. I am a tea fan and oddly enough, not a coffee fan. I don’t think I’ve ever had a kumquat.

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    • I haven’t seen nor had a kumquat either except in a television commercial quite some time ago. I’d love to go to a coffee plantation. I read a novel about one once and it was fascinating: how the soil produces coffee of different tastes, about growing it, about lots of details I don’t remember anymore. XD

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  34. I love this post, us Brits love our tea! So it was interesting to hear all the tea facts. Love the pic of you in the tea field too. The weather always looks pretty gloomy or wet in most of your China pictures, was that just the season?

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  35. Wow! The mountain looks like something out of The Lord of the Rings.

    Oh, and I dig your hat!

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  36. Love the photo of you ‘frolicking in a tea field’ 🙂 Very unusual scenery, looks quite surreal, almost Dr Suess like, I thought. Interesting visit this one, shame the tea wasn’t very good. Come over to my Summerhouse, I’ll make you a lovely cuppa 🙂 ❤ 😀

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  37. I love your photo here Tess 💞

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  38. Being a tea freak I would have liked that visit to the plantation. I like those mountain shapes! I don’t like WordPress changes!

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  39. How long were you in China? You must have gone end to end. 🙂

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  40. It looks very distinctive. I don’t like tea and never realised about the high rate of illness in the farmers although it makes perfect sense. Like the hat!

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  41. Fun seeing you standing in the field, balancing that huge hat! 😀

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  42. Lovely picture of you frolicking in the tea field, Tess. I love those limestone mountains.

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