How the Cookie Crumbles

Life and scribbles on the far side of SIXTY-FIVE

Day 20, Part 1 – Flight to Guangzhou

50 Comments


Luggage had to be outside our rooms at 10:00 p.m. the night before. The wake-up call jangled at 5:15 a.m. and we rushed to breakfast soon after 5: 30.

Breakfast

  • fried eggs (had to wait for hot steamer refill: were rubbery)
  • Coffee, watermelon, cantaloupe, bananas
  • buns, strawberry jam
  • sausage (no knives for sausage or jam)

Breakfast is normally at 6:30 a.m. Who can eat this early in the morning? I suppose the offerings weren’t bad (though limited variety) considering the English eight and the French group (about 30 people) were the only early risers. We had to leave for the airport by 6:20 for an 8:00 a.m. flight. I guess the next breakfast crowd will have our leftovers.

I noticed the landscape changing on the way to the airport: less mountainous or maybe just smaller mountains.

Lily, our guide, has an apartment in Guilin where she lives with her husband and nine-year-old daughter. They must be doing well enough because she mentioned she bought an apartment in town for her parents. Her husband works at the airport, she didn’t specify his job, but confirmed he is not a pilot when someone asked.

Quick Facts

  • Nissan: most popular Japanese car in Guilin (light and good on gas)
  • Costs less than $20,000 USD
  • Insurance per year: $800.00 (imagine that)

The flight was uneventful this time. Upon our arrival at Guangzhou, a new tour guide awaited by the name of Helen. We guessed her age as fifty-something.  She later introduced our bus driver as Mr. Li though he appeared to be in his mid-thirties or so. After landing, the ladies needed the Happy House, but the first two washrooms were full. We continued towards baggage claim and found one which wasn’t busy.

Guangzhou Quick Facts

  • Population: 20 million
  • Area: 11,000 square kilometers
  • Third biggest city in China next to Shanghai and Beijing
  • They have no winter
  • Three seasons
  • Spring all year round
  • Also known as flower city / spring city
© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles  (Stairway to Five Goats Sculpture)

  • Agricultural city and market: fresh fruits, vegetables, chickens etc.
  • Restaurants crowded with local people / prefer eating out to cooking
  • Many restaurants
  • Tea enjoyed three times a day
  • Eat two meals a day
  • 100-year old lunch restaurant is best restaurant
  • Lots of steps because the building here are old
  • Busy shopping area
  • Have best wood for coffins
  • Long ago locals had a poor life / lived and slept on the river in boats
  • Main occupation was shipping
  • Pearl River is the fifth longest: 2,129 km

Another full-sized bus for us. Of course, I agree, we’re special. Off we drove to Goat Park

© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

The story goes: five goats from heaven brought five types of grain, presented it to the locals, and taught them how to grow them. Grateful, the people built the Five Goats Temple. Read more about it here.

~ * ~

Next on April 10th, Guangzhou, Day 1, Part 2

For more related posts, click on China tab at the top of the page

 

© 2015 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

50 thoughts on “Day 20, Part 1 – Flight to Guangzhou

  1. Tess, i feel your frustration with the pictures and technology. But it is still an interesting and entertaining post. Interesting about the goats too. Goats can be so funny… Hugs! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  2. “Have best wood for coffins”—Ha, now there’s something you don’t hear everyday!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I’m sorry, did you say Goat Park?

    I may need to go to China.

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  4. Love all the cultural facts you always include. What differences there are!

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  5. Oh the challenges of technology. I’m visiting my Mom in the middle of the prairies and the elusive wifi or even cell coverage makes me grateful for my home connection. 🙂

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  6. Doesn’t it make life interesting… 😉

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  7. So are you saying that $800 is expensive or cheap? 🙂

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  8. Let’s hope you can retrieve the pictures to add to your wonderful descriptions.

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  9. I wasn’t in Guangzhou during my trip, I hope you liked it, however I have a pps. I can send you… I like China very much and I enjoy reading you

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  10. Frustrating the pictures, I am certain it is a glitch. Even without them Tess, interesting and fun to follow you through your travels. Coffins? Is this something to be known for?

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    • Still can’t get at them. They’re on the darn iPad. I can see them. Must wait till I can grab my granddaughter. I hate all this waiting and frustration because I’m obviously not doing something right. The rest of my pictures are on my laptop. Can’t understand why this bunch didn’t transfer. There may be more I missed. o_O

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  11. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    This week’s transfer and arrival to Guanzhou in China by the intrepid Tess Karlinkski… not to miss the Five Goats Temple…

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Beautiful – thank you for sharing your wonderful journey. I remember Guanzhou when I got there in 1986 but you have shared so much more. 🙂 I need to go back.

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  13. I hope you find your pictures….

    I like how you said tea “enjoyed three times a day”. Not “drank three times a day”. It makes it sound like pleasant moments. So far I’m torn between thinking life there is very difficult, then I read something and think life there is very good….. I too love the tidbits you give us of every place you go.

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  14. The city sounds better off economically. Batesville, GA is known for their caskets. It makes sense that such an industry would be mentioned. Obviously lucrative, gives jobs for the economy, a necessary business. they must have a lot of strong, straight trees in the area. The people used to live on the river….now it seems they are better off financially and other ways. and I like tea is enjoyed….not taken, or they drink tea three times but enjoy….that means leisure time and money for tea buns etc,. And they prefer eating out to cooking – that means money as well. Finding out all these things is so very interesting! You certainly have kept us entertained and informed with this trip.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Don’t laugh too hard, I’m entertained as well. So many things I’ve forgotten and they are new again. I marvel how much I wrote considering my hands couldn’t even hold a pen the first few days because I don’t write anymore. Who does? 🙂

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  15. Your descriptions and words cast images in my mind as I read so not to worry about your photo snafu. 🙂

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    • My granddaughter is an 11-year-old whiz. I finally caught up with her and she found the pictures. For some reason they were re-ordered when I deleted some older pictures and folders were all different. Grrr. I m.u.s.t. learn to slow down. Will be post a few pictures pertaining to this last post in a wee bit.
      Thanks for continuing to read and comment, Paulette. Always nice to see you. 🙂

      Like

  16. Spring all year, how nice! I wonder if it looks the same as in your lovely photo all year round with all those pretty flowers? Looks very balmy with the short sleeves and sleeveless tops. You certainly travelled a lot on this tour, I’m having trouble keeping up! I sense though that things were calming a bit for you at this stage of the holiday 🙂 Is $800 a lot to you for car insurance, or cheap? I’m not sure what that is in UK sterling, but it sounds like a heck of a lot! The goats are strange aren’t they? Another fascinating travel post, thanks Tess! Hope you are having a lovely weekend and a lovely day tomorrow 🙂 ❤ 🐻

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  17. I could handle eternal Spring. I eat two meals per day now. That part of the culture wouldn’t bother me in the slightest.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Another brilliant travelogue! xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

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  19. Guangzhou sounds like a really intersting city. I’m already looking forward to more content about it 🙂

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  20. Interesting about the seasons. I didn’t know there was a place in China that had such a situation.

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  21. I knew Guangszhou as Canton. Did you have trouble with the humidity there? It always seemed to be raining. Great pictures, as always.

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  22. Sorry about the pictures 😦 but another so interesting post. I especially love the Goat story ❤ I thought it was just me that had trouble with a pen in hand – I used to write really nicely!

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  23. Tess, you gotta love a goat park and fable. The park doesn’t look so baaaaaad. ~James

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  24. I have been going to Guangzhou for 20 years for business and love the food and the people but have never once seen the sun, it is a very dull glow up in the sky! It is amazing how much it has changed over the years and I am pleased that they now drink a lot of red wine, but I will be happier once they stop serving it cold and mixing it with lemonade! Love your posts, keep them coming!

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  25. Loved the goat sculpture. Such intricate and amazing detail! So far, sounds like the part of your trip I might enjoy the most.

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  26. When my kids were small, we used to spend vacation at a farm-resort set-up. My favorite animals were the goats. Highly interactive and responsive creatures, especially when they were hungry and we had food. 😉 (Yes. We were encouraged to feed the animals. The farm owners provided bags of leftover guest food for the critters.)

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  27. Always springtime sounds ideal. I’m also not sure if you think the insurance is expensive or cheap. In the UK it varies very much depending on many things (place, type, age…). I was lucky enough to get to your post when the pictures were up. Love the goats too.

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    • Till I complained and complained to my insurance broker (I am retired after all), I was paying almost $1,900.00 a year for insurance. I don’t drive as much anymore, nor go far. It didn’t make sense. Still, the province I live in is the most expensive in my country. If I could pay $800 per year for insurance, I would throw a party. 🙂

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  28. loved that colourful flowers 😉

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  29. Tess, I love traveling with you and plan to peruse your earlier posts about your China trip. Were you thinking of your readers when you took all the notes, or were you saving info for yourself?

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  30. Thank YOU, Sharon. No, I had no specific plans. I hadn’t traveled in almost 20 years and always to a beachy type holiday, except for Cuba. I had no interest in going anywhere and thought it was a waste of money. When I saw our itinerary, I knew I’d have to take some notes because I’d forget everything about my trip. I hadn’t planned on copious notes but found I took them every chance I got. So, so glad I did. At first my handwriting was terrible because I keyboard mostly. Who writes anymore? Keyboarding is easier on my hands so writing was difficult at first, but improved with practice. A year later, and I can barely sign my name again.

    I DID think I’d find something to share on my blog, but had no idea I’d have this much material and am grateful for the note-taking because I get to enjoy it all over again in a more leisurely fashion. Both the lady I traveled with and I don’t easily recall some of the things we did although I wrote about them in my notebook.

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  31. I liked the goat legend.

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