How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE

Beijing: Part 4

29 Comments


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Image Courtesy of Sally Cronin

We wandered to another part of the park where parents laid out their child’s ‘resume’ hoping for a marriage connection/partner. A woman yelled at me when I tried to take a picture. Seems it’s bad luck to be photographed.

Spring in all its glory                                                      Spring in all its glory

I understood it puts a pox on the intended. I laid low and managed a non-intrusive video on my iPad mini but I cannot upload it. However, I copied a frame from the video. Note the sheets on the ground.

img_0160-copy_moment

Interesting nuggets about marriage:

  • Either you pay for a matchmaker ($$$ if you have lots—probably not) or your mother struggles along in your best interests with or without your knowledge
  • We encountered children in the park, but the majority were boys—yes there were girls—the odds appeared greater than the statistics
  • The ratio: 140 boys are born to 100 girls nowadays
  • Dating services are now common and do a vigorous business, but many cannot afford them and anyway MOM has your best interests at heart
  • Young people pursue good careers and work long hours with lengthy travel times to and from work
  • There is no time to date
  • More and more young people prefer to find their own mate
  • Some young men hold down several jobs and still cannot afford a house or apartment
  •  Every potential bride wants a house or apartment. As well her family expects a bride price—even in the country—a sort of dowry
  • Mismatches between city vs. country/education vs. job level mean less chance of finding a marriageable partner
  • Stories abound about established career women. A female with a good job may be willing to stand in as breadwinners if even a younger male would co-operate. After all, her clock is ticking, but without a job of his own, he’ll shy away.
  • Rich men spent much time and money choosing the right bride through matchmakers since the ratio of females versus males are so uneven

Wikipedia Commons

                                     Image courtesy of Wikipedia Commons

More tidbits about the people:

  • Diabetes and high blood pressure high
  • Exercises morning and evening, especially seniors
  • China is second highest consumer of sugar after India
  • They add sugar to everything
  • Different breakfast by area/region
  • Average man’s breakfast is in Beijing: steamed dumplings and buns, dim sum, and soup
  • Use straw to drink soup
  • Mandarin is the main official language
  • Written language is the same everyone in China, only the dialects are different

~ * ~

Next on February 10th: Beijing Part 5 (and more photos)

  1. Temple of Heaven
  2. Tiananmen Square

~ * ~

© 2017 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

FYI: This is a re-blog of the best parts of my trip in 2014.

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Author: Let's CUT the Crap!

I'm getting a little LONG in the tooth and have things to say about---ouch---AGEing. I believe it's certainly a state of mind but sometimes it's nice to hear that you're NORMAL. I enjoy reading by the truckload. I'm a grandma but I don't feel OLD although I'm not so young anymore. My plan is to stick it out as long as I can on this lovely planet and only will leave it kicking and screaming!

29 thoughts on “Beijing: Part 4

  1. You are a treasure-trove of information with these travelogues, Tess. The ratio of boys to girls really creeps me out — makes me wonder how they really got the statistics to be that way…
    Thanks for another great trip. Mega hugs!

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  2. That’s a good question, Teagan about the male/female ratio. This is fascinating, Tess, thank you!

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  3. I am so loving this. I remember reading all of this the first time. Now I am re-reading and finding stuff I missed the first time.

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  4. What a great post, a view into a new culture and really like that wedding photo. 🙂

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  5. Interesting post, Tess. Thank you.

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  6. Very interesting to learn these things. 140 boys for every 100 girls? Yikes. I knew they were facing a crisis like that, but I didn’t realize the disparity was so great already. Those poor women. The men will be chasing them like crazy!

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  7. Oh my, what in interesting collection of tidbits Tess.

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  8. I’m really pleased I didn’t need to be involved in any matchmaking of my children. Can you imagine the pressure to get it right?

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  9. Written language is the same everyone in China, only the dialects are different – this is a wonderful way to think about the oneness of all people.

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  10. I don’t remember you being there in cherry blossom time Tess, or perhaps yo didn’t post many photos?

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  11. The marriage facts are interesting although I find them quite sad. Didn’t know that about the sugar intake, I always thought the Chinese were a healthy race. Thanks for a very interesting post, Tess 🙂

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  12. Oh Tess, you have given all those people a dose of bad luck!

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  13. I’m still learning from your trip!

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  14. Interesting tidbits, Tess. The sugar intake really surprised me.

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  15. Arranged marriages used to be common in so many places. I know a couple from India who are my age and are together because the parents arranged it. What I find strange about their marriage, though, is the man is Greek Orthodox and the woman was Hindu when they got married. Of course, the woman, now, is Greek Orthodox too.

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  16. Some very interesting facts Tess. I was surprised that they had such a high rate of diabetes but then I didn’t know they are the 2nd largest consumer of sugar!

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  17. This is so interesting, Tess. I did know some of these things but it is really different to hear them spoken of in an everyday setting like this. Tweeted this on @bakeandwrite.

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  18. Chinese culture is really different from that of Western culture! Your post is fascinating and eye-opening. For years I was good friends with a woman from Hong Kong that lived near me who had a medical visa to live here while her young daughter was being treated for a serious medical condition. I got to know her quite well and we went out for dim sum at least once a month at a restaurant in Sacramento (where I live). Once her daughter passed away, she had to move back. Her strict regimen for her exercise, eating habits, work habits, etc are amazing. Restrictive but it’s her lifestyle.

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  19. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    My weekend secret pleasure is to visit China with Tess Karlinski.. a little behind today with one thing and another but always time for Tess.. This week Beijing part four and Marriage the old fashioned way with Mum making sure that you find someone suitable.. fascinating statistics and it seems that finding the right partner is as difficult there as anywhere.. but some really tough health statistics and the amount of sugar consumed in China #Recommended.

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  20. Interesting cultural ways of dealing with the 40:100 ratio There must be a lot of unmarried older women. If the Chinese consume so much sugar, it’s not surprising there is a high rate of diabetes. Some things the west introduced haven’t been so great. Enjoyed this.

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  21. Despite the current Trump lunacy here in the U.S., I am soooo grateful I was not born in China. With my fiery temperament and candor, I’d either be dead or in jail for . . . oh, so many reasons! The bride looks happy, though. What is that tree with the beautiful white blossoms? 💜

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  22. utterly depressing about sugar; what are we doing to ourselves? But then I read this article by an American doctor (don’t you just hate them) who told me cheese is the real killer and is addictive too, more than coffee. I decided he was a charlatan without more ado. The marriage bit is depressing too. Not a chance my parents, love them as I did, were involved in my choices and I’d hate to have the responsibility with my kids, who frankly would laugh at the notion. Does that makes us advanced or merely abdicating our responsibilities?

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  23. Fascinating. Indeed years of only wanting to have male children, only being allowed one child as policy have created problems . It must be difficult to try and find a partner for your child, but it depends on what the priorities are. Different way to see thing. Diabetes is higher in Asian populations (even without taking the diet into account, probably genetic) and they recommend lower BMI. Looking forward to more of your trip, Tess.

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  24. Really enjoying getting the inside view on China.

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  25. So interesting, Tess! Love the photo of the tree. 🙂

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