How the Cookie Crumbles

Life in the fast and slow lanes after SIXTY-FIVE

Yangshuo: Day 19, Part 1 – to Guilin

30 Comments


Breakfast was meager, the second bad one and the worst of the two. We packed our bags and were downstairs for breakfast by about 7:20. The fried eggs were tough and rubbery; sausages were fine; baked beans (I didn’t try); rolls were hard as in stale. For fruit: only halved bananas (cut ends black); sliced white bread; cereals as usual and milk. Coffee and black tea were good.

Lily admitted breakfast at this hotel wasn’t great. “It is the best hotel in Yangzhou and it is a small city; they try their best.” She added this hotel is large and caters to many Chinese travelers as well in another room. We are in separate rooms or there would be a big mess. Really? What kind? In all previous (and larger) hotels, Chinese  and foreign travelers had breakfast in the same area—no problem—with countless buffet choices for everyone.

Our luggage had to be outside our room by 8:30 a.m. and was picked up at precisely that time. I snooped when I heard activity in the hallway. We’d packed before breakfast and still had about 40 minutes to read and wait for the bus.

Before we leave this hotel, I must share a discovery. Instead of a sink, the bathroom had a wonderful bowl on the counter, but the faucet wasn’t arranged properly and water splashed all over the water as turned on. I heard a strange sound as the water disappeared down the drain. I turned the water off and on again. Same sound. I had to take a look beneath the sink and laughed my head off.

© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

My apologies the picture is somewhat dark: regular pipe leads from the drain as well as through the floor. See the loose plastic tubing in between? It’s just long enough and not secured. I  pulled it out for you to see and wonder if our room was the only one with special plumbing.

© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

The bus ride from Yangshuo back to Guilin again took 1-1/2 hours. “The ride will be bumpy,” Lily said. She grinned and called it a back massage. Thank goodness the bus had padded seats not bare wood planks.

As well as our tour company, Lily also works for another one, which caters to Americans who come to adopt Chinese children. She likes being freelance and enjoys meeting people and hearing their stories.

© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

While on the bus, I observed a woman ride her bike in stocking feet. Her boots were on the handlebars. I noticed my first set of twins alongside another sibling. Till now, we’d seen only singular children and mostly boys. A man washed dirt off his bike next to a mud puddle, scooping water up with his hands. It wasn’t fancy, but appeared efficient. As well, I noticed several times, a female driving a scooter with a male passenger. Yes, believe it, or not. I wonder if this means she makes better money or is a better penny Yuan pincher? It’s obvious she owns the wheels.

I noticed only a couple dogs and a pampered few in the city. In the country, a few dogs slept on a farm we passed on the way to our River Li cruise the day before.

Approximate Costs of Electronics in USD:

  • ($416) iPad mini – 2500 Yuan
  • ($333) Samsung iPhone – 2000 Yuan
  • $833 iPhone5 (very popular) – 5000 Yuan
  • $333 Regular bicycle (a farmer might use) – 2000 Yuan
  • $100 and up Scooter – 600–700 Yuan
  • Hong Kong has best prices for electronics (and cosmetics)

A five-cubic foot freezer is about 2200 Yuan (approximately $360 USD). Back home we can buy one that size for half that amount. Yes, people in the cities have money to spend, but I didn’t hear a reason why it’s so expensive if this popular. Of course, farmers are still behind the times with old washing machines or none, and no freezers. They don’t have electricity anyway.

~ * ~

 A Couple Chuckles, Chinese Style:

When a husband likes shopping, his wife does not.

When you marry the right woman, you are complete. When you marry the wrong one, you are finished.

~ * ~

Next on March 13 – Guilin: Day 19, Part 2 – Out and About

For more related posts, click on China tab at the top of the page

© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

30 thoughts on “Yangshuo: Day 19, Part 1 – to Guilin

  1. How strange the Chinese travelers would eat in a different room than the foreign ones. I wonder what the story behind that is!

    I love that last quote about marrying the right woman. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. We just take so much for granted, don’t we?

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  3. I would have a lot of difficulty not stressing over leaving my luggage in the hallway to be picked up. I’d never trust that would happen. No lost luggage with all those stops?

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  4. Very interesting. I laughed at the plumbing. I thought you were going to point out a bucket under the sink which would have put me over the top.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. I have a feeling that “plumbing” is standard – and cheap. I wonder why the separation of the different tourists? You make this trip so interesting and I love hearing the menus, of course. I’ll be sorry when the trip is over.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Enjoying the adventure stories. Sue
    Womenlivinglifeafter50.com

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Weird form of segregation in the hotel. Wonder what the story is with the female drivers. Always so interesting Tess, thanks for sharing 🌹

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  8. Fells like we are on a mini holiday with you. Loved the chuckles.

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  9. The best hotel I ever stayed in was Traders in Kuala Lumpur. The dining room was huge and there must have been about a dozen different cuisines to choose from and no ‘mess’ at all. I hope you’re saving for your next trip because we all love your style of travel writing Tess ❤

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  10. I have to say that you have not really tempted me to visit China!

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  11. As a hospitality “specialist” who never travels, I loved this!

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  12. When you marry the wrong one… Oh dear 😒 loved the ‘unique’ plumbing. Thank you again for your holiday journal. Hugs xx

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  13. About the luggage, I’ve been in some package holidays, and in some hotels we had to leave the baggage beside our room, and when one travels must respect the rules. China for me is wonderful, of course we mustn’t compare it with the countries we live, I didn’t sleep in Yangshuo I went there by boat,- had lunch there- for five hours and then we came back to Guillin the same day . I’ve travelled a lot and each trip had nothing to do with the others. I am wainting for the next!!!!!!!!!!

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  14. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    It is time for the weekly tour through China with Tess Karlinski and this week Yangshuo… rubbery eggs, drainage problems and expensive electronics… fascinating series and to be fair has given me a completely different perspective on China, its people and its culture…thans Tess

    Liked by 1 person

  15. It sounds like the beginning of another interesting day, Tess. Though that sink could be “interesting” in the wrong way. I was scared to death what you were going to find “making a strange sound.” LOL! And relieved when it was just an odd plumbing configuration.
    > Lily sounds like she could be a good book character. Maybe one day you’ll create a heroine inspired by her.
    Mega-hugs and thanks for sharing this adventure. ❤ 😀

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  16. Yes, I think you had us all wondering what you were going to find…Lily must have quite a few stories to tell. It’s amazing to think life can be so different in different places in this day and age.

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  17. Tess that is quite the plumbing situation! Always fascinating who we meet as we travel isn’t it? A new character for your writing perhaps?

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  18. Marry the wrong woman and you are finished…made me laugh oud loud. Good one.

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  19. I’m surprised you saw any dogs seeing that dog meat is used in their cuisine. Your breakfast does sound like it was less that what us westerners are use to. My sister-in-law (Chinese-Indonesian) would have cut the black off the bananas and used a microwave oven to soften the bread.

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  20. That’s sad about the segregation of travelers. Part of traveling is so we can meet and mingle and learn of one another’s ways and customs. Do you think the Chinese in the other room wanted to mingle with the travelers in your eating room?

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  21. Quite an interesting hotel–definitely a DIY in the plumbing and cooking department.

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  22. I’m thinking you should make a travel book? Oh, and don’t forget the sink pictures, lol. ❤

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  23. I always love your travel entries, Tess. You notice the most interesting details.

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  24. So you got wet feet everytime you washed your hands? Good that you could laugh about it 😉 Another fasciinating account of your trip, and eye-opener to this very different culture and the way ‘things are done’. Love how you show us the prices of ‘stuff’. And did you ever find out why you were seperated from the Chinese for the buffet? Very odd that… 😮 Great post once again Tess, thank you for a great read 🙂 😀 ⭐

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  25. I’m not sure what you found so funny. That’s the same way I would’ve installed a sink.

    My wife doesn’t let me do plumbing any more.

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  26. I like the outdoor pics. I would not be happy about the breakfast. My typical breakfast is a protein shake and banana. So when I get out for breakfast I really enjoy it! The sink was also interesting!!

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