How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE

Discovery Center and Lunch

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The boat adventure across Bonne Bay to Woody Point over, Shaun drove us to the restaurant for lunch.

As close to the internet as you’re going to get (Note #2)

Lunch:

Because of the dampness outside, I’d hoped for a hot coffee upon entering the restaurant. No luck. A full water jug center-pieced each table. The meal arrived almost immediately.

Three kinds of fish: Capelin, Turbot and Cod. Two scoops mashed potatoes dusted with fresh parsley, carrot knuckles, and a branch of broccoli. The carrots were perfect, just soft enough, and the broccoli crisp and bright green.

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The Capelin was tricky. It’s a small fish about six inches long and deep-fried. The bones, tail, and side fin were edible as was the backbone inside. The chef split the fish in half for a nice presentation, but I didn’t enjoy the (too hard- over-fried?) texture though the taste was fine.

Dessert: Nanaimo bars (one for everyone as well as cloudberry tarts (yellow berries). Shortly after, cream cheese pie with partridge berry sauce (red) arrived. Only two tarts and one bar remained at our table for four. I didn’t partake. Coffee and tea were served in lovely china teacups and saucers. Only one cup of either per customer. Oh.

Our tour group filled the small restaurant. One server delivered and picked up after all 34 meals. Afterwards she had to rush off to another job.

This is some of the art on the walls inside the restaurant:

After lunch, we walked—more like struggled—on the boardwalk along the water. The wind blew strong and fierce, too wicked for picture taking.

I was relieved to get on the bus after the wind’s blowing us about. Off to see the World Heritage Site, Gros Morne Park and tablelands.

No wind here. I managed to stash three small rocks into my pocket for souvenirs. We were told not to take any, but I’m not sure if that was a joke. Why not? Was there worry they’d run out?

The drizzle continued, though the sun made attempts to nip in and out of the clouds. Next on our agenda was the new Discovery Centre where we finally saw replicas of a moose and caribou. This was a gorgeous building but a sign next to the bathroom door warned the water wasn’t safe for drinking until it was boiled for a full two minutes. Shoot. I hadn’t thought to bring a kettle.

  • The moose is large like a horse
  • Is part of the deer family
  • Has paddle-shaped antlers
  • Females don’t grow antlers
  • Has long legs

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  • Caribou are much smaller than moose
  • Part of the deer family
  • Antlers grow tall with many branches
  • Female grows and sheds antlers
  • Also called reindeer
  • Have wide hooves
  • Like the cold and high altitudes

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We watched a film on climate change, took pictures of models, and lost Francis. We wandered about killing time until he showed up. A panicked woman from our group approached Mary and me. Her iPad said it was out of storage space and she couldn’t get in. Mary happened to know what to do because she’d the same problem the day before. She managed to get into the video files for the woman to delete some of them to free up space. The look of wonder she gave Mary was priceless.

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Jake Crocker Heritage House

* * *

Next on March 25th – Jiggs Dinner and Anchors Aweigh

© 2015 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles. All Rights Reserved.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

66 thoughts on “Discovery Center and Lunch

  1. Such a beautiful place. I would love to live here.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. That’s my kind of lunch and it looks delicious. The place looks so peaceful and lush, so nice to see.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Paulette. The lunch was way too much for that time of day but hey, I dug in well. I loved that there were no factories of stinky industry. The air clear, cool and–sigh–windy or drizzly, but we lived to tell the tale. 😀

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  3. That looks like a great place. Loved this post. Your meal made me feel hungry and I adored the moose figures.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Nfld has really been on our minds as a destination Tess. It seems from your posts that a good rain /wind jacket and warm clothes should be a necessity. I loved the art as well as the moos sculptures. Not so long ago we got to see a Mama and baby moose in the mountains.

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    • The tourist season had closed the previous week. The weather had been wonderful, as well as plentiful whales and lobster. We were a waiting list the tour company decided to keep happy I suppose. Moose season started as we were leaving. Our guide was getting revved up to go hunting. Funny, we never saw even one.
      It would have been wonderful to see a Mama and baby moose. I’ve never seen a baby. Lucky you.

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  5. Interesting tidbits, Tess. Darn, but they were stingy with the coffee, huh? Or was it that the management was taking pity on the one and only server… Always fascinating to take a trip with you. Mega hugs

    Liked by 1 person

    • Wonderful to see you, Teagan. I’m not sure about the one-coffee bit. Seems it was the norm everywhere, except the one restaurant we were allowed to grab a paper cup and top up because we hadn’t enough time to finish our ‘mug up.’
      I didn’t notice anyone else bothering the waitress for a second cup either.

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  6. Spectacular photography! Heading out that way next year! 💛💛💛

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank YOU, Clanmother. Glad you’re heading that way. I enjoyed myself as I’m sure you will as well. The people are warm and funny, always looking for a good laugh. Our tour had been tacked on when the season was already closed due to people on the waiting list. Everything might have been brighter had we gone earlier in September, or before.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Enjoyed this look at the scene. What was up with the coffee and tea? My goodness a cup just wouldn’t cut it. Thanks for taking me along.

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  8. Love the restaurant art – especially the steep mountain sides.

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  9. You do get to some fantastic places Tess. The pictures are glorious.
    xxx Sending Gigantic Hugs xxx

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    • Thank you, David. I don’t know much about this style of painting, but am curious and will have to look into it. Though the colors are muted, they are bright and cheery. Nice to have you along. Thanks for the visit. 😀

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  10. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    I do enjoy my armchair travels with Teresa Karlinski​ who has guided me through China in the last couple of years and is now introducing me to Newfoundland.. Her posts are entertaining, informative and detailed.. I felt quite the shiver from the wind that swept across Woody Point this morning!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Enjoyed this very much, Tess. Wonderful photos and I love the art on the walls of the restaurant 🙂 Brrr…those winds, we’ve had a taste of them over this winter too, whipping up the ocean and making walking difficult.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Thank you for the tales and the photographs Tess x

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  13. In 1976 I walked to the top of Mount Vesuvius and put some pieces of solidified lava in my pocket. I still have them but have often wondered if I should have taken them.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I love rocks and wind. 🙂 I could go there. 🙂

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  15. Even though Newfoundland is near the ocean so therefore snow isn’t as much of a problem, I’m still surprised at how flat the roof is on that house. There are major storms along any coast, and I would think a steep roof would be more suitable.

    Your disappointment in not have coffee available is understanding. Coffee, tea, cocoa, something to warm the insides seeing that the weather was getting nasty would have been terrific.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Usually they have tons and tons of snow. This year, not so much but then we didn’t get much either. It’s been a weird winter. When I was a kid, we lived by a lake and we were blasted by snow every winter. I don’t know how the snowplow mounded the snow as high as it did. 🙂
      The village I lived in (the one by the lake) also had buildings with flat roofs. You had to get up there and knock it off after big storms. I don’t understand why they weren’t peeked. The houses were, but not the business area.

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  16. That seems like so much food! I think it’s because I’m so sedentary anymore, with all the writing. You’re up and walking around and braving the elements. I bet that burns lots of calories.

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    • I know. That’s not my idea of lunch–more like supper. We DID sit a lot covering lots of miles by bus and there were those days we couldn’t really walk around a sight because of the weather. Still, we did our share of walking and my clothes didn’t feel / get tight. 🙂

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  17. It looks interesting but cold! The fish must have been very fresh.

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    • The fish was great. Cod is king there and we certainly had a lot of it. It was nothing like what we buy frozen in our grocery stores. No fishy smell at ALL. At home I prefer sole to cod but in Newfoundland, I probably wouldn’t know the difference because the cod was that light. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  18. Tess, Newfoundland is such a beautiful place even in the drizzle. Being a tea drinker, not so nice, lunch with one cup of tea! Fun traveling with you! Look forward to the next trip! Happy Weekend! 💛 Elizabeth

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    • Thanks so much for coming along, Elizabeth. Great to have you. Never can do much about the weather, but I can’t complain. The sole waitress had her hands full. I didn’t notice anyone else asking her for second cups of tea or coffee. On the other hand, maybe Newfoundlanders subscribe to that one cup of coffee to which we’re told we should limit ourselves. 😀

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  19. Looks like a yummy lunch, and like the art work too, strange about not allowing you to take the stones!

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    • Yes, the lunch was filling. Under regular circumstances a dish like this would be my supper, not lunch. Not that I eat sweets, but I was too full for anything afterwards, certainly not dessert. 😀
      About the stones, that might be a joke. o_O

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  20. I so enjoyed this read Tess. Newfoundland is a part of Canada I have to explore but hope to do so in the next year or so.

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    • I lucked out going to Newfoundland with my sister because of our exchange rates to U.S.D. We decided to stay in Canada. Except for the weather–a storm blew in across the Atlantic the night of the day we arrived–the trip was interesting and the people warm and funny. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Wonderful photos. I am enjoying your trip. 🙂

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  22. Those desserts sound lush, you don’t eat sweet stuff at all? Shame about the small coffee rations, you must have been desperate 🙂

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    • I was desperate about the coffee–or anything hot by that point. I noticed no-one else asked for seconds. The sole waitress was run off her feet.
      No, I don’t care about desserts. I don’t know when or how that happened–years ago. At least I might be saving a few calories a day. 😀

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  23. On the issue of Coffee….what is up with that? I would have been on my knees in tears begging for more. I am certain they would have thought me quite spoiled and terrible.

    I loved your pictures, your descriptions, the art on the walls too. I think taking a couple or three rocks will not break them. I am always taking some reminder from the places I visit. As always, your tours of the places you visit is spot on and such a joy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The restaurant was airy, full of light, small and had only us as patrons. Can’t have much business. They must live for the tour buses. Lots of places were already closed for the season. Our trip was an add-on because of interest in Newfoundland.
      One girl to do the serving, cleaning up and coffee service was a bit much. I didn’t notice anyone asking for seconds–and then she had to rush off to another job. o_O
      Always wonderful to see you, Val. Thanks for the visit. ❤

      Like

  24. Lunch looked yummy. And that wind doesn’t seem to let up, lol. I have to admit I didn’t know that the caribou is smaller than moose. Thanks for the lessons and great photos. 🙂 xo ❤

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  25. Thanks for sharing, Tess. I love the art in the restaurant although the staff sound really overworked. Oh technology… Looking forward to more!

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    • Business can’t be all that good if we were the only customers (1 busload and not even a full one).
      I really like the folksy and colorful art as well. The restaurant was airy and pretty–no other way to describe it.
      Great to see you. ❤ ❤ 😀

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  26. It looks such an interesting place, reminds me of Ireland. I think there’s a large community of Irish descendants in Newfoundland, it must have reminded their ancestors of home. My friend’s daughter and her husband lived there for a year and she said some of the people in the town she was in spoke with a Waterford accent, although they had never been to Ireland.

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    • Hi, nice to see you, Jean. I’m not sure what the Waterford accent is, but I can tell you some towns are solid Irish from what our tour guide said. He’s 5th generation (I believe in Newfoundland) and he definitely sounded Irish. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  27. Great post and glorious pics as always, Tess!

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  28. It does seem cold and bleak outside but any view of the ocean is wonderful. Did you get to see any live moose or reindeer, or just the sculptures?
    Don’t forget to take out the rocks before you launder!

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  29. Love the art! And the fish made me drool. Loved this whole post, thank you Tess, for taking us on your journey. I always wanted to live there, now even more so. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Pingback: Smorgasbord Easter Egg Hunt – Bloggers who are ‘Jolly good eggs’ | Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life

  31. A beautiful place and your dinner looded delicious. I enjoyed taking this journey with you.

    Liked by 1 person

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