How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE

Day 22 (cont’d) Hong Kong

60 Comments


To reach Hong Kong Island, we traveled through Cross Harbor Tunnel which is more than 1.5 kilometer long and underwater. Yes, all that water overhead played with my mind too.

Quick Facts:

  • Easter weekend, a four-day public holiday (Good Friday to Easter Monday)
  • Good time for citizens to travel to other countries and to China.
  • Public workers, hotel workers must work.
  • Service industries; all stories are open
  • Office workers get holiday
  • Students have two-week school holiday

Zeelo, the new local guide met us after we had been processed where we’d seen the wine.. Some guides don’t talk close enough to the mic and others, like this one, talked too close. I found him difficult to understand.

The tallest building here turned out to be our 118-storey hotel. Factories used to populate this area but have been moved to China. Zeelo took care our registration. Meanwhile, Clovis, the French guide, took an extraordinary long time explaining how to get around during our free time for the rest of the day.

Impatient, someone in our group raised a voice. “Why does he always spend so much time explaining to the French? What about us?”

When he finished, Clovis apologized, and began again in English about the subway system. Neither Sue nor I planned to take that kind of adventure. She burned to hear about opportunities within walking distance of the hotel and asked lots of questions about shopping. Our room keys ready, Sue and I and RJ and his wife, dragged our luggage to the elevator. They invited us to see the lights with them. I accepted.

No sooner had we entered our room on the 30th floor and rolled the luggage inside, Sue made ready to go exploring. Was I coming? No. I needed my feet up and quiet for a while.

With no (paid) lunch on our schedule, I had two Fibre bars, drank water and relaxed. Then, I wandered down to the lobby for wifi to contact my daughter. A couple work stations were provided but they were in use. Lucky I brought my own laptop.

Four main parts to Hong Kong:

  • Hong Kong Island: means fragrant harbor or port (former British City)
  • Kowloon (means nine dragons)
  • New Territories
  • Outlying Islands

RJ, his wife and I walked a short distance to catch the subway to see the Symphony of Lights in Kowloon. Signs were in English and Chinese. To buy a ticket for the subway, a machine I’d compare to an ATM, is available at intervals. You choose your destination on a touch screen map, are instructed the cost, feed in the money and out pops a ticket. You then swipe the ticket on entry and turn it in on exit. The wait wasn’t long, street signs were displayed everywhere. We arrived without incident. I noticed women didn’t have iPhones, only men and the younger generation, similar to home.

We passed bands and singers dressed to the T’s as we strolled down to Avenue of Stars and soon the area filled up with spectators, mostly Chinese.

As soon as someone moved and / or a space opened up beside me it was immediately filled. I don’t like crowds at the best of time and certainly not in a foreign country. A little elbow room keeps me happy.

© Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8. All Rights Reserved.

© Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8. All Rights Reserved.

Next up June 5th: Hong Kong, Day 23 (second last day)

For more related posts, click on China tab at the top of the page

© 2015Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles. All Rights Reserved.

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

60 thoughts on “Day 22 (cont’d) Hong Kong

  1. Nice skyline and interesting architecture. Enjoyed the post. 🙂

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  2. The lights are beautiful. And i’m sure the harbor had its own magic. But I’m with you about wanting elbow room.
    Huge hugs. 😀

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  3. So exotic. Thanks for sharing.
    Melinda

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  4. I imagine by this time you’re starting to be ready to get home, especially with the crowds.

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  5. I was in Hong Kong in the 90’s. I could see our plane in the reflection of the buildings. The lights were beautiful then. These are spectacular.

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  6. Fascinating and that last photo is particularly stunning!

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  7. That’s interesting that Easter is a four-day holiday, considering most Chinese aren’t Catholics. Hmm…

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  8. I always like to use a subway or an underground. So exciting!

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  9. This sounds like somewhere I’d like to visit, I always thought I’d like to go to Hong Kong! I like the photo of the two of you with the water and skyline behind you.

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  10. It’s great to see a photo of you Tess ❤

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  11. I have good memories of Christmas in Hong Kong in 1978. We stayed in the Excelsior which, at the time, was the biggest hotel on the island. My son was five at the time, and when he opened his gift from the hotel’s Santa, a pair of plastic binoculars, he noticed they were broken and, in the way only a five-year-old can, said on top of his voice, “You can see they were made in Hong Kong, Daddy, they’re broken already!”

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  12. I do like the hazy, misty but warm pictures,, you obviously had a great time…

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  13. What a fascinating place, I would really love to visit Hong Kong, great to read about it through your eyes. I feel just as nervous going through the ‘Chunnel’ on the Eurostar train between the UK and France, more than a little nervous at all that water overhead… 😮 And Easter is a four day holiday here too. I’m with you on the crowds too. Have a great weekend Tess 🙂 ❤

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  14. I love Hong Kong and would like to go back some day. I’ve never seen the Symphony of Lights though, so really enjoyed the photos.

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  15. Fabulous photos … Hong Kong is an amazing place , my sister used to live there ! ❤

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  16. The lights of Hong Kong are spectacular. It was nice you were with someone else who could take a picture of you. It´s odd that women didn´t have iPhones though. All the Asian women I know have at least one iPhone and are always on it.

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    • I should have said, like North American and European women, the Asian women I know all have cell phones and use them in public. Perhaps the women in Hong Kong are too polite to use their cell phones in public.

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  17. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    One of my favourite days of the week when I get to visit China with Tess Karlinski.. for the last few months she has been sharing this mammoth trip which has been fascinating and today she is in Hong Kong where she is part of a huge crowd for the Festival of Lights.. Thanks Tess your detailed journal has saved me a fortune in airfares!

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  18. Thank you for letting us follow you on your journey, Tess. It looks like a light explosion, but too crowded for me, I don’t mind big cities, but really big cities are a another story.
    Hope this day treats you kindly and can’t wait for more posts. 🙂

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  19. That place looks BUSY, enjoy the photography though.

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  20. I love the colors of the lights. After all of the ‘rural’ settings this was sure different. I can’t believe the trip is almost over Tess…..

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  21. Fascinating…I appear to have missed a lot…bad Granny!

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  22. Lovely photographs, Tess.

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  23. Tess the lights of the buildings are incredible! I would love to see that in person.
    I must also say I think it so great that you and Sue gave each other the freedom to do your own thing. Often disasters of travel happen when people don’t give each other space and flexibility.

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  24. Thanks for bringing me back to Hong Kong. I visited there once, about a decade ago, and it was too crowded for me to ever want to re-visit. Fascinating place, but give me some room to roam, as you mention…

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    • I can’t say I’d want to return but it was well worth the experience. I would have like to enjoy some of the nightlife but much too tired at the end of the day.
      Thanks for traveling along with me and commenting too. ❤ ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  25. Another wonderful journey without moving from my computer 🙂 and some great photos too. Thanks, Tess ❤

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  26. Although I’ve been in hotels in large cities where there’s more than just ten stories (was on the 56th floor once), that hotel you stayed in looks so skinny. Does it sway when the wind blows?

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  27. I loved Hong Kong, each time I visited though like you I didn’t love the crowds. Glad you finally got some pictures of you in there! What a wonderful trip you took, where are you going next?

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  28. My sister just retire but I’m having trouble coordinating our calendars. She’s the problem. 😀 -D 😀

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  29. I’ve never been to Hong Kong; the photos are great, love all the lights. I’m not wild about crowds either, like a little personal space. Sounds like an awesome trip.

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  30. I’ve never met someone named Clovis before.

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  31. It looks spectacular although I suspect is not a place where you’re often in peace and quiet. Must get overwhelming at times.

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    • I agree. Too many people>
      Same think happened when we visited old Macau. One alley way we exited had hip-to-hip people. Our guide just kept on walking and got so far ahead of us, she raised her flag straight overhead so we could find her. That was scary too.

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  32. Another great post! I lived in HongKong for four months in the 1980s and loved it so much. Thank you for sharing this post. I returned a few times, but HongKong was was never the same. Your story and pictures take me back to many beautiful memories. ❤

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  33. I’m pleased this brings back good memories. Thank you for tagging along on this tour. ❤ ❤ ❤
    BTW, might you share your first name?

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  34. We visited Hong Kong in 2013 — felt the same way about the crowds that you describe. It’s amazing how much is packed into that tiny space. Must have been cool to be in that tall, tall hotel.

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  35. The hazy feel to the pics remind me somehow of old movies. Looks wonderful. What an adventure!

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  36. I wonder if it isn’t my iPad mini that’s to blame or take credit. I’m no photographer. I’m surprised I remembered to take pictures at all. Lots of the ones I’ve shared are another fellow travelers.
    Thanks for reading, Susan, and following.

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  37. The crowdedness would really get to me too.

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  38. Stunning sights and architecture. And, I knew you’d have to put your feet up at some point. 🙂

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  39. Think you went to the wrong place for elbow room, Tessa!

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  40. 😀 😛 😛 You’re right! Who knew?

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  41. Beautiful pictures! I wish we got a four day holiday for Easter!

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