How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE

Where are the Moose?

45 Comments


The airport limo arrived on the button and the ride to Toronto proved uneventful with one other passenger pickup. Debbie Kaye won’t believe this—I couldn’t either—the airport was a breeze this time. We had arrived at the right time with e-Tickets and boarding passes in hand. A bored attendant printed our luggage tags, we checked our luggage and zipped through Security in a snap. Only a handful of passengers waited ahead of us. A traveler’s dream or had we stumbled into the Twilight Zone?

Mary and I weren’t buzzed the way we’d expected. Boarding occurred fifteen minutes late because a recent arrival was readied for our flight to Deer Lake.

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We took to the tour guide right away. He’s one of those people you warm up to as if you’d know him all your life. As we found out, the charm about Newfoundlanders is you talk to one for five minutes and you’re friends for life. Maybe the real reason is you have to stick close and listen hard because the Irish /British lilt and Newfoundland speech patterns demand you hang on to most every word. We understood Francis better than other people whose paths we crossed.

Our bus astonished me: a honking one-year-old beauty with elevated seating for the passengers and a tall and wide wraparound windshield which afforded a panoramic view. Puddles on the asphalt showed signs of earlier rain, but had stopped earlier. The temperature was seasonal and comfortable. I’m not sure about my sister Mary, but my brain wasn’t in gear.

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Deer Lake quick facts:

  • Pockets of water all over the island resulted from glaciers
  • Humber River runs out of Deer Lake: beautiful salmon river
  • Salmon as heavy as 30 pounds (but you don’t keep those)
  • Population of Deer Lake around 5,000
  • 1920 construction of Deer Lake Power Company hydro plant
  • 1922 International Pulp and Paper Company work camp
  • 1925 camp formal Town of Deer Lake
  • 1955 airport built
  • Airport serviced close to 340,000 passengers in 2014

Our tour consisted of 31 tourists. Sixteen came from Ontario; twelve from British Columbia and across the Prairies; a couple from California; a young woman from Germany, plus our guide and the bus driver. We were booked to over-night in Corner Brook but first excursion had begun.

Newfoundland Facts:

  • The Appalachians extend from Newfoundland and Labrador to Central Alabama
  • Rival the Himalayans
  • Eroded over time due to wind and glaciers
  • Oldest rock on earth found in Labrador

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Moose Facts:

  • 1904 moose brought here from New Brunswick
  • Because of tall, spindly legs, can peel top off a small car on impact
  • Many collisions in Newfoundland because of moose sightings
  • 90% of drivers swerve to avoid moose (heavy skid marks on highways)
  • Weight of moose 1200 pounds and more
  • Hunters from North and South Carolina, Quebec, Pennsylvania come to hunt moose
  • Current moose population over 100,000
  • Considered a menace. Eat 20 kilogram (50#) of young trees a day
  • Will eat whole forests: balsam, fir
  • Hunting season extended
  • Controlled areas hunting Gros Morne National Park
  • Fenced areas at Gros Morne to protect trees (whole areas bare of trees)

I suppose the moose had no idea we were there as we’d just arrived.

***

Hockey and politics are the two most enjoyed pastimes in Newfoundland.

* * *

Next on October 9th:  Adventures in Corner Brook

© 2015 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles. All Rights Reserved.

For related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page.  

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

45 thoughts on “Where are the Moose?

  1. did anybody mention “stomping tom conner”? https://youtu.be/cFBiN9y_bRM

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  2. Sounds like a fun trip! I’ve never been there, but would love to!

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  3. So far, so great, Tess! They sound a bit fed up with their over abundance of moose!

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  4. Eeerrr… the moose do sound scary. Long ago I had a coworker who previously lived in Maine. She often talked about how mean the moose were. I hope you didn’t accidentally get up close and personal with any! 😀
    The people however, sound lovely. Mega hugs!

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  5. Sounds like a good group and a comfortable bus. They should have prepared the moose! Why is the plural of moose moose, if the plural of goose is geese?

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    • Indeed a terrific question I again have no answer to. Isn’t English a confusing language. I cannot image a ESL student taking us on, although I have known many as I hosted them in my country fro 10 years. I tried to help. Between school and me, I’m not sure who might have been helpful. ❤ The thought of learning another language–not even English–gives me the sweats. 👿

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  6. Wonderful. I’m so glad you are taking me along. I was wondering why 30 pound salmon aren’t kept?

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  7. I wouldn’t want to come face to face with 1200 lb. of moose ! Looks like you had a great adventure.

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  8. I’ve heard that about Newfoundlanders–that they’re so friendly they’ll melt even the awkwardest introvert’s heart. Which means I definitely must go there!

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  9. Now I want to go, but not to tangle with a moose.

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  10. We have not been to Nfld Tess and look forward to your tour. I would prefer no moose running me over but other than that I am game for most anything. 🙂

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  11. Biggest thing we have to watch out for in the roads are red deer and it is not a good idea to collide with one of them either!

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  12. Oh I’m going to enjoy this Tess, i don’t know anything about Newfoundland apart from the nice dog breed!

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  13. Newfoundland is on my bucket list.

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  14. I´m so glad you are reporting on your recent trip to Newfoundland! Look forward to more.

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  15. It sounds like a great trip, Tess! I had no idea that moose ate trees, or that they’re so destructive. The only moose I know anything about is Bullwinkle, and he’s so nice. 🙂
    I chuckled at this: “Revile the Himalayans.” I’m picturing the mountain chains shouting insults at at each other. Haha.

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  16. Its sounds as though you had a wonderful trip with plenty to see, I didn’t know that moose were soo greedy! 🙂

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  17. I knew moose were a problem for drivers in NFLD but I didn’t know they had been artificially introduced to the island. Isn’t that normally the case though? … introduce a plant or animal to a region they aren’t indigenous to and then they pose a problem to the environment.

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  18. Another travel adventure I see. The moose does as much damage as our Kangaroos it seems. I’m with Lucid, I only know the breed Newfoundlands.

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  19. I want a road trip! I’d always thought the oldest rock on earth was in Australia. How old is the one in Labrador? We have one in Ontario, CA that’s 2B years old!

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  20. I love road trips. It’s the wanderlust in me, I’m sure. Going by private vehicle is my preference, but going by chartered bus is something I wouldn’t pass up. I’ve been on the regular buses — yuck for the most part. The moose were what I thought I’d see living in rural country of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, but even after living there six years, I didn’t see one. 😦

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  21. I was in Newfoundland once on business and loved the people and the scenery. Did not see any moose though, which is probably a good thing.

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    • I agree with you about the people: warm, wonderful, true-blue. I can’t get Newfoundland out of my mind. Our guide is a local and gave everything to make our trip enjoyable. The scenery is amazing: all that water and rugged coastline. Made me feel as small as an ant. 🙂
      Nice to see you. Thanks for the visit, Chris. Hope all is well with you. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Great start to the trip Tess. I’m buckled in and ready. I’ll keep my eyes peeled for the Moose. I would prefer to avoid them myself.

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  23. Ok, huge LOL Tess! Perhaps you didn’t pack too many bags? Maybe because you don’t have red hair? Give it up – what’s your secret? LOL. Great tour here of our great (cold) Canadian country. Don’t you love how it was summer a few days ago and feels like it’s about to snow today? ❤

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  24. Newfoundland is the only Canadian province I have not visited (though I am still missing two of the three territories). I didn’t realize I would be in such moose danger while there!

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  25. My Dad used to call them mooses which made me giggle…there were a lot of mooses up in Northern Ontario where I grew up (and they’re tasty too, if you marinate them well).
    Stompin’ Tom wasn’t from Sudbury, but he sure knew how to have fun on A Sudbury Saturday Night!
    Hockey and politics and a few other, um, things sound awesome.
    Your trip sounds amazing, Tess and the East Coast of Canadian is stunning. We’re a gorgeous country with apparently a lot of mooses. 😉
    Can’t wait for the next installment…entertaining and informative. 🙂

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  26. Hi Tess, you get around, and are traveling in style! I love all the photos and fun facts. Moose are incredible creatures–so odd in appearance, like a throwback to the ice age. Looking forward to the next episode.

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  27. Moose attack! I think your bus might be to big for their aggression. I so enjoy your travelogue! More please

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  28. Oh, how I love the mooses (meese?). So big and dumb.

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  29. And we’re off; I had a Scottish relative who used to say moose rather than mouse – as in ‘there’s a moose in the hoose’ which meant for many years I thought of the moose as a small rodent. Shows how wrong you can be.

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  30. My father’s family was from Newfoundland……

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  31. Oh, Newfoundland!
    I love how as soon as you get into New Brunswick you start seeing traffic signs warning you about moose.
    Hitting a moose is no laughing matter, but these signs always give me a giggle – I think they’re exaggerating just a little!

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    • Love the sign. 🙂 Hitting a moose is real. In Northern Ontario, years ago my father came across an accident between a Volkswagen and a moose. He couldn’t describe the mayhem. Of course the car and driver were no more; the moose had to be shot. Used to hear about accidents all the time.
      Thanks so much for contribution to the conversation. 🙂

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