How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE

L’Anse Amour, NFL.

73 Comments


L’Anse Amour  (near the Quebec border) is the smallest, most northerly community, and the National Historic Site of Canada.

The HMS_Raleigh ran aground here in 1922, a huge embarrassment to the British. The Davis family (a community of seven) took in the 700 men who survived (11 died) though they had no means of housing and feeding such a large number. The sailors salvaged all they could from the ship even the piano. Men slept on the shore (anywhere and everywhere) and some later stayed for a couple months after the British rescue ship arrived. The British Admiralty granted land to the Davis Family, in perpetuity as well as the cove itself, for their selfless deed.

Flash forward to 2012 and the 90-year-old-wreckage.

Only ten Davises live in L’anse Amour now. This is the Davis Family Graveyard.

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Built in 1858, the Point Amour lighthouse is the tallest lighthouse in Atlantic Canada and the second highest in the country. If you’re interested in others or their histories, click here.

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The lighthouse has a gift shop on the first floor (of course). The furniture on this floor had been removed to make room for the displays / models  and to accommodate busloads of tourists passing through.

The furnishings of the day as well as sample clothing were displayed on the second floor. This main building had no bathroom facilities though the demand was high. Anyone wanting to use them had to walk a good distance in a blustery wind to another building away from the main attraction.

Below, a model of the lighthouse:

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The stairway to the top  wasn’t what I’d expected. A guide led small groups at a time, but how had they fit? Mary and I were last—just us three. The stairs weren’t what I had expected either. They were steep, did not snake, but were vertical and had six landings. The last two levels were ladders, not stairs as the space had gradually became smaller and narrower as we worked our way to the top. Why? I had not thought to ask, but I wonder if it had to do with the lighthouse platform (with the saving light) and the space for it. Cannot find the answer.

Shedding light on a landing in this dark tower along the way up.

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The last couple sets of ladder rungs were so tight (and vertical), no way could I turn around if I had to. Legs quaking, we huffed and puffed our way to the top: 132 steps and 109 feet up. What a view! (I had to scrap a number of pictures, which reflected the photographer in the glass).

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More images of L’Anse Amour

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Next on February 19th: About Whales and Fishing and Fish Oil, Oh My! (day 4 continued)

© 2015 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page.

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

73 thoughts on “L’Anse Amour, NFL.

  1. Sounds like an interesting place to visit. Quite the history. Bet you worked up an appetite climbing those steps!

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  2. wow 132 steps! My legs would be wobbly lol

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  3. Okay… that’s a lot of stairs. Lighthouses have such a mystique. Thanks for bringing us along to this one Tess. Mega hugs!

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  4. Tess, this is one of the most interesting parts of your travels. I loved the story of the baby and was able to read the monument in French with only a few translation hiccups – bone whistle and walrus tusk especially. What a grand burial for an infant, with accoutrements for the next world. I wonder if he was a prince? I can imagine his family’s devastation at his death. The story of the ship wreck reminds me of the film “The Russians are Coming, the Russians are Coming” with Alan Arkin. And the lighthouse – can you imagine having to climb up and down that tower several times a day to keep the light lit? I might be tempted to let the ship captains figure it out on their own once in a while – LOL. I hope you have another vacation planned – your travelogue is fascinating.

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    • Sharon, your comments warm my heart. Pleased you want to come along. I love reliving my trip because I get to find things I’d almost missed or scribbled about but it didn’t sink in. I can’t put my finger on exactly why this particular trip excites me still.
      I sit on my butt all day long at home, when I get out I get b.r.a.v.e. Eke. Heights scare me. I cannot believe I climbed to the top. Of course, no one made an announcement about the number of steps beforehand. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Gorgeous natural pictures, and a great story. Some people are amazing.

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  6. Thanks for writing this.

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  7. I can imagine how tough it was to get to the top. The pictures are fabulous.

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  8. I LOVE lighthouses, the history associated with them and imagining the lightkeeper’s (and family’s) life. I know what you mean about the tops of those staircases–I just try to look straight ahead while going down or I really get nervous :0

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  9. Wonderful photos, Tess! Quite a trek to the top though! Not sure it was that safe! Look forward to the next travel post! Happy Valentine’s Day, my friend!
    💛 Elizabeth

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  10. I dont know if I would make it but I would certainly try climbing just for the view.. 😉

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  11. It all seems so lonely and desolate. But I love it, and if I were 40 years younger I’d want to live there!

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  12. You’re such a trooper Tess! 132 steps, you go girl! Excellent share as always. 🙂

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  13. Fascinating and lovely pictures.

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  14. Sounds quite a climb. If you go to Rome ever try the visit to the top of St Peter’s Basilica, it is equally as arduous!

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  15. My, you do get around, Tess. This is fascinating.Jx

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  16. What an interesting place. I love light houses and have only been to the top of a couple of them. Those stairs sound a bit scary. I would manage going up OK but always have trouble going down for some reason.

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    • Ha ha I thought coming down would be easier but NO room to look where you’re going. It was like climbing into an abyss, but now I’m glad I did it. Don’t know what got into me. Heights make me ill and well–my knees aren’t as elastic as they once were. ❤ ❤

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  17. The lighthouses are fascinating, my son’s in Nova Scotia at the moment, and a regular lighthouse visitor!

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  18. I would have enjoyed this Tess, though I am a bit leery of heights I still would have done it. Wobbly legs too. It sure looks worth it. I love the story about the Davis’.

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  19. Great job on the hike up those ‘stairs’! Good for you to make the trek up!

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  20. That was well worth the climb wasn’t it? Well done you, it would kill my knees!

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  21. Your photos bring out the purity of NFL. 🙂

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    • I confess I’m still attached to it. All that water and clean air and so much less hustle and bustle. Loved it. The people are so jolly and friendly. They work hard and like to laugh to loosen up.
      Thanks for reading, Carol. Wonderful to have you along. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Anyone sneak back and try on those clothes? Cool trip.

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  23. Very interesting, but gosh those stairs! My Neil volunteers at a local windmill/museum, and it hadn’t occurred to me before how similar windmills and lighthouses are inside.

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  24. This is another fantastic trip! I have never been in a lighthouse but I have been in a windmill in Holland and was very similar by the sounds of it!!

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  25. Great photos, Tess. I especially love the lighthouse. I always wished I could live in one with the fabulous views they have. The stairs would do me in now though 😀 😀

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  26. I love travelling, though lately it is little difficult for me, this kind of trips are interesting, not only as you can meet people from other part in our world but visiting interesting places like this which belong to the History of the country. For a while I haven´t answer anything in your blog… hace you changed the sistem?

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  27. Don’t know if you can read it, my name monts ago was Rosa Ave Fénix.

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  28. I am so impressed you climbed to the top! What a view. Fascinating history. Your travels thrill me. I think the weather up there would deter me, does it get better?

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    • I’m impressed I climbed all the way. I don’t like heights, but when would I get another opportunity?
      I’m pleased you’re enjoying my travels, Val. Nice to have you along.
      The weather was good until the night of the morning we arrived. The storm on the Atlantic side started all that rain and drizzle. No, it didn’t change for the duration, but on the morning the tour guide drove us to the airport he said the forecast was for sun, sun, sun and warm temperatures. Bah. ❤

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  29. I love lighthouses. We visited several in N Z which all see,med to be tourist destinations. And yes they all taper don’t they.

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  30. I also love lighthouses and thanks for the historical snippet. Fascinating place, even with the inconvenience and scary stairs… Looking forward to more!

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    • Thanks so much, Olga. I’ve always been fascinated by lighthouses but never in my wildest dreams thought I’d ever find myself inside one. Exciting. I can’t imagine being a lighthouse keeper. Up and down. Up and down. ❤

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