How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE

Twillingate

86 Comments


Views along the road to Twillingate on our way to view a lighthouse

Stopped at Long Point Lighthouse at Twillingate to stretch our legs and for picture-taking. Constructed in 1876, it is under 50 feet tall and built more than 300 feet above sea level.

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Lunch had only one server yet again but the food arrived hot.. Because of the cold (again), I was anxious for a hot drink, but the coffee was slow coming. Shrimp on a croissant, fresh homemade fried potato chips and a smidge of limp green lettuce with lots of grated carrot were offered. For dessert, two small tarts each, a loganberry and the other, blueberry. Eh.

With 90 minutes to kill, we had plenty of time to explore.

St. Peter’s Anglican Church is 200 years old and one of the oldest wooden churches in Newfoundland. The oil lamps inside came from England. The pine in the English church came from Twillingate. The English wanted their lamps back. St. Peter’s agreed they could have them if England sent back the pine. No exchange was made.

St. Peter’s Cemetery is behind a fence and locked gate, situated behind the museum, and trails to the sea. This is both the old and current graveyard. Ninety-eight percent of the headstones are white. We couldn’t get close enough to read, but someone takes good care of this graveyard. Inside the museum is a complete record of headstones in the cemeteries in Twillingate and New World Island.

On our way to investigate the cemetery, we passed a woman with a couple large Ziploc bags. Mary called out to ask what she’d found. She straightened to show picked loganberries and partridge berries. We talked briefly, but she wanted to get back to work as it had begun to drizzle. A door-less root cellar beckoned high off the road. Though I scrambled towards it, the fall grass and weeds were slippery and I slid. Mary made it. She entered the space, which was littered with cigarette butts, empty pop cans and beer bottles, and the remnants of a camp fire or a few. She didn’t hang around long.

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I noted plants by the side of the road, which I knew to be blueberry bushes. Sure enough, like the woman picking berries behind us, we plucked handfuls to enjoy immediately. What an unexpected pleasure. Too bad neither of us had a container of any sort.

Twillingate Museum and Craft Store stands back  down the same side road. behind the church. It used to be St. Peter’s rectory. Inside, the rooms are decorated in the style at the turn of the century.

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I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves. The organ, I understand, still works. The study has a library of books and personal diaries dating to 1700’s. Of course, there was a gift shop and I splurged on a book.

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Twillingate Facts:

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Next on May 27th – Gander

© 2015 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles. All Rights Reserved.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

86 thoughts on “Twillingate

  1. It was fun to go berry picking with you Tess — indeed an unexpected pleasure. 😀
    I like the name Twillingate. Beautiful scenery in your photos. Thanks for letting us tag along. Mega hugs!

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    • When I was a kid, we used to go blueberry picking all the time. All the other kids ate them but I like to see the accumulation in my basket and saved the eating for later.
      Wonderful to see you along for this trip. Glad if you enjoy. ❤ ❤

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  2. These pictures definitely make me wish for a calmer time. I just finished Anne Cleaves series on Shetland Islands–rural living, lightly populated, everyone knows everyone. Lovely. Of course, it would probably drive me nuts in a few months!

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    • Someone else mentioned Shetland Island and your reading. I put it on my list of TBRs. If it wasn’t for my family living in Ontario, I could live in NFL. I am retired and don’t need much. It would be much cheaper living. 🙂

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  3. So nice to see new places. I love to read old tombstones and try to imagine the life of the person. Sorry, you could not get nearer. Thanks for taking us along.

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  4. Tess, love traveling along with you! Beautiful scenery! Interesting museum photos, the cast iron stove sort of like the one of my childhood! Nice shots of the cemetery, and the far away sea! Have a great weekend! 💛 Elizabeth

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    • Thank you for coming along, Elizabeth. I was and still am taken by this fascinating province. Love finding old time stoves, kitchens, paraphernalia. More pictures like that coming up in a few weeks.
      I was agog that the cemetery slipped almost to the sea. Unbelievable. 🙂

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  5. Gorgeous views Tess and I am so happy to see this through your eyes. Can you tell me what a Loganberry tart tastes like?

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  6. I love places like this, to visit . I could no more live there than fly to the moon. Great travalog as always. 😃 xxx

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  7. Love the name of the place, iceberg alley is fun too.

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  8. Such beautiful pics, Tess. And how I love a lighthouse !! ☺

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  9. Such incredible views up on those cliffs. Tess, have you ever had the opportunity to see the movie, The Grand Seduction? It is a story about a very small place in Newfoundland & the local’s quest to get a doctor. If you haven’t seen it, I think you would enjoy it!

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    • Wow. I just checked out YouTube and they have the full length movie, but it’s b.l.o.c.k.e.d. in my country. Watched a trailer, though. I’m Canadian and I love Gordon Pinsent. Thank you for the heads up. I’ll see if I can’t get a DVD. Love the trailer. Can’t wait to catch the movie. ❤ ❤ 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I enjoyed walking with you on this tour. The graveyard is gorgeous and the museum and gift shop are lovely. What a shame the church was locked.Thanks for taking me along on your blog today.

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    • The church wasn’t locked; it was the gate to the graveyard. I wanted an up-close look at the headstones but I’m too short to jump the fence. We did go inside the church, and I’m positive I took pictures–so small but well loved and polished–
      Thank you for following along. I appreciate the company and your interesting comments. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Twillingate sounds interesting. What book did you buy? I tend to pick up books during my travels as well. Love the graveyard. Great picture.

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  12. Despite the obvious cold, it must have been spectacular to see there places that are etched in history. I’d love to do a bus trip like this. I wonder why the eateries didn’t serve hot vegetables instead. Giving to the weather and the fresh vegetables being so poor, it would have been so much better with the warm veggies. Such is life I guess.

    Is that church leaning or was it your camera?

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    • Now that you mention it, it does appear the church has settled more on one side. Look at the foundation. I don’t recall a listing floor when we checked out the inside. It’s quite small inside.
      I swear I took pictures inside because the church was a quaint, but none on my iPad. Huh!

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  13. I’ve just listened to the last two Shetland novels like Jacqui above! And I’m re-watching the series on DVD. Your photos are very reminiscent of the Shetland Isles. I love places like that.

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  14. Stunning views along the way to this charming place Tess, did you enjoy it there? I’ve never seen blueberries growing wild, but I sure would like to!

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    • Thank you. I agree, the views were wonderful. As a child I used to pick blueberries by the basket. Loved them. Never ate them while picking like other kids. I like the accumulation in the basket, then my mother made wonder things to eat with them.

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  15. So cool!! There’s nothing more fun than discovering a graveyard, I don’t care what anyone says!

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  16. I love cemeteries. These pictures are wonderful.

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  17. Wonderful exploring with you. The white headstones really intrigue me – do you know what stone they’re carved from? Seems like a place to wander and revel. Not old perhaps as much as well grounded.

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  18. We want our lamps – we want our lamps!

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  19. I love little museums dotted along our way. They are the best!!!! I love the opening pictures Tess.

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  20. This is gorgeous, Tess, thank you so much for letting us travel with you, I hope we’re not too much trouble. lol 😉

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  21. Great photos. You sound more fit than I am. =)

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  22. What a fab blog you have. I will have to come back when I have more time to spend browsing. There is so much to se and enjoy. A girl after my own heart. I love to post about places I have visited and always take far to many photos and end up having a breakdown over which to share or not. This is heaven to me. 🙂 Oh and thanks so much for commenting on my guest author spot with Chris. x

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  23. I noticed though headstones being white before I read it and couldn’t help but wonder what type of stone they were made from. And yum on the blueberries. >3 🙂

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    • Everywhere we came across graveyards, the headstones were 99% white. There were some black and brown marble (probably). I haven’t been successful tracking down the material of these on line.
      We could even t.a.s.t.e. the wild blueberries, unlike the farmed ones from groceries stores (outrageously expensive) and the frozen ones which have no taste. 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  24. Sounds like another wonderful adventure, Tess. I love all the photos and fun facts!

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  25. I would love to look through the books dating back to the 1700s! Oh and I wouldn’t mind a few blueberries too, Tess 🙂

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  26. I love the look of the place and the museum is gorgeous. I love to go berry picking, although where I live it’s mostly blackberries. Thanks, Tess.

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    • What we saw of Twillingate was charming and the opportunity to explore for a change made everyone happy.
      When I was a kid, I always went picking for blueberries. Loved to see the basket fill up. Some parents took their kids my age, but they didn’t pick–only moaned to go home. Not me. 😀
      Thanks for the visit, Olga.

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  27. Love the pics! I also love the name Twillingate. I want to live in a place named Twillingate.

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    • Thanks, Mike. Pictures help remember what I am likely to forget.
      I’m positive I took pictures inside that wee church, but I don’t have one. My iPad must have gobbled them up.
      I like the name too. Sounds old-fashioned and cozy. 😀

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  28. lovely pictures though I notice you’ve not had much sunshine. The church looks lovely too.

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  29. One thing I really love about WordPress is one can go on these beautiful photo tours without leaving home (where I mostly reside these days!) Thank you, Let’s CUT the CRAP!

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    • I whole heartedly approve of the armchair traveler. I have been one for twenty years till I fell into such a good travel deal I couldn’t say no. Now I have the travel but. I love sharing because I get to enjoy my tour / trip a second time around. Picture make my memories clearer. Thank you for reading. You are welcome along anytime. 🙂

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      • I’ll be happy to tag along via my armchair! Thank you for that invite… Thought my retirement would be movies, travel, the theatre, etc., but, alas… However, blogs on WordPress like yours are a pleasure to discover!

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  30. Iceberg Alley has long been on my list of must-visit places. I’ve heard it is absolutely magnificent when the icebergs are moving in this channel. I don’t think I’d ever get tired of looking out over the rocky cliffs.

    Loved the photos from the museum!

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    • We missed it. Too late in the season. Just contacted our tour guide about a couple questions. One of the tourists from Germany was in Newfoundland a.g.a.i.n. for two weeks recently, and hooked up for dinner with our guide and his wife in St. John’s. What other place can have this kind of access? I wrote to him yesterday about the material the white headstones in the cemeteries are and he wrote back the next day. He’s supposed to be retired from tour work this year, but he’s set up for four tours in 2016. Where else, but NFL can you have that kind of access to guides and get response to emails nine months after your tour? ❤ ❤ ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  31. I wonder if those headstones are all painted to preserve the stone from the salt air? Remarkable clarity in the old stones you photographed. They look stunning.

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