How the Cookie Crumbles

An irreverant view of life after SIXTY-FIVE


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Tying up Loose Ends – Homeward Bound

During summer in St. John’s, you can catch a tour bus for $5.00, which stops at all the sites for an hour each. Schedules are available at hotels. What a steal. The opportunity was lost on us as the season had closed.

Tired after our stroll on Duckworth Street, we trudged uphill all the way to the hotel. The drizzle followed us, fading in and out. One moment we snapped our umbrellas shut and open the next. Once we arrived in our room, nothing mattered more than putting my feet up and grabbing my book. I apologized to the novel for awarding it second place. Mary had other ideas. She’d heard about the sauna and prepared to unwind there instead.

The afternoon drew to a close. We had  time to kill before our last dinner with the tour group and decided to check out the atrium. A tall ladder took prominence in one area for some kind of maintenance in progress. The rest unfolded for our pleasure to amble through and explore. It was a large area.

All good things must end. Thoughts of going home struck us with a mixture of regret and relief. For dinner, we had pre-ordered Newfoundland Screech Glazed Salmon and heart of Romaine Caesar. The women dolled up, but the men dressed in casual attire. Our numbers had dwindled over the last few days from thirty-two to about twenty-four. Two servers and a Maître d’ attended us in a private room. Francis wore a suit and brought his wife. I was impressed the tour owner’s warm, down-home speech. Francis became sentimental. Can’t help but love the guy.

Sneaked a photo in art store at the Sheraton

Sneaked a photo in art store at the Sheraton

The next morning after a posh breakfast (this is the Sheraton after all), Mary wanted one last run downtown before Francis dropped us at the airport at eleven. No rain in sight. The sun smiled and the sky glowed pastel blue, a smear of clouds here and there. Yes. Believe it or not. I took this through the hotel window. Trees obscured the view of the ship in the harbor but not the clear horizon.

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Nervous as a cat, I prowled the room waiting for Mary. We had 20 minutes until transfer to the airport with Francis and a few others of our group. Seven minutes to spare, Mary arrived. We collected our bags and as soon as we hit the lobby, found everyone already on the bus, their bags already loaded.

Mary had checked us in for the flight the night before. The machine took our information but refused to spit out our luggage tags and boarding passes. No one around to help, I ran to grab an attendant some distance away though St. John’s airport isn’t huge. A desk person helped but we noticed too late she’d only printed boarding passes to Halifax and not transfers from Halifax to home. We soon sorted this out upon landing. The airport huge and obviously international, we walked for miles and miles as. Mary searched for a fish store but they had no fresh lobster. Stomachs rumbling, we checked out places to eat and shared a late lunch of salad and maybe mussels—I can’t recall— but still paid almost $50. For lunch.

* * *

Next up on November 4th – A Surprise

© 2016 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles. All Rights Reserved.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page

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Out and About in St. John’s

The previous night we spent at Sheraton Hotel Newfoundland, built on the site of Fort William and the most luxurious of the trip. Our first night had been spent at Glynmill Inn, a much older but quaint establishment. A handful of magnificent east coast art decorated the walls in our room, even in the bathroom. The bellman who delivered our bags told my sister she better take care. He guessed her bag at capacity weight, if not already over.

It’s our second last day and the morning greeted us with angry, driving rain. Boarding the bus, we were introduced to our new driver, Pete, who informed us he’s waiting to get his license to drive this tour bus. What a joker. Shawn had left for Gander the night before to return our original bus.

Peter used to work in a paper-mill until five years ago when it shut down. He started our dreary day with this joke:

Sam went to heaven and was startled by all the clocks on the walls. Some moved slowly and some not at all. That’s St. Theresa’s clock; she never told a lie. That’s Abraham Lincolns…

Hey, where’s Stephen Harper’s clock? It’s in God’s office—used as a ceiling fan.

Newman and Company

  • English Winery
  • 1669 ships travelled to Portugal to pick up wine in barrels, returned to refine
  • Attacked by pirates, escaped
  • Escaped during storm
  • Made way to St. John’s. Could not return to England
  • Excavated caves 20 feet in solid rock to store wine
  • In spring, loaded on ship
  • When began to bottle, found wine superior
  • 1670 to late 1880 went to Portugal, returned with wine, stored in caves several years
  • Returned again to Portugal
  • During WWII, munitions stored in caves
  • Wine caves sealed now
  • Newman Wine Vaults

This is Mile “O” of the Trans-Canada_Highway, where Canada begins!

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 I ran out in the pouring rain with a few other adventurous souls to take pictures of this mustard yellow building: Quidi Vidi Brewery. We were interesting in going inside, but it was closed. It would have been a treat to sample some of their famous brew. Not worth getting soaked to the skin but there you have it. I didn’t enjoy this day’s tour in the pelting rain. Lots of info given, but it came too fast and the photos were messy taken from the moving bus.

Terry Fox Monument

  • Moved to current location because people had trouble finding it
  • This is where he dipped his artificial foot into the Atlantic before he started

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St. John’s Quick Facts:

  • War Memorial Day in Newfoundland is July 1
  • Newfound dogs are mascots for War Memorial Days
  • The other Memorial Day is November 11th
  • Oldest wooden structure in St. Johns is Mallard Cottage, a restaurant attached to it
  • Penitentiary built 1859
  • 55,000 American troops stationed at Fort Pepperrell from WWII until the 1960s
  • Chimney Smoke Pots: If you see 6 – 8 on a roof, each leads to 6 – 8 open fireplaces

* * *

Next on October 14thSt. John’s, a University Town

© 2016 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles. All Rights Reserved.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page


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St. John’s Signal Hill

We finally arrived in St. John’s, the last leg of our tour. Boohoo. Home soon, but not till we see what is on offer. The only entrance to the harbor is through the The_Narrows,_St._Johns which are only 200 feet wide.

Signal Hill

Our bus chugged up the steep, intimidating hill. I thought we’d roll back any minute. What a surreal feeling! Not a good day for touring 400 feet above sea level. Walking was difficult as the paths, though paved from the parking lot to the Cabot Tower, are also vertical. What a spectacular view. The weather was blustery so the walking was not enjoyable. Other than the view and the inside of the Tower, there wasn’t much to photograph, except the view.

A puddle a defrosted glacier makes

                                                      The puddle a defrosted glacier makes

The name Signal Hill did not come from Marconi. When people started to settle here, the merchants had their own ships. They had a person on the hill watching the flag on the incoming ship. The lookout, then put up a twin flag for everyone to see and set off the cannon. Ships came off Cape Race, dropped a canister with news inside and were paid $5.00.

Cabot Tower

Inside the tower are Marconi exhibits and of course, a bustling gift shop. Who knew? We saw numerous and huge ships in the harbor below.

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Marconi

Marconi sent transmissions at predetermined times near Cabot Tower. The wireless system really worked, but people laughed at him. Even Thomas Edison scoffed at Marconi’s efforts. “It’s interesting, but I don’t think it will have any commercial value,” he said.

Marconi was responsible for saving 705 people on the Titanic (1,500 were lost). He signaled the Carpathia 584 kilometers south of Cape Race / 365 miles off the coast of Newfoundland.

Waterford

In Bowring_Park, a statue identical to the one in Pickadilly was shipped from England in memory of Sir Edgar Bowring’s granddaughter who drowned with her father.

Quick Facts about St. John’s

  • The Four Sisters of Temperance Street
  • A Canadian Legion Pub has a periscope on the roof from a wrecked ship
  • Pier 17 where Terry Fox put his foot in the water
  • Building new convention center capable of hosting anything and everything
  • Population about 110,000 in St. John’s
  • Huge university, add another 10,000 to 20,000

* * *

 Next on October 7th – Out and About in St. John’s

© 2016 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles. All Rights Reserved.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page


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Cape Spear Anyone? Anyone?

Finally, some excitement. Francis forgot to counts heads and the bus crept out of the parking spot from Cape Spear. The driver inched forward with caution as other tourist milled about around and in front of our bus. (Single) Angela from Germany came running up the hill. One worried husband tore down the aisle to the front of the bus. “One minute, Francis. My wife is missing.”

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You should have seen our tour guide’s face. Though he’s of a ruddy complexion, he turned the red of a sun-drenched tomato. Angela soon lumbered up the steps breathless, with a lopsided grin on her flushed face. This time, the bus driver piped in. “You thought we’d leave without you, eh?”

The worried husband pointed a finger with relief in his voice. ”There she is.” Thirty pairs of eyes turned to their left—no, more—some wore glasses. The missing woman hobbled up the steep grade waving to the bus. Wait for me. I’m coming. She had turned an ankle in her rush, but not enough for medical attention. As she made her way inside the bus, her husband wiggled a finger at her. Using a stern voice but unable to hide his amusement, he said, “Don’t you ever scare me like that again.” He burst out laughing as did she. The whole bus roared, even Francis.

The woman came this way but towards us

The woman came this way but towards us

Francis then entertained us with a story where he had been left behind in the Dominican Republic. He left the resort in a taxi at 6:00 a.m. wanting to tour in the Catalina Islands. Then he hopped on a bus, then a catamaran, and a paddle wheeler down to a monastery. He was the only English speaking person out of the 60 on the tour. He walked around, took pictures and decided to return to the bus. No bus. Everyone—gone. He walked out to the highway. Waited and waited. Along came a yellow bus with only one seat at the back. Half-asleep, the guy in the next seat pointed to his armband. Francis had a blue one; his seatmate a pink one.

The good Samaritan called to the driver, who figured out Francis was on the wrong bus. He pulled over on the highway and made him get off.

A car came along with some guys inside. “Want help? Want help?”

No, he wasn’t getting into the car but decided to walk. The gist is he came across security guards who could not speak English. A guy came along on a bike. “Trouble, trouble,” he said in English.

Francis saw a car, walked up to the driver and asked, “Where am I?” The guy shook his head.

A small voice in the back asked in good English, “Can I help you, sir?”

Francis could have hugged him. “How far to the resort?

“Three and a half hours.”

“How much to get back to the resort?”

“$90.00 U.S.D.

He finally arrived by 11:00 p.m. All the buses had returned at 5:00 p.m. What a state his wife was in! This story proves how important counting your tour passengers is. After his experience, he always remembered that. Except, this time.

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Cape Spear Quick Facts:

  • Glacier once covered this area (see all the loose boulders)
  • 1836, first lighthouse at Cape Spear
  • East coast trail (hikers come from St. John’s, from everywhere)
  • In summer, tour guides have to force people into bus (stop the whale watching)
  • Bunkers from WWII
  • Most easterly point of North America

* * *

Next on September 30 – Signal Hill

© 2016 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles. All Rights Reserved.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page


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More Brigus and Petty Harbour

The weather had become humid and heavy with rain since before lunch.

Francis said we were on our own for supper, but I recalled the plans had been changed because we wouldn’t see whales and puffins per our itinerary. This last, added tour was too late in the season. An e-mail notice had mentioned we’d be treated to dinner instead. I asked Mary to dig up the email on her iPad. As we read it, Francis retracted his announcement. Another free meal. Yay.

Before we leave the little town of Brigus, I have a couple more interesting tidbits. We walked down the road to Brigus Tunnel. Granddaddy Abram Bartlett (to Captain Bob) had this tunnel built to avoid a busy, crowded harbor. This accommodated his trips to Labrador for summer fishing and to offload his catch without crowding when he returned.

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Once we walked through the tunnel, this is what awaited where Abram unloaded his ship.:

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On our way back to the bus, we came upon these yellow flowers. According to Norm, a member of our party, they are from the snapdragon family: called butter and eggs. The more I looked at them, the more the name fit.

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Once on the bus, Francis popped in a DVD about the resettlement from Paradise Bay. The government at work again. Sigh.

http://www.heritage.nf.ca/articles/politics/resettlement-program.php

Return to Paradise for the Pomeroy Family:

Petty Harbour:

I took a gazillion photos. It’s a small world as they say. We met some people from Sarnia vacationing in Petty Harbour in a house off the harbor. Two couples in our group were also from the same city and soon all ended up chatting together.

It’s a pretty place, but we didn’t see any fish arriving nor fisherman unloading them.

Storage containers each hold 2,000 pounds of cod.They are about a yard square and so well insulated, our guide bought an old one, cut a door in it, put on a peaked roof, and his dog is comfy all winter.

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Petty Harbour Quick Facts:

  • Images of Petty Harbour
  • Gordon Pinsent made many movies here
  • Orca the Killer Whale movie made here
  • Alan Doyle (singer, actor) was in movie in his hometown Petty Harbour
  • Houses along Petty Harbour Road are more upscale, modern, vinyl-covered
  • Few houses in wood
  • Ziplining: See here and here popular (off the cliffs, Petty Harbour Road)
  • Fastest growing area
  • Building a city within a city: Costco, huge theatre
  • Areas set aside for seniors’ centers and industrial areas
  • All dairy farms around here
  • Grow cattle corn because too expensive to bring in feed
  • No railway to supplement the hay
  • Sign on the way to St. John’s: Irish Loop Drive (because it reminded them of home)
  • Reminds you why the Irish settled on the coast = looked so much like home)
  • ABC = Anyone but Conservatives (last ruling government)

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* * *

On the Lighter Side:

Mary felt her husband’s hands wander over her body. “Oh, John. I didn’t know you were feeling so romantic.”

“Go to sleep, Mary. I was looking for the remote.”

* * *

Next time: Cape Spear and Signal Hill

© 2016 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page

 


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Lunch and a Visit to Brigus

Lunch awaited at Skipper Ben’s Restaurant in Cupids, which is also a bed and breakfast for only a couple people at a time. Francis says he’d stayed overnight in the past. The food had been pre-ordered and arrived hot soon after we were seated. How the cook managed, I cannot imagine. The kitchen was teeny-tiny. I like a large island or lots of counter space to work on, neither of which were evident. If I hadn’t checked out the washrooms, I wouldn’t have seen the work space.

We entered through the cute side door with a plaque. The front of the building was on the other side.

Inside there were just enough tables to accommodate our reduced group of 22. Three people left on Day 7 and 6 on Day 8).

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Mary and I had been too busy talking and I forgot to take pictures of the food. We both ordered fish cakes and vegetables but didn’t taste the cod for the mashed potatoes that glued the cakes together. A fellow across from me, smiled from ear to ear, smacked his lips and said in a loud voice, “You can’t even taste any potato in these fish cakes.” I wonder if he was being facetious.

Dessert: a crepe wrapped around fruit with  phony whipped cream. I’m glad I don’t take to sweets.

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The Town of Brigus

  • Best blueberry pies anywhere
  • A popular tourist spot now
  • Quiet, quaint, colorful, and well-kept

Captain Bob Bartlett was raised in Brigus, enjoyed fishing, sealing and exploring. During one of his expeditions, his ship, the Karluk became stuck in the ice. When he realized his ship had to be given up, he played all his classical records one by one and threw each into the sea. The last one he played was the Funeral March.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63B2y5RxbNs (a song about his adventures – Enjoy)

He traveled 700 miles to Alaska by sledge, obtained another ship, returned in five months and saved his crew. He lost not one man.

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The Bartlett family lived in Hawthorne Cottage between 1885 and 1946. Due to his many expeditions, and other as a child, I can’t imagine how much time he spent living in this house.

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Named for the hawthorn trees planted around the house.

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John Leamon Museum (Could not find much information about it.)

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Brigus Seafaring Families Plaque:

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Some of the delightful street names in Brigus:

Irishtown Road South Street Conception Bay Highway
Magistrate’s Hill Beaver Road Station Road
Jane’s Hill Forge Road Quigley Bay
Barrach’s Road Chapel Lane Spacklin Lane
Church Hill Station Line Keating Road
Vindicator Lane School Street Ridge Road
Water Street Blueberry Place The Old Road

* * *

On the Lighter Side:

A guy comes into a bar and orders three beers, goes to a table, and drinks them one after another. One night, he orders only two and the bartender asks if one of his brothers died.

“Oh, no. I gave up drinking.”

* * *

Next on July 1st – More Brigus and Petty Harbor

© 2016 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page


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The First English Settlement and Oil

The day began with a disappointing fog, thick as porridge and I worried about the drive. On the bright side, the road wasn’t as winding as the previous day, but visibility wasn’t good. Soon, a fine drizzle drifted in. Mary and I weren’t in the front seat anymore, but back a couple seats. Yay.

The bus stopped in Whitbourne at Robyn’s Donut Shop for hot coffee and a stretch. It’s similar to Timmy’s in Ontario, but this establishment was takeout only. Two interesting travelers were pushing off as we exited. I wanted to ask about their biking adventures but didn’t want to run after them, nor come across as a stalker.

First English settlement

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In 1610 John Guy arrived from England with 39 men and meager supplies. They wintered in Cupids Cove (Plantation) and began building houses. The area was rocky and covered with mulberry, pine, spruce and fir trees. He returned to England the following year and came back with 16 women. Building started in earnest and more settlers followed. He attempted to establish trade with the Beothuks. In 1613 he left again never to return but became a Member of Parliament in his native land.

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We moved on to Cupids Legacy Centre, a building chock full of old collections, which took me down memory lane. Here’s a look inside and out.

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Some displays inside Legacy Centre:

Offshore Oil Quick Facts:

  • Hibernia 315 km from St. John’s
  • 200 miles offshore
  • 240 feet high / 224 meters
  • 33 meters higher than Calgary
  • Pumping 120,000 barrels a day
  • Cost $6 Billion
  • 1985 accord signed. Government wanted full control.
  • Why should Newfoundland be treated any different from Alberta?
  • Argued until PM Mulroney got in. Gulf oil bowed out.
  • Most oil fields have around a 20-year lifespan
  • Latest News June 17, 2016

Hebron Facts:

  • Hebron Project
  • Drilling begun 1981
  • 4 major fields: ExonMobil, Suncor, Statoil, Nalcor
  • Coming in a year or so (after 2015)
  • Contains 1.2 billion barrels of oil
  • Good for 20 years or more
  • Negotiated better deals than Alberta
  • Province gets 1%
  • After all costs paid, Newfoundland gets super royalty over the 30% they usually get
  • Funds go into general coffers
  • Hope a fund is set up for renewable resources

~ * ~

On the Lighter Side:

A young couple who tried to conceive met their old parish priest while walking down the street.

“How’s the family?”

“None. Can’t”

“I’m on my way to Rome. I’ll light a candle for you.”

Five years later, Mary was heavily pregnant when she met the priest again.

“I see it’s all working out for you.”

“Don’t talk, Father. Shortly after you said you were going to Rome and would light a candle, I had twins. After, I had another one. Now again.

“Good. Good. By the way, where is John?”

“He’s gone to Rome to blow out the candle.”

* * *

© 2016 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page


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Bonavista

 

Mary and I won the daily draw for the front seat kitty-corner from the driver. We face huge front windows—a panoramic view—three steps above Shawn, our driver. On our way to Bonavista, the road had wide curves. He slowed, careful not to tip the bus. I hoped tilting too far wasn’t possible.

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I found the ride awfully bumpy for a one-year-old modern bus. Something wrong with the suspension, I wondered? “Mamma,” I said when we hit a particular curve. Said is a weak description. I believe I yelped or screeched loud enough for the driver and our tour guide across the aisle to hear. Shawn’s eyes caught mine in the rearview mirror, a wicked grin on his face. “These aren’t government roads,” he said.

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I hadn’t noticed there were no signs anywhere warning of sharp turns or anything else.

Bonavista Quick Facts:

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  • Rivals St. John’s in early days of fishery
  • Tourism is big here
  • Dungeon Provincial Park is a phenomena
  • Small puffin colony established at the top of the cliffs
  • Lots of cemeteries on both sides of the road
  • Cemeteries: Anglican (large one); Pentecostal, United, Jehovah’s Witness, Salvation Army, Seventh Day Adventist, more and some new ones
  • Nine windmills produce enough energy for 600 houses

A fishing vessel, Ryan’s Commander, ran into a storm in 2004 after dropping off fish. Empty, it capsized. Four crew were saved; two lost their lives. A helicopter had to release one survivor to the ocean because he would have smashed into the cliff. This was also at night. The pilot thought he saw a glimmer. One of the survivors was on the cliff—the glimmer was his watch—saved him.

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At Dungeon Provincial Park, we stopped for photo opportunities.

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What you want to know about puffins:

  • Puffins: Images
  • Puffins can dive 200 feet to get a capelin
  • Their nest has two chambers, one for the chick, the other as the lavatory
  • They mate for life
  • Live for 20 year and do not come on shore
  • Come to land to nest in June when capelins come
  • Leave chicks on the cliff
  • Literally throw the chicks into the water at night. Use moon as guidance system.
  • They cannot lift off land
  • 500 young birds landed on pavement
  • Puffin Patrol has saved 3,000 – 4,000 puffins
  • No longer throw puffins in air because black seagulls wait and attack them
  • Saved, recorded, and thrown into the water instead

The cod au gratin was dry at lunch, a little better in the center. My disappointment overpowered anything positive. Wow. The salad was generous with raspberry dressing on the side. A large slice of fresh white bread and butter accompanied the lunch. The coffee was delicious and the service great!

After lunch, the Interpretation Center (a self-guided tour) was opened just for our tour group.

A legendary appetite:

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Ryan Premises National Historic Site of Canada: only the dining room had furniture and crystal glasses on shelves. Almost every room had a fireplace. It was built in 1869 and has shifted at least a couple inches on the side = cracked walls and sagging stuck doors. I must learn to check pictures have turned out before assuming the click took when I snapped a picture. I am missing all the pictures taken in this house.

While we waited for the group to congregate at the bus afterwards by mid-afternoon, Shawn said the temperature had soared to 26 degrees Celsius. He received a phone call shortly afterwards and crossed the road. A car stopped; he handed a package to a young lady passenger. On his heels beside the sidewalk, they had an animated conversation for several minutes. I paid no attention to the driver. Oh, the wonders of the 21st century.

We passed a church with a wedding in progress, but the bride and groom were not in sight.

Headed to the hotel, Francis popped a Daniel O’Donald music DVD for our ride back. By 4:30, we were about a half-hour from the hotel but stopped at an Ultramar Gas station for drinks and whatnot.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_KmYHaf58Q

Mary and I had supper at the hotel dining room with Ann, who was traveling alone with our tour. She’s so reedy, a light breeze might blow her over. Our eyes bulged when she ordered a seafood platter: 8 mussels, shrimps, crab, and rice. She also enjoyed a large glass of red wine.

Mary chose linguini with vegetables, but I had little appetite and chose Caesar salad with chicken. I can’t believe the truckload of croutons in this dish.

* * *

On the lighter side:

A guy calls the hospital to asked about Sammy Jones, a patient in Room 302. “Sure, connect me to the Nurses’ Station.”

“He’s eaten three meals today, and doing fine. If he keeps improving, he will be discharged Wednesday. Are you family?”

“No, not family. I’m a friend—no, I’m Sammy Jones in 302. Nobody tells me anything!”

* * *

Next on June 17th – The First English Settlement

© 2015 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page


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Trinity and Port Union

I smacked the alarm at what appeared to be 7:14 a.m. What? Guess no breakfast, I thought. Lucky for us, it was only 5:15. The alarm hadn’t been properly set. Mary groaned, intent on staying in bed a while. I took my time getting ready: a treat not to rush my shower or share the vanity, while I painted my face awake.  The morning began with an upset tummy, but with time for breakfast, I wasn’t going to miss it.

Newfoundland Facts:

We stopped at Mirabella Artisan Gift Shop mid afternoon. The shop put on coffee just for our tour group or so we heard. Mary bought me one while I joined the line to the powder room. The washroom had a shower and if you wished to use it, you had to register with the desk. Really? The room was larger than required for a toilet, sink, wastebasket and baby change table. I wonder if it had been a bedroom at one time. Why hadn’t I asked? I forget what Mary purchased or did she? She used to be an avid shopper but has toned down the habit in the last couple years.

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 Surprise, surprise. Though I am never interested in ‘more stuff’ other than books, an adorable sterling silver ring caught my eye. The extra 30% off special didn’t hurt either—better than costume but at a lower price than gold.

TRINITY BAY Quick Facts:

  • Trinity surrounded by the bay
  • Anglican church built by the merchants
  • Catholic Church never had electricity. They couldn’t afford it (too few Catholics).
  • First Court
  • Stocks and whipping post
  • First smallpox vaccine introduced here
  • Strict building code: must be all wood
  • Can only use 5-inch clapboard in downtown area
  • Have a Heritage Committee
  • Center for Tourist Attraction: actors re-enact people of the times 150 years ago (merchants interacting with farmers and other everyday life interactions)

Mussel Quick Facts:

  • Mussels main food of star fish
  • Wraps arms around mussel till it opens its shell
  • Mouth is where stomach is
  • Insert stomach where mussel is to consume
  • Mussels can’t swim
  • Barrels across lake in rows attached with rope
  • Rope lengths dropped at intervals for mussels to attach (they like to cling)
  • When full, fishermen shuck them off the rope
  • Drop rope into water again till more mussels attach
  • Big market for them now
  • Shipping to Germany

(Rope lengths dropped at intervals for mussels to attach)

PORT UNION Quick Facts:

* * *

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE:

Three guys go to the washroom. The first guy finished announces aloud, “I’m from Saskatchewan. We all wash our hands after using the urinal.

The second guy finishes and announces he’s from Quebec. We all scrub our hands afterwards and he proceeded to scrub.

The third guy announces, “I’m from Newfoundland and my mother taught us not to p*** on our hands.

* * *

Next on June 10th – Bonavista

© 2015 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles. All Rights Reserved.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page


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Gander

Drizzle again on the agenda, we bused for about an hour-and-a-half to the sounds of an easy-listening CD. In Gander, I spotted a child on the sidewalk with a white and brown Shetland pony. A rope around the pony’s neck, the child turned round and round, allowing the pony to run in a circle. Both were cute. I’ve never before seen a pony this tiny.

At Gander Airport, Francis regaled us with stories while we crowded around. On our way to the upper level, we stopped at a framed collage of stars who have passed through over the years.

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The view from the upper level provided a full, though distant view of this famous mural.

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In 1985, soldiers returning home for Christmas from Afghanistan crashed in Gander. The deadliest crash since WWII, 253 lives were lost.

On September 11, 2001, 39 planes landed in Gander (Operation Yellow Ribbon). Passengers were not allowed off the planes for 13 hours, information about the New York tragedy withheld until they deplaned. An American journalist, Jim DeFede, contacted and interviewed about 180 people from those flights and published a book.  (The Day the World Came to Town).

  • The population of Gander 10,000
  • 6,600 (passengers, pilots and crews)
  • Lewisporte took 800 passengers
  • Mayor of Gander talked with all the passengers
  • Walmart, Canadian Tire, drug stores—every store—supplied whatever was needed at no cost
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gJskIhGbDq4
  • All toiletries / everything gone from all shelves
  • 87-year-old woman needed underwear, clerk suggested thongs
  • Hundreds of thousands of meals prepared
  • Passengers organized together with their own group
  • Returning from Lewisporte to Gander and home, one Nigerian missing. Gone fishing with ‘the boys.’ Comes back every year
  • Shirley Brooks-Jones collected money from the passengers on her flight home
  • Set up a scholarship fund for the school where passengers had been housed and fed
  • Fund is 1.3 million dollars
  • Took out $850,000 life insurance policy in the event of her death to fund it

Gander Quick Facts

  • The Gander Airport mural (72 feet long) embodies the history of air travel.
  • No aircraft illustration were allowed to be used in the work
  • Opened in 1959 by Queen Elizabeth
  • Talk of a new airport, but this one is still busy
  • When planes fogged in in St. John’s, they land in Gander
  • You can at least drive 4-1/2 drive to St. John’s if need be
  • Was no direct flight to Europe from Gander. Now there is.
  • Had to go to Toronto first instead
  • Population over 11,000
  • Cubans defected to Canada, using Gander as jumping off point to Florida, to join their families

Close off the parking lot to airport, we spied an Irving gas station. Needing to replenish our spirits, Mary ran ahead so we wouldn’t hold up the bus but returned immediately because they didn’t carry anything stronger than coffee.

On the way to the hotel we passed a golf course, which is split, half on one side and half on the other. Players use golf carts underneath the highway to cross over. Terra Nova Park was on our agenda, but it was not mentioned and we did not stop.

Our room had a balcony we would not have the opportunity to use. The dining room in the restaurant had extra low lighting. When we paid for our meals, the cashier had no change for the couple before us and then not for us either. Each time she wandered off and was gone an unusual length of time.

By ten, I was a goner. I plugged in electronics to recharge overnight and slept like the dead until the alarm went off.

* * *

On The Light Side:

An 85-year-old man, in a red Ferrari, was stopped by a policeman who had ten minutes left in his shift. “Give me a good reason why you were speeding.”

“About 20 years ago, my wife ran off with a cop. I thought you were him.”

The cop let him go.

Next on June 3rd – Trinity and Port Union

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