How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE

Hong Kong: Day 23 (cont’d)

53 Comments


Sue and I headed for the bus parked almost in front of a Seven-Eleven Variety Store. We decided, as did the rest of our group, to buy water. A cashier managed to keep up with the brisk business, while another worker (or owner) kept an eye on the crowd. The store appeared to stock anything you can imagine.

Soon, almost everyone took his or her seat but someone was still missing. Hurry up and wait as the saying goes. We did wait. And wait. And wait. No explanations were given, at least not to the English Group 8. Finally, the French crowd cheered and the last couple hopped on, to loud and boisterous guffaws. The story: the husband, goofing around—whether on purpose or by accident—sent his wife into the water and of course, she was soaked through. The bus couldn’t turn back to the hotel just for her. Would you believe she bought pants and a top at the Seven-Eleven? I have no idea where she changed.

Next stop: Stanley Market. I managed to go through the paces once we were dropped off into scorching temperatures and no trees. Jewelry kiosks were plentiful, but the earrings I found weren’t to my liking. Why did dollar stores in Canada carry such fabulous ’Made in China’ earrings, but after I’d traveled all this way found nothing to compare? I did buy one pair for a souvenir, but they cost too much—five times more than in Canada—and the chandelier type already out of fashion at home.

Stanley Market

© Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8. All Rights Reserved.

Some tourists avoided shopping by visiting the Stanley Waterfront. I wish I had known about it as I expect it might have been cooler by the water.

Up an incline we trudged squeezing into the shade of anything available until the tour guide appeared to take us to the bus.

Quick Facts:

  • Japanese occupied Hong Kong in 1940s
  • A city with lots of convenient washrooms
  • Cross Harbor Tunnel opened in 1972
  • Cranes and constructions everywhere
  • 12 days a year paid holidays
  • financial district in central area
  • Education free from age 6 to 18
  • Lots of private schools for ages 6 to 15, but expensive
  • Great public facilities for young people: swimming
  • Cinemas available but people prefer big TV screens at home
  • One child per couple not applicable in Hong Kong
  • Writing is the same in Cantonese and Chinese but sound different
  • Taoism not a religion but a way of life
  • Population 7.2 million
  • Total land area 1100 square km. (426 square miles)
  • Lots of tunnels
  • Hong Kong means Fragrant Harbour
  • Pearl of the Orient
  • Visas available for visitors who come just to shop
  • No tax in Hong Kong

Only a small group signed up for a boat ride to Aberdeen, an old-fashioned fishing village, which still exists in the midst of modern high rises. Tired, thoughts of home hovered in the back of my mind and I looked forward to going home. I didn’t join in, but caught up with a group and walked around the town. At one point the ladies needed the Happy House and  took the chance to beg relief at a fancy hotel on our way. Later, we passed a grocery store where I bought a bottle of (Dynasty or maybe Great Wall) wine for 49 Hong Kong dollars (around $8.00).

~ * ~

Next on June 19th – Hong Kong, Day 23 (cont’d)

For more related posts, click on China tab at the top of the page

© 2015Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles. All Rights Reserved.

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

53 thoughts on “Hong Kong: Day 23 (cont’d)

  1. It sounds like this was one of the more enjoyable stops… or at least no death-risking hair-raising experiences. 😀
    “the shade of anything available” sounds a lot like me anytime in the summer sun — i burn easily, flitting from one spot of shade to the next. LOL. Hugs! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Love the ‘quick facts’ Great post – so interesting.

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  3. At least you were able to find a bottle of wine for $8.00. Thant could take the edge off a hot day. Enjoyed the tour.

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  4. “A city with lots of convenient washrooms”—Now that is a big plus. So often that’s not the case, and I spend a good part of my tourist time trying to hunt one down!

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  5. Sounds like this was a more pleasurable time, wine and all. 🙂

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  6. I hate hot weather. Didn’t the tourguide mention the waterfront? That’s a shame. Convenience stores really are just that. And in Japan, there will be about 50 kinds of instant noodles and several microwaves to nuke them. When I lived in Philadelphia, I loved going in Chinatown and nosing about those convenience shops that were packed with everything! Very interesting post as usual Tess.

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  7. I chuckled at the comment about gorgeous earrings ‘made in China’. Another good day of travel with you, Tess.

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  8. I’m glad RJ is so prolific with his camera. There are some nice shots there. This is the first time I’ve ever heard that earrings go out of fashion. I bet the wine was a boost later on.
    xxx Massive Hugs xxx

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    • My mouth hung open so much of the time, I forgot to go ‘click’. Anyway, I have never been one to remember to take a picture at the best of times and I tried during this once-in-a-lifetime-vacation. Trouble (also) is, the iPad was new and I missed lots of pictures because of ‘touch’ on the pad and remembering to take a picture in the first place. Next time I’ll check immediately if the picture I wanted t.o.o.k.
      Yes, I am ever so grateful for RJ for sharing his pictures. My posts have greatly benefited from them.
      Mega hugs, David. Thank you for reading and commenting. I love ‘talking’ and ‘discussing’, ❤

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  9. Thank you for all the cultural and historical updates about the places you visited. It’s funny to think of you going to China and wishing you could find stuff made in China!

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    • Is that crazy? I don’t buy expensive jewelry since I lost a 14-karat gold earring way back. The fabulous earring I’ve found in dollar stores are creative and fit my like. I imagined I’d be knee deep in more of the same we find at home when I west met east. Sigh. Nope. 😦

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  10. Cool about the written script vs the spoken language!

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  11. I would have joined the ‘avoid the shopping’ group!
    I remember when I was a boy the label ‘made in Hong Kong’ meant that it was cheap and cheerful!

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  12. I’ll never complain again about the 29 days holiday I get each year!

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  13. This didn’t seem as stressful a day as some of the others. Though for some reason I keep getting surprised about the heat. I don’t know why…. Enjoyed the pictures.

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  14. I continue to be amazed by the amount of sight-seeing your tour group put into your trip. Do you think the tour company received special compensation for bringing you to each specific place such as the 7/11?

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  15. I love the shopping in Hong Kong, but I suspect because I had local friends I saw a different side of the city and thus had a different shopping experience. The pictures are wonderful, lucky you had a member of the group willing to share! As always you do a fabulous job both with your tour and the quick facts. I think you missed your calling Tess, truly I do.

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  16. that’s funny about the earrings. It’s like they ship off all the good stuff overseas.

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  17. Great photos and lovely mementos of an incredible trip 🙂

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  18. You should consider submitting some of your stuff to a travel mag. Bet they’d gobble it up. Loved your post. Jean’s Writing

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  19. Lovely pics, Tess!

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  20. Glad to see you got your laptop issues fixed Tess. Two wows, clothing in 7/11 and cheap earrings that are more expensive than Canada? Now that’s an eye opener. 🙂

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  21. Sounds like Hong Kong had a lot to offer. Too bad it was at the end of the trip as you were probably ready to get back home. My English father-in-law was stationed in Hong Kong after the war and he liked it there.

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  22. Outside markets are fun but only if you’re not battling the possibility of heat stroke. I’m sure you would have liked the waterfront instead. According to my sister-in-law (Chinese growing up in Indonesia), the merchandise sent to Europe and North America are superior because the factories that cater to the regions that are in Asia are owned by people from those regions. The owners are Attila the Huns, expecting more than they should from the employees. I have no idea about if this is true or not though.

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  23. My cousin worked in HK for a number of years and loved it. As Darlene said above, it was probably a pity HK was at the end of the trip – you had already packed so much in to the whole adventure and were getting a bit ‘over it’. I would love to visit HK and will do one day.

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  24. They have orange road cones the same as ours! I’ll tell you, we all missed a trick not investing in those when they were first invented!

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  25. 😀 😀 😀 You have a sharp eye, Vanessa. Nice to see you. All is well? Missed you. ❤

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  26. It sounds quite tiring (I guess you’re right and coming at the end of the trip you’re already thinking about going back to the comfort of home). It sounds as if you got a great deal… Must give us some tips, although I suspect it’s one of those opportunities that come once in a lifetime and in the right moment. And thanks again for my post! (I suspect they send the earrings abroad…)

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    • Yes, I itched for home for a day or two already. Too much of a good thing and all that…
      I’ve priced all trips to China I come across and this one was one of a kind and a real steal. I hope to fall on another great bargain for another trip.

      Yes, it seems all the earring I like are exported. That is not to say they don’t have the expensive pearl earring but not only are they too expensive (I’d hate to lose one) but too small for my liking.

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  27. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    Managed to catch up with my virtual trip to Hong Kong.. a detailed and fascinating trip through China that has certainly opened my eyes to this country that is still such as enigma. Do go behind the scenes with Tess Karlinski.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Brings back many memories of HK in the early seventies. I can tell you that it was the BEST place for an eighteen year old to be living at that time.

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  29. Reblogged this on Lance Greenfield and commented:
    Brings back many memories of HK in the early seventies. I can tell you that it was the BEST place for an eighteen year old to be living at that time.

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  30. Thanks for the virtual tour Tess. It’s great to have your company. 🙂

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  31. What a trip and what a constant pace. You have a wonderful job of recording it which I’m sure makes memories clearer.

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    • Thank you, Rebecca. Nice to see you. Yes, I took more notes than I can recall. We were so on-the-go, I believe I was on auto pilot so going through my notes and posting helps me enjoy the trip as well as or better than the first thing around. Something I hardly remember at all until I read my notebook a couple times. If they weren’t in my handwriting, I’d be tempted to say someone is playing tricks on me. 😀 😀 ❤

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  32. Beautiful pictures! I would not be too please about being accidentally pushed into the water! 🙂

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