How the Cookie Crumbles

Life in the fast and slow lanes after SIXTY-FIVE

Do Salmon Need Help?

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Three of our group left us yesterday. After breakfast, we bused to Deer Lake to drop three more couples at the airport. They hadn’t known about the 12-day package and would have liked to stay on. We are down to 22, which gives us lots of choices where to sit on the huge bus.

Another overcast day, but the sun was stubborn and peeked out sporadically around stubborn, sullen clouds. By 8:38 a.m., Francis had popped in a DVD about the last of the Red Indians— the Beothuk —who painted their skin with ochre (their spiritual connection).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ft6pT-xK5FA  (The Last of the Red Indians and Stealing Mary)

After the movie, I dozed as did the rest of my fellow travelers. Though it was early morning, I decided on an early night, maybe straight after supper.

The luncheon offer consisted of cod stuffed with crab. Though not bad, I couldn’t find the crab. Two scoops of mashed potatoes and lots of kernel corn decorated the plate. The coffee was bitter. We did not stay for dessert as we were to enjoy a planned mug up later.

Next stop: the logging town, Grand Falls-Windsor and the Exploits River, the longest river in Newfoundland. We learned how salmon make their way up on the fish ways and how their stocks have increased due to the diligent work done there. Can you believe it takes three years for a salmon to grow to adulthood?

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Lookout to to Salmon Interpretation Center:

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Examples of salmon ladders to the river:

  • The project started three years ago with only 1,000 fish
  • Up to 30,000 now
  • The fish go back to the river and the first year out to Greenland and the sea
  • They then swim upstream once every two years as it is ideal for them and saps their energy
  • Fishing is allowed June, July, and August
  • Restriction of two fish per person each month and less than 63 cm (two feet) in length
  • On bright days, flies need lots of silver
  • Dark color on a dark day
  • The longer the fly, the more chance you catch attention of a salmon
  • They are not hungry, merely attracted to shiny things floating by

We visited a local craft shop in Lewisporte where we were treated to a mug up. A fellow had come in to entertain us on his electric piano. The music was so good, Francis asked Mary for a waltz and made her day.

We had leftover pizza for supper and didn’t bother leaving the room. Television didn’t hold my interest, and my eyes were too heavy to read.

Quick Facts:

  • Current population in Newfoundland approximately 500,000
  • No snakes, deer or chipmunks
  • No ragweed
  • 44 species of orchids
  • 16th largest island in the world
  • Squirrels introduced to Newfoundland in 1963
  • 3 large oil fields on the grand banks
  • Hibernia Oil Field most profitable in Canada

* * *

Next on May 13th – Beothuks

© 2015 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles. All Rights Reserved.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page

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If you are reading this, thank you for coming back after my sudden disappearance. Without you, I wouldn’t have this blog nor enjoy our pleasant exchanges. A special thanks to those who ‘checked’ up on me. You have been my strength during a difficult time. Bless you all.

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

80 thoughts on “Do Salmon Need Help?

  1. Many salmon(and all kinds of fish) off our Pacific coast are contaminated as that nuke plant in Fukishima , Japan is still spewing radiation into the ocean.

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  2. No snakes? Where do I sign up? 🙂

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  3. No Deer, chipmunks, or snakes. I wonder why they allowed squirrels in?

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  4. You are going to be the smartest person around about your homeland. I am amazed what you are seeing. You’re making me want to put my pen aside and start traveling.

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    • Ha ha ha. You are so generous, Jacqui. Without notes, I’m a sham. o_O Ultra-forgetful.
      True, I so enjoyed everything I learned, but forgot till I revisited my notes to blog and hopefully share with you all. I had no idea I would enjoy this trip again through blogging, Lucky me. ❤ ❤ ❤

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  5. Welcome back, Tess! You were missed.
    No ragweed? That’s even better than no snakes. Terrific place.
    I hope all is well. Sending you sunshine super hugs. (I’ll have the sunshine shipped from the desert. We haven’t had any in a couple of weeks…) 🙂

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    • Teagan, you ARE the sunshine in my day. Thank YOU for the welcome back.
      I don’t have a problem with ragweed personally, but know many who do. What a surprise NFL doesn’t have ragweed. What? Amazing.
      Hanging in. Praying for no roadblocks for a long, long time. Thank you, Teagan. ❤ ❤ ❤

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  6. I agree with Teagan, no ragweed sounds heavenly!
    Welcome back, dear Tess, I hope things are going well.
    Enjoyed the post and the lack of snakes. 😉
    Hope this weekend treats you well. 🙂

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    • You could have blown me over with a whisper. Where in Canada doesn’t ragweed exist. Small thinking and taking things for granted. Goes to show you cannot take anything for granted. Ever. Still, I WAS blown away about the ragweed and the snakes. Maybe, we can sent our surplus to them? o_O Just sharing. The Canadian way, right?

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    • I know for lots of people I know ragweed is MORE than a problem. Thank goodness I have no experience in that concern–at least not yet. You never know, right?
      Glad to be back and to see all your sweet, friendly faces. I missed you all. ❤ ❤ ❤

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  7. We have a fish ladder here in the town where I live Tess. It is quite the operation! Lovely to see your post today!

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  8. Interesting facts about Newfoundland. Especially the 44 species of orchids! Orchids? I always presumed these flowers needed lots of hot, humid weather. No wonder I always have problems with them!
    Have a wonderful weekend. 🙂

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    • My understanding is these orchids are w.i.l.d., and to my recollection they may be smaller than I imagine. Still 44 varieties aren’t something you’d turn up your nose anytime. Must be the ocean air they like. NFL isn’t humid like British Columbia, so a different breed again.
      Thank you for the visit always. ❤ ❤ ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Good to see you back, Tess. Hope all is well. So many are on board with that lack of ragweed. And 3 years for the salmon? I had no idea. Chickens mature in 6 weeks. That might explain a lot about our diet ? ☺

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    • I was surprised how long it took a salmon to be ‘worthy’ of capture. A person might starve waiting three years, right? Still, those little guys are real troopers. It’s a wonder they don’t tucker out swimming upstream and back again. I would. o_O
      Six weeks for chickens? Is that “accelerated” growth due to hormones we don’t hear about?
      I bought chicken breasts the size you’d expect they were turkey. I have pictures. New buy them again. Breasts with muscles. Ugh. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Tess, happy to see you back, and to read your travel posts again! I’m with others on no ragweed or snakes. Interesting fact about the salmon! Love learning things about your trips! And the photos are a big plus! Have a wonder-filled weekend! 💛 Elizabeth

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    • Elizabeth heartwarming to be back. Thank you. I was amazed regarding the ragweed and snakes. We have them everywhere else in Canada it seems. Yuck.
      Wonderful to be back to be among all my blogging friends. ❤ ❤ ❤

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  11. Welcome back! I have been waiting for the end of the Newfoundland trip. Do we still say ‘Red Indians’? I thought we encouraged to say ‘Native Americans’. I have seen these fish ladders before in Ireland.

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  12. Ragweed has spread far and wide and few people seem to deal with it to stop more spreading where we live, it is such a shame. Lovely to have you back Tess.

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    • Lovely to be back Rose Hope it’s not short term.
      Ragweed is rampant where I live too but I do not suffer from it. Yet. Although lately, I have had this eye-thing going on–too early for ragweed. A place without it sounds heavenly, doesn’t it. I know of so many sufferers because of it. ❤ ❤ ❤

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  13. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    Delighted to read another episode of the trip through Newfoundland with Tess Karlinski. I love fresh salmon and Tess shares the life cycle of this king of fish.

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  14. Pingback: Mention in Dispatches – Outstanding blog posts this week. | Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life

  15. Interesting. I loved the pictures. 🙂 — Suzanne

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    • Thanks so much for the visit. The pictures help, I believe, at least they do for me when I read other blogs. Am not a photo-type person and have had to snap-to to remember to click photos. Now, I enjoy them too because I remember better. ❤ ❤ ❤

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  16. Welcome ‘home’ Tess. ❤

    What is a 'mug up'?

    And I love your quest for knowledge, and your skill at sharing it. I had no idea about the salmon.

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  17. I love smoked salmon. It’s delightful in a salad on a hot summer day. With that said though, I have to separate myself from what I know is the life they lead. It fascinates me. The way they struggle up those streams to reach that one destination to lay their eggs is spectacular. And there’s those bears along the way who are so hungry.

    BTW Tess, I know you’d do the same for me.

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    • I love smoked salmon too though have only enjoyed it a couple of time–I hear salmon smoked are high calorie (no, I don’t understand why–makes no sense to me, but I agree, d.e.l.i.c.i.o.u.s ❤ )
      Good for the bears.
      I agree. I AM here and will willingly wish to do the same for you.. ❤ ❤ ❤

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  18. I had to look up ragweed; seems Europe is beginning to get it. Thanks for the export! I guess that’s payback for the crap we’ve sent your way. I love salmon ladders. We saw some in Vancouver and also learnt about the different types of salmon. They have to be the most persistent of creatures. Glad you are back and posting, Tess

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    • Nice to be back–hope there are no roadblocks ahead–for a while.
      Funny, how when young we could care less about so much. Now, I want to know everything about everything. Fish is good to know about. We need to preserve them because I like to eat.
      NFL is interested regarding what they have not and have because somebody decided to import this or that. Other imports are bugs which also change the ecological system. o_O

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  19. Now if there were only no mosquitoes in addition to the snakes. The salmon life cycle is fascinating – they travel thousands of miles in the ocean before returned to where they came from to spawn. What a homing device!

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    • I so agree about the mosquitoes because no matter where i go, they find me. It does not thrill me I am popular. Nothing works against them.
      Isn’t it strange how I could care less about this wonderful information thirty / twenty years ago. Now I want to know everything about everything. Indeed, the salmon are amazing. It’s a wonder they don’t expire in their journey and return. Lucky grocery buying people. 😀 ❤ ❤

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  20. I live in Salmon country too, Tess. We’re very protective of our spawning grounds and salmon waterways, though I’ve never seen a fish ladder, I assume we have a few. I like it when people try to mitigate the damage we do to natural habitats. Glad to see you back and have a peaceful weekend 🙂

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    • Nice to see you, D.W.P. In NFL the fish stocks became depleted due to over-fishing by internationals. It took about 20 years for the fishing industry to come back. In the meantime fishermen had to scramble for another way to make a living. Not a lot of opportunity where fishing was king, but they tried lots of ways to make a living. Hard times for years. 🙂 ❤

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  21. Tess a delight to reconnect with you. I am so sorry to hear that your absence is the result of a difficult time. Know i am sending hugs and positive energy across the miles. xo

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    • Thank you and I wholeheartedly appreciate the hugs. They are more than welcome. We are experiencing a rough patch but I hope there won’t be any roadblock for a long, long time. XX I’m so glad to be back. Miss you all. This summer will be five years blogging for me and though it took two blogs–one deleted–and some time to get to HERE with all my favorite people, I wouldn’t trade this experience for anything. 🙂 ❤ ❤

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  22. Thanks for your wonderful post. Great pictures. 🙂

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  23. There are salmon ladders on the Exe, in my city, if it helps that good. That old piano is a beauty. Tess, it’s good to see you and read your posts again, your way with words is unique and lovely.

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    • Nice to be back and hope no roadblocks lie ahead for a while.
      I thought this would be a boring stop, but I’m amazed who these ‘ladders’ let the fish in and out and how the stock has grown. I had no idea other countries / place did this work too. In NFL, the stocks of various fish had been depleted by international fishing and the fishermen had no jobs for about 20 years. The fish are coming back and there is work again.
      😀 😀 I love this blogging business because I learn so much from everyone. ❤ ❤

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  24. Welcome back Tess. Interesting story about salmon here. I know quite a bit about fish, coming from a family who was in the fish business for over half a century. 🙂

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    • I thought ‘boring’ when we arrived at the preservation center, but it wasn’t. Not at all. I’m interested in everything now, even fish, unlike my younger days when everything was b.o.r.i.n.g.
      Thanks for the welcome, Debby. How goes it with YOU? If you want to chat e-mail, I’m good. Hope all is well and good. ❤ ❤ ❤

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  25. In Oregon, my dad used to like to tell people he was in a step program – then he’d explain it was the Salmon Trout Enhancement Program. The program raised salmon and made sure waterways were clear for fish to migrate around. Perhaps Dad thought this was balance for all the fish he caught and consumed in his youth. Really enjoyed your post and all the details and photos!

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    • Thank you for reading, Amy. Thank you for sharing about your Dad and the Salmon Trout Enhancement Program.
      In Newfoundland, it has taken 20 years to increase stock of many kinds of due to over fishing by internationals. This killed the fishing industry in NFL causing years of hardship for the men who made a living at fishing.
      It’s heartwarming to know that though we have been greedy, we CAN with patience, fix some problems like these salmon.

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  26. Glad to see you back, sweet friend ♥ I am sending love! I see there is salmon to enjoy there on Canada’s east coast. I am on the west coast and we have a salmon run at Goldstream Park that you will have to check out one day! I’ll join you there for a gal’s outing 🙂

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  27. I love reading this about the salmon and your trip (and having you back here on the blog for us). When I lived in the SF bay area, we had a ‘salmon release day,’ and the kids were encouraged to ‘kiss the salmon’ (they didn’t actually kiss them) but they were part of the release into the bay – great way to get children to understand fish and nature and swimming upstream in life. 🙂

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    • Indeed. Kids in cities miss so much. Shoot. I missed so much because i wasn’t outgoing. Am working to fix that now–maybe not fix but grab some while I can.
      Thank you for your continued support. Good to be back and hope there are no bumps in the road ahead–at least for a long while. ❤ ❤ ❤

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  28. Hi Tess: Packed of information as usual. Fascinated about the salmon information. And 44 species of orchids. I love orchids (I’m good at killing them though…) . 🙂

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  29. Another great post about your wonderful trip to Newfoundland. Learning so much through you. Glad you are back.

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    • Thank you for your kind little heart and for your visit.
      If it wasn’t for blogging about it, the details of this trip would already be gone. Writing about it brings my experience back and I am now more fully AWARE of what we heard and saw. ❤ ❤ ❤ Yes. I'm surprised, too.

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  30. You are a great tour guide. You must have a lot of energy and stamina. I’d be pooped by tea time.

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    • I’ve always been a fast walker and love walking. Don’t know about the tour guide part because I don’t like talking a lot and you need to, plus have the knowledge to share. I rather leave that to someone else.
      Nice to see you, Patricia. Thanks so much for the visit and for adding to the conversation. XX

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  31. So glad you are back. Really missed you.

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  32. I prefer to catch salmon the old fashioned way: standing in the river, waiting for them to leap up a small waterfall, and catching them in my mouth.

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  33. I’ve seen a couple of fish ladders Tess, and I’m always amazed at how well they work. We were in Alaska for the annual salmon migration, and seeing that number of salmon at once was amazing. Of course, we had to keep an eye out, because the hungry bears also saw all these tasty-looking salmon. BTW, you may have noticed that things have been quiet at Gallivance lately. Terri blew here knee out and had to have a total knee replacement surgery recently, so as you can imagine, her recovery and care have kept us both pretty busy. She’s progressing well, but it’s slow going. We haven’t forgotten about our friends and look forward to things getting back to normal. In the meantime, thanks for continuing to follow along. ~James

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    • Thank you for your visit. Salmon ARE fascinating to me after this trip. 😀
      I haven’t been around much myself for over a month. Sound painful. After the surgery, I hope Terri heals well. Some downtime isn’t a bad thing. Time to make new plans, maybe? Sending you both positive energy.

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  34. Super interesting post. Thanks

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