How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE

Beothuks and more

69 Comments


Today I have a mishmash of tidbits. This hadn’t been an exciting day but one filled with lots of interesting information.

On the move again. Luggage out by 6:30 a.m. Buffet breakfast at 7:00 and on the bus by 8:00 a.m. Another wet day pressing the windshield wipers into service. Swish-swish.

Francis, our guide, read a poem: http://www.linda-ellis.com/the-dash-the-dash-poem-by-linda-ellis-.html. Check it out. Maybe you’ll enjoy it, too.

A couple from our group shared a strange incident from the night before. One of them had flipped through the TV channels for something entertaining. A particular station clicked, the air conditioner snapped on. Clicked again, and it turned off. They wondered what else might be off.

A moose will challenge anything in its way. We passed a moose killed on the road the previous night, but I didn’t see it, and we couldn’t slow down even though others asked.

Because we weren’t going to see icebergs today, Francis popped in a DVD about them. Did you know icebergs are about 10 stories high? Pieces break off, the berg rolls over and continues breaking off until it melts in summer. Check this out:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dysuQIDtdoM (Something has changed in WordPress, I can’t seem to insert videos here lately.)

First stop, the Beothuk Interpretation Centre

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Beothuk Facts:

A short stop at Little Harbour, which has one street. In June and July, there are icebergs here, but not during out visit. The weather windy, nippy and overcast, we strolled down the one short street and took pictures of root cellars, the rocky shore and the few houses.

Houses along the one road. Not a car passed us.

Old root cellar. Painted door in good repair, it must still be in use..

IMG_1828

More Quick Facts about Newfoundland:

  • The twin towers in New York were built by Newfoundlanders
  • Newfoundland only place you’ll find Pineapple Crush. Everyone else knows Orange Crush.
  • Doctors Banting and Best co-discovered insulin
  • Experimented on dogs
  • A boy at death’s door was first human to be injected with insulin (miraculous recovery)
  • Planting starts in early June: carrots and potatoes
  • Tomatoes need a greenhouse
  • Farmers use Biodegradable_plastic over plants to keep in heat and protect from early spring frost

Capelin Facts:

  • Capelin – member of the smelt family
  • Harvested for Japanese market
  • Russians also came to do the same
  • Especially for female roe /males discarded
  • 30 – 40% are male (a market must be found for them)
  • Occasionally an overloaded boat swamped
  • Fishermen made the best of their catch
  • A lucky fisherman took all he wanted from his nets
  • Some fishermen buddied up to make the most of a day’s catch
  • http://www.fish-fishes.com/salt_water_fish/capelin_fish.html
  • Are food for cod and puffins (we didn’t see these either as we were too late in the season)

Old Irish Tradition: Mummery (check link for Mummers’ costumes and song)

During the 12 days of Christmas, 25 to 30 people could knock on someone’s door. They’d be invited inside, given a piece of chocolate cake, and a drink for adults. Everyone tried to identify each other. The visitors performed plays, sang, played instruments, danced, and had a good time. This old tradition is now enjoyed only at Hallowe’en.

* * *

Next on May 20th – Twillington

© 2015 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles. All Rights Reserved.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page

Thank you for reading and commenting. I appreciate your kind support.
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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

69 thoughts on “Beothuks and more

  1. This one was jam packed full of information. Very interesting. I loved the ice burg roll over.

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  2. Even with the overcast skies, the pictures are pretty. Must have been interesting to see. I love the blue door.

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  3. We don’t see so many high pitched roofs…no snow. Lovely pics and a real lesson here.

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    • I lived in North Eastern Canada where there were lots of flat roofs, but mostly in the shopping district (about a dozen stores). The houses had peaked roofs due to lots of snow I suppose, but that doesn’t answer for the stores.
      Glad you enjoyed the read. ❤ ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I love that old root cellar and blue door. You just don’t see things like that around these parts. Impressive that there wasn’t any traffic. Wow, that’s unheard of where I live. Looks like it was an interesting experience. 🙂

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    • This was a wonderful experience, Paulette. Sharing here lets me relive an enjoyable time.
      I’d love to see what’s behind the root cellar door–which was locked.
      As far as traffic, the population is small compared to land mass. In St. John’s is where the action begins.

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  5. Hi Tess. I’m kind of awed about the icebergs… gosh. It’s a picturesque, lovely place, ad downright fascinating. Thanks for taking us on the tour with you! Mega hugs. 🙂 ⭐

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    • I would have loved to see an iceberg. They say what you see up top is only 1/3 of the thing. Two-thirds is underwater. Can you imagine?
      I enjoy sharing this here because I get to relive the experience again and I so enjoyed my time in NFL.
      Hope you’re enjoying a great weekend.

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  6. Tess, another interesting, jam packed post. Love the blue door root cellar. And the houses, short streets with no traffic. Looks a bit desolate though. The quick facts are fascinating. Who knew Newfoundland had such importance. Have a wonderful weekend! 💛 Elizabeth

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    • Hi, Elizabeth. Yes, I love the blue door as well. Too bad it was locked, I’d love a peek inside.
      I’m getting more out of the ‘quick facts’ second time around. Sharing the trip is a wonderful opportunity to relive this experience again.
      Newfoundland is a huge place with not many people. Wonderful weekend to you too. ❤

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  7. I love seeing how early people lived, without all of our modern conveniences. I can’t imagine going a day without washing my hair, much less not changing clothes.

    OK, I’m off track, totally inspired by one of your pictures!

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    • I know what you mean. Interesting though they are, I’m used to my creature comforts.
      I’m currently reading a first person account of a woman who decided to do the Camino for her 50th birthday and the creature comforts she missed, how she cried and was covered in mud and rain etc. etc.
      Probably not your kind of book but if you’re interested, I can give your title and author.

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  8. Tess, I loved the pictures of the Beothuks.How did they repurpose the nails, screws and nuts? The houses look a lot like the ones you see in coastal Maine.

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    • I agree, the Beothuks (as other first peoples everywhere) were interesting and so ill-treated by explorers.
      They re-purposed the iron by flattening it into tools. The tools you see in the pictures are from nails and such.
      There’s something about fishing towns. I remember colorful houses in Halifax as well.

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  9. Full of great tidbits of information Tess. I hope one day that we will do a road trip of Nfld and take our time exploring. Great information about those icebergs. 10 stories high! Nature is quite the architect.

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    • I so wish we could have seen the icebergs (and the whales, puffins, and had a feed of fresh lobster). The tour before us would have had those experiences, but that window was closed by the time we arrived. Sigh.
      Hope you do make it. It’s a lovely place. The people are warm, friendly, and helpful.

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  10. Loved this Tess.

    A friend of mine of 30 years did a student exchange from Australia to Newfoundland in his teens. His tales have always fascinated me and I’m determined to visit one day. Moving to Toronto from Australia I’m one step closer.

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    • Every post I write about my time there last fall, puts me body and soul back to Newfoundland. Not only can I share, I get to relive my adventure.
      When are you coming to Toronto? Are you originally from Canada?

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      • We have been living in Toronto for 6 months. My husband is Canadian and our son is 9-years-old. We thought it was time to give living in Canada a bit of a go so our son can spend more time with Canadian relatives etc.

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  11. Cool! I didn’t know you were on a trip. Love the photos.

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    • Hi Len. I’m not away. This is from my trip last September. Nice to see you. ❤ I learned to take pictures because everyone around me was taking them. Had to remind myself. Wonderful how they bring back memories.

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  12. Love your factual bullet points

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  13. Tidbits are great, I would like to go there.

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  14. Some great information here. I love that blue door to the root cellar. There could be a story there!!

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  15. Full of interesting information as usual. Those coloured houses remind me of Iceland.

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  16. Appreciate the history lesson ! I think they’ve very recently found some Viking stuff up there that’s changing theories on their settlement NF.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. I’m part Ponca, a tribe cousin to the Dakota. This information about a first tribe being way over in Newfoundland is intriguing. Still, from what all I’ve read, people coming over the land bridge on the Pacific side is documented as the first place of crossing. Seeing that all Native Americans have the same mouth palate as Asians, the land bridge theory makes sense.

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    • I find it despicable that the First Nations people everywhere had been so ill-treated by those who came AFTER to grab what they could and establish themselves in the new place they discovered. In Canada, the Indian people are still not well treated.

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  18. So happy for you that you’re getting to see some of the beautiful ‘Rock’! My husband and I lived there twice during his banking career and absolutely loved our time there. Looking forward to reading about more of your adventures soon. Thanks for sharing!

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    • Hi, Sylvia. It’s been a long time. Love your latest photo. You look marvelous.
      I was in NFL last September and am enjoying the adventure once again through this sharing. Hope to see you again. Thanks for the visit. Nice talking with you. ❤ 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  19. What a fascinating history Tess, but it annoys me how Europeans tramped around the world took whatever they wanted and destroyed cultures.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Fascinating info here as always Tess, and great photos! Are you sure you weren’t a travel journalist in another life? 🙂 ❤

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    • Glad you’re still enjoying the tour, Debby. Can you see me blush? Thank YOU. While reliving this holiday, I want to share my experience as interactively as I can. That’s the beauty of the internet. ❤ ❤ ❤
      The lack of icebergs, whales, puffins and a good feed of lobster is my loss, though.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Well yes, I’d say no lobsters is the greatest loss, lol. But seriously Tess, you have an amazing way of reporting. Maybe you should start travelling the world and writing a column – Places to see with Tess. 🙂 xo

        Liked by 1 person

      • It would be fun to travel and write, but I enjoy popping out for an adventure once in a while. I like home, my laptop and my grandchildren. Travel is also tiring and I’m not the spring chicken I remember. 🙂

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  21. I love traveling with you Tess. Thank you for the iceberg roll. My lesson for the day!

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    • You are welcome, Colleen and shucks, look at me blush. It’s gratifying you find any of this interesting, that’s why I hunt the internet for links to help you see my experience better. (No icebergs, whales, lobster or puffins for me. Sigh). Happy to have you along. ❤ 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  22. I never have the option of seeing an iceberg. Awesome post. Looks like a great part of the world.

    Tim

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    • Thank you for the visit and for adding to the conversation.
      It is a wonderful part of the world. I missed the icebergs, as well the whales and puffins. Our tour was an extra after the end of the season because there were so many people on the waiting list. We were also too late for a good feed of lobster. Still, I thoroughly enjoyed my time in Newfoundland though the weather did not cooperate.

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  23. Thanks for reading my little post on Chris Graham’s The Story Reading Ape! You’ve definitely got one up on me in the organization department. All that research… 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Fantastic way to re-experience it all. Love the information you provide too. I wonder how it must be to live in that place with only one street. I guess one would need to visit several places to catch everything in season…Thanks, Tess!

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  25. Sounds like a amazing trip. The pictures are beautiful and I learned a lot from your bullet facts. Have a safe trip and take it all in. @sheilamgood at Cow Pasture Chronicles

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  26. Beautiful pics as always, Tess! 😊

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  27. Lovely photos, the houses are so pretty…and an intriguing root store 🙂

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  28. Me too, especially in jewel tones.

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  29. Tess, do you travel all the time? I want your life.

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    • No. I don’t travel all the time, Linda. I’d given up on travel more than 20 years ago–wasn’t interested. Then the fluke of a cheap trip to China for 24 days fell into my lap through a friend who wanted to go but didn’t want to go alone. Then my trip to Newfoundland with my sister last fall and a trip to British Columbia for last New Years for another sister’s big birthday– and now I have the travel BUG.

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