How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE


Xian: Part 2 –The Real Terracotta Warriors

 

Before we visited the Terracotta Warrior Factory, Sue asked our tour guide, Steve, if he recognized the rash she had on her ankles. In the past few days the eruption had changed from mild to a full-blown inflamed mess. It had spread like fire from her ankles half-way up her calves and shinbones. As well, her legs were swollen and she had a liquid pouch beneath the skin above her toes. We all checked our ankles and legs. All had a similar rash, but it was mild compared to Sue’s. Carolyn had none.

Steve, bless him, took her to a Pharmacy for a solution. None was given. Either this was a mystery or the pharmacist didn’t want to take any chances with a foreigner. Time wasted? I don’t think any of our group minded.

When the bus arrived at the Terracotta Warrior Museum we encountered hustlers offering wheelchair assistance. What? How old did we look? Sure we were all over 60 and younger than 75—hardly decrepit. I rolled my eyes at Sue, and skipped like a schoolgirl to prove my agility. Later when I thought of it, I hadn’t noticed anyone else in a wheelchair all afternoon.

Inside the Museum:  Horses and Chariot

 © All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

                        © All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

Cavalry Men

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

Lots of figurines and tourist merchandise on sale again. Hordes of people along the walk from the parking lot, to the museum, and to each of the three pits, which were housed in separate buildings. I scanned the crowds surrounding us and noticed people from all over the world. At one point we met university students from Alberta, Canada. We chatted but only for a second to exchange where we lived.

Standing Archer

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

                © All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

Standing Archer Plaque

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

                    © All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

My first view of the warriors took my breath away. They looked so real, as if they waited with eyes closed. No two faces were alike. This army had prevailed for two millennia, row upon row, facing the same direction, lines straight, prepared and intent to protect the tomb of their emperor. I expected they would be red but over time the color had leached out into the soil they were buried in.

© 2014 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

                              © 2014 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

 

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

 I was shocked to learn none of these warriors had been found whole. Think of all the reconstruction work. The mystery continues whether the compacted ground overhead might have been responsible or if the destruction was by calculated intent. As well, fire in some areas was also evident by the blackened portions of unearthed wood pieces.

Do watch this. It is fascinating and well worth your time. I stumbled onto this documentary after my trip.

I witnessed my first child’s tantrum. Between three and five, arms swinging, the boy hit his mother and screamed at the top of his lungs and wouldn’t stop. This was the only public demonstration of a disorderly youngster during our time in China.

Tired and overwhelmed, we met Steve at the allocated spot. He waited, dough-faced, on a bench in the shade. I wondered why he soldiered on. Might the reason have anything to do with employment or tour guide rules?

Steve’s tummy continued to give him trouble. On the way to dinner, the driver pulled over at a gas station. We hadn’t seen many, and it was weird to see one when one was needed. The parking was tight and next to impossible, but our driver backed into a spot with ease. I expected scrape, crash and let’s-get-the-hell-outta-here cringing!  Click here

Before Steve exited the bus, he warned us, “Do not follow me. If you have to go, hold it. You will not like this bathroom.”

We couldn’t help wondering what he meant. I’m glad we didn’t experience any of these.

Dinner:

  • Lotus root, sliced (delicious)
  • Cucumbers, sliced
  • Rice
  • Beef, cubed with onion and red peppers
  • Orange chicken
  • Beef with onion
  • Fish and celery
  • Cooked cabbage
  • Greens Eggplant
  • Vegetable soup
  • Sliced melon for dessert
  • Do-nut-type dessert (1-1-/2” diameter) with additional icing sugar for dipping

 © 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

                                                  © 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

                                                  © 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

Arrived at hotel at 7:20 p.m., the earliest night yet. At last time to read, relax, and sort our luggage again

~ * ~

Next on May 12th –  Shanghai: Part 1

© 2017 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

FYI: This is a re-blog of the best parts of my trip in 2014.

 


Shaolin: Kung Fu Training and Shaolin Temple

Image Courtesy of Sally Cronin

Already I was confused regarding the day. My iPad said Thursday but its calendar highlighted Wednesday. My laptop also showed Wednesday. Sheesh, different time zone. The reason for my disorientation was our itinerary had been flipped and I could not keep the changes straight.

This is where we slept the previous night. Pretty swanky hotel, but we saw no other guests.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

From the hotel, we drove to the Shaolin School of Kung Fu. Our guide, Lisa, told us the attendees were 95% boys with 5% girls. I saw no girls.

Lisa wore the same clothes as the day before: red track pants and a red quilted jacket. Too warm for the humid weather.The forecast for the day: 20 degrees.

© All Rights Reserved by Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© All Rights Reserved by Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© All Rights Reserved by Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© All Rights Reserved by Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

We sat inside for a thirty-minute-plus Kung Fu performance. The place was run down inside and out, needed paint and refurbishing. I took a couple of videos but deleted them because they were too blurry.

The little guy in white, the youngest but a rapidly advancing pupil, demonstrated clutching a bowl-shaped object to his midriff by muscle control. To prove authenticity, a pole inserted through a hole in the object (was it a bell?) allowed two young men to lift it shoulder length and carry the boy as he hung firmly attached, belly-up.

© All Rights Reserved by Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© All Rights Reserved by Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z4-s8TBB6dw  (4.49 min) A peak at Kung Fu training.

Quick Facts:

  • Shaolin Home of Shaolin School of Kung Fu
  • Established 495 A.D.
  • 10,000 students
  • Ages 3 to 18 (complete education here, equivalent to finishing high-school)
  • 95% boys / 5% girls
  • Half-day school / half-day Kung Fu training
  • This is a private school (parents pay for room, board, and tuition)
  • One month holiday in February during Chinese New Year
  • Parents can come to visit on weekends
  • Costs (10,000 Yuan) under $2,000 U.S. per year
  • Attending this school is good for finding a job later
  • Can open own Kung Fu school in other countries instead of finding a job
  • Famous personalities from this school: Bruce Lee and Jackie Chan

Pagoda Forest / Shaolin Temple

A short distance away we visited the Pagoda Forest. Rain drizzled as we walked around. Young girls giggled and stared, and begged to have their picture taken with the foreigners (‘the big noses’).

© All Rights Reserved by Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© All Rights Reserved by Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagoda_Forest_at_Shaolin_Temple

This is what the tombs look like. The size depended on the monk’s life achievement and the number of  financial contributors.

© All Rights Reserved by Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© All Rights Reserved by Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

Quick Facts: 

  • Graveyard with 248 tombs for important monks
  • Depending on life’s accomplishments = size of tomb
  • Depending on number of supporters (donations) = size of tomb
  • Tombs built during an eminent monk’s lifetime, not after death, and added to till he died

Some highlights at the Temple

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8. (The well is picture below)

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.  (This is the preserved well.)

Protectors of the Temple

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

An Altar

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

~ *~

Next on April 28:  Xian

© 2017 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

FYI: This is a re-blog of the best parts of my trip in 2014.

Xian: Day 8, Part 2 –The Real Terracotta Warriors

82 Comments

Before we visited the Terracotta Warrior Factory, Sue asked our tour guide, Steve, if he recognized the rash she had on her ankles. In the past few days the eruption had changed from mild to a full-blown inflamed mess. It had spread like fire from her ankles half-way up her calves and shinbones. As well, her legs were swollen and she had a liquid pouch beneath the skin above her toes. We all checked our ankles and legs. All had a similar rash, but it was mild compared to Sue’s. Carolyn had none.

Steve, bless him, took her to a Pharmacy for a solution. None was given. Either this was a mystery or the pharmacist didn’t want to take any chances with a foreigner. Time wasted? I don’t think any of our group minded.

When the bus arrived at the Terracotta Warrior Museum we encountered hustlers offering wheelchair assistance. What? How old did we look? Sure we were all over 60 and younger than 75—hardly decrepit. I rolled my eyes at Sue, and skipped like a schoolgirl to prove my agility. Later when I thought of it, I hadn’t noticed anyone else in a wheelchair all afternoon.

Inside the Museum:  Horses and Chariot

 © All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

Cavalry Men

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

Lots of figurines and tourist merchandise on sale again. Hordes of people along the walk from the parking lot, to the museum, and to each of the three pits, which were housed in separate buildings. I scanned the crowds surrounding us and noticed people from all over the world. At one point we met university students from Alberta, Canada. We chatted but only for a second to exchange where we lived.

Standing Archer

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

Standing Archer Plaque

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

My first view of the warriors took my breath away. They looked so real, as if they waited with eyes closed. No two faces were alike. This army had prevailed for two millennia, row upon row, facing the same direction, lines straight, prepared and intent to protect the tomb of their emperor. I expected they would be red but over time the color had leached out into the soil they were buried in.

© 2014 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 All Rights Reserved Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

 

© All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of RJ, a member of English 8.

 I was shocked to learn none of these warriors had been found whole. Think of all the reconstruction work. The mystery continues whether the compacted ground overhead might have been responsible or if the destruction was by calculated intent. As well, fire in some areas was also evident by the blackened portions of unearthed wood pieces.

Do watch this. It is fascinating and well worth your time. I stumbled onto this documentary after my trip.

I witnessed my first child’s tantrum. Between three and five, arms swinging, the boy hit his mother and screamed at the top of his lungs and wouldn’t stop. This was the only public demonstration of a disorderly youngster during our time in China.

Tired and overwhelmed, we met Steve at the allocated spot. He waited, dough-faced, on a bench in the shade. I wondered why he soldiered on. Might the reason have anything to do with employment or tour guide rules?

Steve’s tummy continued to give him trouble. On the way to dinner, the driver pulled over at a gas station. We hadn’t seen many, and it was weird to see one when one was needed. The parking was tight and next to impossible, but our driver backed into a spot with ease. I expected scrape, crash and let’s-get-the-hell-outta-here cringing!  Click here

Before Steve exited the bus he warned us, “Do not follow me. If you have to go, hold it. You will not like this bathroom.”

We couldn’t help wondering what he meant. I’m glad we didn’t experience any of these.

Dinner:

  • Lotus root, sliced
  • Cucumbers, sliced
  • Rice
  • Beef, cubed with onion and red peppers
  • Orange chicken
  • Beef with onion
  • Fish and celery
  • Cooked cabbage
  • Greens Eggplant
  • Vegetable soup
  • Sliced melon for dessert
  • Donut-type dessert (1-1-/2” diameter) with additional icing sugar for dipping

 © 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

© 2014 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

Arrived at hotel at 7:20 p.m., the earliest night yet. At last time to read, relax, and sort our luggage again

 

Next on September 26 –  Xian to Shanghai Day 9, Part 1

For more related posts, click on China tab at the top of the page

© 2014 All Right Reserved TAK

This gallery contains 15 photos


50 Comments

100-Word Challenge for Grown-Ups – Week #131

To join, check out Julia’s Place and  ‘What is 100WCGU?‘  This week’s prompt: when the night demons visit.

100wcgu-72

Wanderers

A wispy-haired woman stabbed wood into the yawning woodstove. Jason read at the kitchen table. The autumn wind rattled the windows and shook the dilapidated farmhouse.

“Louder, son.”

He paused and cleared his throat, licked his forefinger, and turned the page. The kerosene flame flickered and hurled giant silhouettes around them. “You can’t hide when the night demons visit.” He leaned closer to the meagre light.

She slammed the lid lifter and glared down at him. “Demons? What demons?” Insistent pounding silenced her. “Did you bolt the door?”

Eyes bulging, Jason shook his head.

“Let us in.”

“Who’s us?”

“Freddy and me.”

“But. You’re. Dead!”


63 Comments

Flash in the Pan – Figures

Microsoft Clip Art

Microsoft Clip Art

“What’s in the box Gramps?” Lucas bounced on the sofa beside him.

“Something special from when I was your age.” He patted the box and stared into the distance.

“Lemme see. Lemme see.”

“These GI Joe action figures were made popular 50 years ago this month.”

“Ew. You played with dolls?”

“You liked the Star Wars collectibles didn’t you?

“Yeah, but they weren’t huge like Barbies.”

“You don’t want these?”

“Sorry, I like Minecraft better.”

~ * ~

The Winter Quarter of Flash in the Pan is here. The theme: Boys and Their Toys. For the rules and how to join, click: http://mommasmoneymatters.com/flash-fiction/

The word limit for Figures is 75 words. I used all of them.