How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE

Guilin, Day 19, Part 3 – Elephant Trunk Park

47 Comments


I can’t recall when our bus changed from a 12-passenger to a full sized for our tiny group of eight. (Yangshuo or Guilin?) Honest. A full-sized bus! Made us feel special I suppose. After lunch we headed to Elephant Trunk Park. It was a good day for a slow walk around but soon became boring as we stayed longer than we needed. This time, Chinese girls took a particular liking to Ernesto and begged to be photographed with him. By now we knew they like to have pictures taken with the foreigners.

Quick Facts:                           

  • Guilin is not a big city: population only about 1 Million
  • Guilin has 2 rivers and 4 lakes
  • International football academy is here
  • Strawberries and Calamondin (I think). They look like tiny oranges)
  • Lots of foreigners have come to Guilin since 1980
  • Plenty of open spaces / large parks (pay fee) and small ones (free)
  • Many nurseries along the highway / lots of peach trees
  • 90% who come, like it
  • The River Li divides the city into east and west
  • Taxi costs 10 Yuan anywhere (about $1.66 USD)
  • Garbage is collected every single day
  • Biggest pollution from cars and factories, not from garbage

  • Recycling done carefully
  • Some garbage incinerated
  • Government provides rat poison if required
  • Rats not a problem in city
  • In country, rats still eaten
  • Welfare for people who cannot work, but a tiny amount
  • Chinese (Welfare) Lottery is illegal but people buy tickets
  • Selling lottery tickets only allowed if portion goes to social / charity endeavors
  • Ticket sellers probably give just enough to stay under the radar
  • Income taxes: 5% for regular people / 10% for the rich
  • No land taxes because you don’t own the land, but must pay to renew 70-year lease
  • Farmers trust their wells because it’s free
  • Wells do not get tested at all
  • Water supplied by government / cost per amount used like in Canada

After the park we finally unloaded our luggage and checked out the new hotel. My apologies for the fuzzy pictures. The girl is from a particular ethnic minority, but I’m not sure which one.

More Quick Facts

  • Banyan Trees
  • Streets edged by Camphor trees (smell nice and keep bugs away)
  • Cannot make money in this city
  • Government pays to keep out pollution and manufacturing
© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles (hotel courtyard)

Dinner:

  • Ying and Yang soup (egg white and green tea for design)
  • Dumplings
  • Panko dipped spring rolls
  • Soy and chili sauces for dipping
  • Carp with celery, water chestnuts and cucumber
  • Celery, water chestnuts and pearl onions
  • 3 large (pork balls surrounded by sliced cucumber (centre uncooked)
  • battered and spiralled eggplant
  • Batter-dipped chestnuts, deep-fried
  • White rice
  • Orange wedges in skins
© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles (The soup)

Our dinner restaurant had many rooms. The waitress wore something like Bluetooth technology and carried on a conversation with someone as she delivered food. The farther south we went, the angrier the conversations sounded.

Someone cut a piece from one (of three) of the huge pork balls for a taste. The next person cut through the centre revealing raw pork. We all looked at each other. What to do? Finally, the waitress came back serving a nearby table. We waved her over and explained about the raw meat. She continued her funning conversation in the sphere and stopped long enough to inform us it was not raw. She picked up a fork and mashed the pork ball till it flattened. “Is okay.  Is okay. Is okay.” Her voice had escalated until it sounded like yelling (maybe scolding). Smacking down the fork, she left in a huff. Needless to say, no-one touched the pork.

No doubt about it, the pace has slowed from the initial fast pace 19 days before.

~ * ~

Next on April 3rd. Day 20, Part 1 – Flight to Guangzhou

For more related posts, click on China tab at the top of the page

© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

 

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

47 thoughts on “Guilin, Day 19, Part 3 – Elephant Trunk Park

  1. Cool yin and yang dish. Also, thanks for the facts on garbage. Good measure of a place, how they handle garbage.

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  2. The yin yang is cute, but pork not cooked properly? They must be crazy! Did you try the carp, what’s it like?

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  3. Ironically, something similar happened at a restaurant here. We ordered a dish and the fried pork of the dish was not only half raw, it was greasy tasting. When I called the waitress over, she told me the pork was not raw. I told her it was raw, greasy, and nasty smelling. She grabbed one of the forks off the table and began using it to go through the food and slammed the fork down and said, is okay. is okay and stormed off. I followed after her and said, ning sheng culu (you are rude). She looked at me funny and I handed her the plate of food. and then pointed at the food – choulou – ugly food. She screamed at me and I thrust the food at her. I told her in English because I knew she understood and loudly enough other people heard: you are rude. your food is nasty. We will never return here. you are rude….apparently, it is a Chinese thing. I have had more problems with rudeness from Chinese than I ever had from any other nationality.

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  4. Their income tax is quite low. Maybe because the wages are, too?

    That Ying and Yang soup looks too pretty to eat!

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  5. I think I would have eaten everything but that raw pork. I am surprised at the rudeness – something learned from the tourists?

    Liked by 1 person

  6. The ying yang dish is very artistically beautiful. Lot of interesting info about a foreign lifestyle. Thanks, Tess. 🙂

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  7. Tess, a fabulous Friday travelogue!
    The pork ball makes me think of Passport Mini Cooper telling me my 1 year old car is *supposed* to blow cold air when the heat is on, and smell like it’s burning. Maybe the waitress could work for them.
    I’m glad there were other things on the menu. The yen/yang soup is really pretty. Hugs! ❤

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    • My hairdresser was in a restaurant with the family during March Break. The food came cold. It was pasta. She told the waitress and was told they serve the pasta at room temperature. What? Customer service is going down the tubes faster than a snake into a tunnel.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. What a fabulous trip! The video was great––loved the music! I enjoyed the pictures as well. Very creative dishes. Thanks for sharing! 😀

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  9. Nice tour. I had to laugh on the pork. No way Jose. The skies, were they overcast or was that pollution?

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  10. Boy that culture thing really rears an ugly head at times. I don’t know about raw pork. It’s not the flavor–I’d worry about trichinosis. The pictures, though looked great!

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  11. Oh, love the rock formations, the cherry blossoms, everything…and the facts. Thank you, I love it, more! 🙂
    And now I want Chinese food…really badly. 🙂

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  12. You’re packing a ton of stuff into these posts, Tess – amazing ! 🙂

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  13. That is quite the ying and yang dish Tess. I admire how well you kept notes on the trip. this is an area I really need to work on.

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  14. I also liked the Ying Yang dish and the music. I’m not sure if it’s a cultural thing or they are not used to people complaining… I’m pleased the pace seemed to have slowed down as at some points I worried you’d all end up exhausted. Camphor trees sound interesting…

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  15. I liked Guilin very much, I didn’t visit the Elephant Park well for me.. as you say it’s not worthwhile, but I enjoyed a lot in the cruise to Yanghsuo, I’m travelling with you… it seems it’s my second trip to China!!!!!!!!

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  16. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    The tour through China continues with a stop in Guilin and a rather interesting encounter with a raw pork ball and stroppy waitress! As always a terrific article by Tess Karlinski

    Liked by 1 person

  17. The soup does look interesting but strangely not appetising. I wouldn’t be able to hold myself back if a waitress did that in front of me, how rude! The courtyard looks beautiful. Guilin only a small place then…. 😉 thank you T for another informative and colourful post.

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  18. Love the photos and dicription and facts. The angry sounding conversations sound right to me and the scolding the Chinese do not take criticism well. When ever I hear my brother in law talking to my nephew or any of his relatives the conversation always sounds like an excited escalating row.!!

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  19. Raw pork is not a great idea. I went to a modern restaurant once that served rare pork. For some reason (alcohol probably) I ordered it and then left it!

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  20. Tessa… the shoot of the girl in the hotel is from the Miao Etnic and sometimes are colled “The Silver Princess”, the rest of the photos are good.

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  21. Dear Tess,

    I love the yin yang dinner entrée! I also love all the information that you pack into a post. I don’t eat sushi, and I real have to draw the line at raw pork. I am impressed with the extensive touring that you did on this trip–places I haven’t even heard of. I’ve never been closer to Asia than Istanbul, and hope to before too long, so I am eating this up with a spoon–or should I say chopsticks?

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  22. The Yin Yang dish looks quite artistic. What an odd way for a waitress to handle the food. Always interesting, Tess 🙂

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  23. I am not much a a traveler so I’ve been reading your China posts with fascination and without the slightest hint of envy. But Guilin looked pretty appealing.

    Then you came to the pork anecdote…

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  24. Raw Pork? Thank goodness that was detected, very dodgy that. Sounds like the waitress was more than a little distracted. Guilin looks very nice and I do like the idea of Camphor trees lining the streets, fresh and clean 🙂 Love the Ying Yang soup, very clever. Another fascinating glimpse of your time in China this Tess, always look forward to reading the next stage in your many and varied adventures! Happy reading 🙂 ❤ ⭐

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    • The farther south we moved, the people were less polite and the language sounded (Cantonese) a lot rougher, stronger and angry.
      Time for coffee… Hope you get some relaxation in today as well. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • Fascinating that. I did manage to get some in Tess, thank you…and then did a huge pile of ironing :/ Still, very satisfying when all done 🙂 Hope your weekend was as restful as you hoped ❤

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  25. The raw pork was bad enough. Having someone pick up my fork and smash my food and tell me ‘is good is good’ would have had me singing ‘is not is not’ !!! 🙂

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  26. Great information on the city itself. The soup was quite pretty, the pork oh no. What is up with rude wait staff? Camphore trees, I found them in quite a few places, always loved them and wished I could grow them here.

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  27. whether it is wild chickens?

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  28. Even when you are relaying that things have slowed down, it is still so much fun to read! The photos are wonderful, don’t mind the odd bit of blur here or there! Such an interesting place this is! ❤️🌸💜❤️🌸

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  29. i see some yummy food 😉

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