How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE

The First English Settlement and Oil

76 Comments


The day began with a disappointing fog, thick as porridge and I worried about the drive. On the bright side, the road wasn’t as winding as the previous day, but visibility wasn’t good. Soon, a fine drizzle drifted in. Mary and I weren’t in the front seat anymore, but back a couple seats. Yay.

The bus stopped in Whitbourne at Robyn’s Donut Shop for hot coffee and a stretch. It’s similar to Timmy’s in Ontario, but this establishment was takeout only. Two interesting travelers were pushing off as we exited. I wanted to ask about their biking adventures but didn’t want to run after them, nor come across as a stalker.

First English settlement

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In 1610 John Guy arrived from England with 39 men and meager supplies. They wintered in Cupids Cove (Plantation) and began building houses. The area was rocky and covered with mulberry, pine, spruce and fir trees. He returned to England the following year and came back with 16 women. Building started in earnest and more settlers followed. He attempted to establish trade with the Beothuks. In 1613 he left again never to return but became a Member of Parliament in his native land.

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We moved on to Cupids Legacy Centre, a building chock full of old collections, which took me down memory lane. Here’s a look inside and out.

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Some displays inside Legacy Centre:

Offshore Oil Quick Facts:

  • Hibernia 315 km from St. John’s
  • 200 miles offshore
  • 240 feet high / 224 meters
  • 33 meters higher than Calgary
  • Pumping 120,000 barrels a day
  • Cost $6 Billion
  • 1985 accord signed. Government wanted full control.
  • Why should Newfoundland be treated any different from Alberta?
  • Argued until PM Mulroney got in. Gulf oil bowed out.
  • Most oil fields have around a 20-year lifespan
  • Latest News June 17, 2016

Hebron Facts:

  • Hebron Project
  • Drilling begun 1981
  • 4 major fields: ExonMobil, Suncor, Statoil, Nalcor
  • Coming in a year or so (after 2015)
  • Contains 1.2 billion barrels of oil
  • Good for 20 years or more
  • Negotiated better deals than Alberta
  • Province gets 1%
  • After all costs paid, Newfoundland gets super royalty over the 30% they usually get
  • Funds go into general coffers
  • Hope a fund is set up for renewable resources

~ * ~

On the Lighter Side:

A young couple who tried to conceive met their old parish priest while walking down the street.

“How’s the family?”

“None. Can’t”

“I’m on my way to Rome. I’ll light a candle for you.”

Five years later, Mary was heavily pregnant when she met the priest again.

“I see it’s all working out for you.”

“Don’t talk, Father. Shortly after you said you were going to Rome and would light a candle, I had twins. After, I had another one. Now again.

“Good. Good. By the way, where is John?”

“He’s gone to Rome to blow out the candle.”

* * *

© 2016 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

76 thoughts on “The First English Settlement and Oil

  1. Interesting history of “firsts” and nice to find a doughnut/coffee place in that weather. One of the bikes was carrying a lot of stuff, how’d he manage to ride it? Thanks, Tess. 🙂

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    • Who knew? Not me. That list grabbed me right away because my eyes popped. Really? Amazing.
      Thank you for the visit, Paulette. I wished I’d had the opportunity to talk to these ‘young’ people. I don’t know how the fellow got so much on his bike. I would have loved to buy them coffee / breakfast / lunch / anything to talk about their adventure. My mouth waters thinking about it. o_O

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  2. How interesting. I rarely think of the first colonists in Canada–and I should. What a fascinating place to visit.

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  3. I enjoyed the enlightening history lesson, photos, and the joke and the end.

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  4. Lovely! Enjoyed the ending chuckle too.

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  5. So much history here. I love the exhibits of a life style no longer lived.
    And your funny section has me giggling.

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    • Wonderful to see you come along for this tour, Sharon. I had no idea Newfoundland would be so interesting.
      Our tour guide, Francis is 5th generation Irish in Newfoundland and full to bursting with hilarious jokes. ❤ 😀 😀

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  6. Perhaps the young couple were going on the Wetlands Conservation Trail in Whitbourne, Tess? Can’t read what it says on the first bike ” We need a ride Fortune”? And I wonder who the first English child was to be born in Canada – must be a story there!! And someone has a fascinating family history. Jx

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  7. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    It is Saturday morning and my scheduled stop on the road with Tess Karlinski as she tours Newfoundland – today the first English settlement.. interesting facts about the area and a little maths for you.. John Guy arrived with 39 men and meagre supplies in 1610 – the following year he returned to England and bought just 16 women back with him – with 39 men in the colony I would think that was when the fight started! Great post as always.. head over and read for yourselves.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Loved the list of firsts. And I laughed out loud when I got to the joke. I’d have made John go blow out the candle too 😀 😀

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    • The list of first grabbed my attention right away and I was surprised there were so many. Who knew?
      Our tour guide was full of jokes. None of them dull. Some hard to understand till the light went on. I keep wondering how he knew which candle to blow out? Maybe all of them? 😀 😀 😀 Catholics (I guess that’s Irish Catholics too) weren’t allowed birth control, except for rhythm–I think.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. So many things here I didn’t know. But the antiques in that legacy center…so many are familiar. Thanks, Tess. 💖

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  10. Tess, you make every road trip so interesting. Sorry about the fog… I enjoyed the antiques. Too bad you didn’t get a chance to meet those very interesting looking cyclists. 😀 Have a satisfying Saturday. Mega hugs.

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    • Glad you’re enjoying the tour, Teagan. I’m still excited about this trip even second time around posting it. This particular day I took 151 pictures, but I feel there are a lot I took that seem to be missing. 😉
      Have a wonderful rest of the weekend as well. ❤

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  11. This was a very interesting stop. Love museums like this. Some interesting facts.

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    • Thank you, Darlene. They had so many old things to see. I’m positive I took more pictures but somehow they didn’t take. That one day alone I took 151 pictures. Yeah. Surprised me too. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • I always think I took way more pictures than I actually did. It is great that with digital cameras we can take as many pictures as we wish. I remember being so careful not to use up all the film before.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. No Timmie’s? Lol that was an interesting fact. The old photos were awesome to see, And I’m ashamed to say that I wasn’t aware there was oil on the East coast. Thanks for the lessons Tess. ❤

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  13. What a fun time, interesting facts and great joke! Another one of your travels, I see I have much to catch up on.

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  14. Your posts are always so enlightening, Tess. Lots of firsts in Cupids. Thanks for the laugh too 😀

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  15. Thank goodness everybody didn’t throw away all of their old rubbish or there would be no exhibits for reconstruction museums.
    I have just been to Baltimore in Ireland where they like to tell you that English settlers in Maryland named the modern city there!

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  16. Interesting post – and I loved the joke.

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  17. What an interesting historic site. I was wondering where John Guy came from got my answer, Bristol again!

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  18. Love the firsts, the pictures and the joke!

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  19. I’m always interested in the history of places. Enjoyed all the photos Tess!

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  20. Tess I can not imagine riding a bike like that! Wow the things you see when you travel. Such interesting history. Too bad about the weather. Ugh to that!

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  21. Oh I wish you asked the bikers! Can’t quite make out the sign on the one bike, but can see the engagement notice on the other one.

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  22. My wife and I love traveling and enjoying the history of those places we are lucky enough to visit. I enjoyed your post. Stop by if you get a chance.

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  23. You had me laughing out loud!

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  24. I love the history!!! How exciting to be digging up more of the story. 🙂

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  25. Love the joke and the historical note (and the museum looks indeed like a trip down memory lane). I love the idea of the just married couple in their bike honeymoon. Thanks, Tess!

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    • Glad you liked the joke. We were rolling in the aisles of the bus when the tour guide told it. I so wish I had cast all cares to the wind and run after this couple to talk with them. Next time, I’ll take the chance and not worry about consequences first. 🙂 ❤

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  26. That’s a lot of ‘firsts’, Tess, this was a fascinating post, as always, made me want to go. Made me smile, laugh and smile some more. 🙂

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    • I learned so many fascinating things on this trip. Only in Canada. Why do we need exotic places far, far away when we have all this fascinating stuff going on in our own backyard. Glad you enjoyed the read, Donna. Hope this week is kind to you. ❤ ❤ ❤

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  27. Such interesting facts about Newfoundland! Thanks for sharing.

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  28. Cupids? Great name for a town. And all that old home stuff; like my gran’s!

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  29. Colonists in Canada is not a topic I know much about, though I’ve visited a view colonial sites in America. It’s always great to come away with more background knowledge. I’ve only been to Canada a few times, which is a shame because I grew up not too far from the British Columbia border.

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    • I have lived in Canada most of my life and until this visit to our east coast, I wasn’t much interested in that area. I had no idea what I’ve been missing. Hope to get to Canada again if you really want to.
      Thank you for the visit and for adding to the conversation. 🙂

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  30. I have been to Canada quite often on business. I find the area that I visit ( Cambridge) very good to be around. I would love to visit the more remote parts.

    Tim

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    • I sometimes think the Canadian North (Ontario) is pretty remote. Beautiful country. Lots of lakes and good fishing. Can you tell I lived there? Maybe that’s why I enjoyed the east coast so much. Water, rocks, fishing and miles and miles of nothing on the highway.
      Thanks for the visit. Hope you get to see more of Canada. 😀 😀

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  31. Brilliant! The candle joke is classicly wonderful. The post too, recently returned from Vancouver Island I am still enjoying the photos of the tressle and the logging museum.

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