How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE

Hong Kong, Day 23

42 Comments


On our way back from the light show the night before, we had no trouble getting on the subway. One lady offered her eight or ten-year-old daughter’s  seat for RJ. His wife had found a seat, but he and I hugged poles.

A pictorial on the wall notes illustrated one should give up a seat to the elderly, the disabled and pregnant women. RJ’s hair color was a dead giveaway. Mine is colored. Maybe that’s why he was offered the seat first. Since he refused, I was next in line. The woman persisted. I sat down.

At our stop, we passed a Seven Eleven (seems these are popular here) and thought we knew where we were until we passed another one. A young couple approached and gave directions in wonderful English.

~ * ~

Breakfast hadn’t been half as nice as our previous morning in Macau at the Sheraton. We later surmised there were more restaurants in the 118-storey hotel; ours a lowly one with disappointing offerings.

Sue and I liked arriving early expecting everything will be fresh. We were the first of our group and misinterpreted the greeter’s actions when she purposely knocked over a couple folded and steepled serviettes. A strange look crossed her face when we sat, but she made no comment. Chinese people a row over kept staring at us. When more of our group arrived they were prompted to sit in another section where only Caucasians were seated. Oops. Was this a faux pas? Had we broken some rule by sitting in the ‘Chinese’ area?

My breakfast:

  • Dry croissant and bun with orange marmalade and strawberry jam
  • A plateful of watermelon, cantaloupe and pineapple with whipped cream (yummy)
  • One sausage and a hard-boiled egg
  • 3 cups of coffee (quite good)

Our bus driver stopped around 9:30 a.m. for our 10-minute bathroom break and a walk around at a couple tourist shops in Golden Bauhinia Square. Notice the huge golden flower bauhinia.

Smoked pigs are offered on platters as a gift to Tin Hau who protects fishermen and ensures plentiful fish. The Goddess of the Sea Ceremony is like a grand opening of a cruise ship for the Chinese. More images here.

China Daily Asia official channel

Quick Facts:

  • 272 outland islands
  • Still keeps border separating from China
  • Need visa to cross to China from Hong Kong
  • Population over seven million
  • 1980 nothing here but farmers
  • Kept English names of streets and places
  • Army no longer in Hong Kong / comes from China
  • Police govern Hong Kong. Keep own laws
  • Don’t need cars to live here
  • Lots of taxies (red with gray roofs), buses, subways
  • Cheap transportation
  • Not much parking provided at work
  • Lots of toll booths

We continued on to Longevity Beach at Repulse Bay. What were we supposed to do here? We couldn’t swim. A Seven Eleven beckoned across the road. No thanks.

Sue spied color and people in the distance, which looked like a festival. We decided to walk down to see what was happening and were startled by a handsome young local (25 – 30-ish), showering outdoors (yes in his bathing suit) slathering on soap as if he needed it. I hope he hadn’t noticed me blush. His English was quite good and he asked all the usual questions: where were we from, what were we doing there etc.

We continued on and happened upon Tin Hau Temple with hordes of people making offerings. (I know I had taken pictures there, but found none on my iPad.) Soon we had to return to the bus.

~ * ~

Next on June 13th Hong Kong, Day 23 (cont’d.)

For more related posts, click on China tab at the top of the page

© 2015Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles. All Rights Reserved.                                                                       

Advertisements

Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

42 thoughts on “Hong Kong, Day 23

  1. Many Americans, concerned with American prejudices, don’t realize just how much exists in other countries. A real eye opener.

    Seems like every temple expects donations.

    Like

  2. Thank you for letting us travel with you, Tess, so kind of you to share your memories. 🙂

    Like

  3. Fascinating differences. But a beach and a “bathing beauty” — it had to be a good day. 😀 Mega hugs!

    Like

  4. You protocol-breaker, you. Sitting in the wrong section. Atta girl. 😉

    Like

  5. Travel can leave one in interesting situations like yours at breakfast where you know you have done something not q

    Like

  6. cont…quite right but you have no idea what to make of it. I’m not so keen on the idea of smoked pigs as the offerings. Hopefully the gods are meat eaters. 🙂

    Like

  7. Sorry I hit the post button too soon…..cont…..quite right but you are not exactly sure what that might be. I’m not sure I like the idea of the smoked pigs. Hopefully the gods are big meat eaters. 🙂

    Like

  8. Nice tour. I can see you as Rosa Parks integrating the Chinese sections. Why to the beach indeed. I guess watching someone soap down had to be embarrassing.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Thank you for sharing your travels. I have always wanted to go to Hong Kong and wonder if it should happen sooner than later if the political climate of the area keeps changing. Great post.

    Like

    • Thanks much for reading, Connie, and for commenting. Glad you enjoyed reading. I would have like to see nightlife in Hong Kong but by the end of the day we were all ready to fall into bed. Anyway, I doubt I’d go out after dark in a strange country.

      Hope you get to explore Hong Kong. 😀

      Like

  10. Fascinating trip and experience~

    Like

  11. Except for nosy Sue and I, everyone stayed on the beach. We should have been directed to the temple and all the huge and colorful statues because it was Goddess of the Sea celebration after all.
    I confess to blushing… He was a handsome young man. 😀 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  12. A busy full day. Another interesting post. Thanks.

    Like

  13. 3 cups of coffee…you must have been really awake! 🙂

    Like

  14. The breakfast sounds good, Tess. A little bit of everything.

    Like

  15. Not really all that good and certainly many less choices we’d been used to before. I felt we were in the kindergarten class and wouldn’t notice the difference. Come on, Jacqui. Stale croissants? When’s the last time you came across those? Stale anything at breakfast? Buns too? Ugh!

    Like

  16. Hmm, the Chinese people staring at you, I wonder if you can talk to an American Chinese, to find out what you did wrong?

    Like

  17. A shame your breakfast was so poor Tess. Also a shame you didn’t know of other places to eat in the hotel, things might have been different. Maybe you wouldn’t have made the mistake in sitting in a Chinese only area.
    If he was showering it’s as well he stayed in his swimwear for you. That could have been something to write home about between blushes. I love how you carry us through your trip so visually.
    xxx Massive Hugs xxx

    Like

  18. Very knowledgeable, very interesting, but most of all very beautiful and seems you had a great time…

    Like

  19. Thank you so much for sharing your memories and photos of your fabulous trip, Tess. I love every moment of my “armchair travels” with you! 🙂

    Like

  20. The Beach looks very inviting.

    Like

  21. A fascinating country – love the Tin Hau ceremony and Repulse Bay, and the hotel with the hole in it so the dragon can get through.

    Like

  22. I would have blushed if he didn’t have his bathing suit on, but would have got over it quickly and put my sun glasses on!

    Like

  23. I love all the facts you give, they are interesting and well placed. Wonderfully fun this one, the pictures always grand.

    Like

  24. I enjoy reading about your travels especially since I’ve never travelled. 🙂

    Like

    • You’re welcome to come along. I hadn’t traveled in almost 20 years when this trip fell into my lap. The urge to go anywhere wasn’t there until a friend of mine complained she needed to get away and needed a change. I asked where she wanted to go and a little voice told her I’d go with her. While we we were checking out Australia, she came across this fantastic trip at bargain basement dollars.

      Liked by 1 person

  25. Fruit and coffee, good to go! Bummer about the not so good breads. I love my breads. But come on, handsome man, showering on the beach. Sounds like you did receive some treats after all. 🙂

    Like

  26. Ssh. I did sooo. 😀 😀 😀

    Like

  27. I had thought Hong Kong was part of China now. The city must be extremely interesting, although a little scary.

    Like

  28. It’s under Chinese rule but has it’s own laws and the chief executive is appointed by Beijing. It kind of stands on its own. It was handed over by the British in 1997.

    Like

  29. Interesting place, I’m glad you include some stats. I’ve been in situations where I know I’ve done something but have no idea what….but in another country? Of course! I’m surprised it’s only happened once. 🙂 I would be messing up all over!!

    Like

  30. I confess I’m stunned I have as much information as I do. I don’t recall how I came to get this information because outnumbered by the French r group, the tour guide hardly hardly remembered to explain anything to us in English. Even as I read my notes, some of the places we visited feel they couldn’t have happened because we were on automatic pilot, our days were so full.
    Thanks so much for reading and commenting. ❤

    Like

  31. Tess, it seems you found something to keep you entertained even when the organised visit was a bit puzzling. Sorry about the breakfast although the breaking the rules is fascinating….

    Like

  32. Up till this time, the trip had been so well planned, it was a shock we weren’t told about the goings on at the far end of the beach. Sure we’d seen a bit of the dragon dance in the city but this was big and colorful and still part of the festival. As well, I was getting homesick so I believe I was getting picky. 😀 😀 😀

    Like

  33. I hope you weren’t in trouble for sitting in the wrong section, lol. And, oh, I’d rather keep colouring my hair than go gray for a seat. 😉 ❤

    Like

  34. Interesting that they have segregated seating (if that is the right term). 🙂

    Like

Some things in life are complicated. Let's keep it simple.

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s