How the Cookie Crumbles

Life and scribbles on the far side of SIXTY-FIVE


Shanghai, Part 4 – Silk Workshop

I enjoyed another lumberjack’s breakfast. Afterward, we were treated to yet another factory tour. This one was about silk and the most enjoyable so far. Though impressed, I had no plans to shop or spend  as I didn’t need anything. I changed my mind when I examined the magnificent comforters, pillows, and other bedding. I’m sorry now I purchased only one silk pillow and a light density silk comforter. I’m puzzled I carried less money than usual when I needed it. My friend, Sue, was flush and I borrowed the difference I needed. I also picked my wallet clean down to the lint hidden there. (Yuan and Canadian money, totaling about $150 CAD). Who knew? The price was more than reasonable. Checking prices on the internet since then, I believe I did well. I’d been planning to buy new pillows in the spring anyway never dreaming I might bring home a silk one from China.

Business was brisk. No previous factory tour had ignited this much interest. One tour group at a time was welcomed in a separate room from the sales area. Once money changed hands, the purchased goods were bundled in a compact cloth and zippered bag with handles. These were black-marked with the buyer’s name. deposited on the floor of the entry room and covered half the floor space. You picked out your parcel upon departure.

Some advantages of silk fiber bedding:

  • Silk bedding is better than down
  • Half the weight of down
  • Bedbugs prefer down, not silk
  • Dust mites don’t like it
  • Mildew resistant
  • Strongest natural fiber
  • Keeps its shape / doesn’t clump
  • Fire resistant
  • hypoallergenic
  • You won’t sweat on it
  • It forms to your shape / stays springy
  • Lasts for years with proper care

Silk and Comforter Making:

The Life of a silkworm:

Lunch was at (Haioufang) The Seagull Palace Restaurant. Our group arrived too early. Seated at a table. we had to wait for the food. When it arrived, it was at once and the restaurant filled up and was soon packed.

Lunch:

Drinks as always: one glass of water, coke, sprite, or beer.

Appetizers:

  • Sausage slices (not sure about meat source)
  • Tomato slices
  • Spicy edamame beans
  • Something fish dish
  • Cubed cucumbers and sliced lotus root (crunchy, mild flavor and enjoyable)

Main:

  • Tea
  • Eggplant
  • Egg drop soup
  • Rice with eggs, beef
  • Spring rolls
  • Carrots, onions, and potatoes (stew?)
  • Panko breaded mild white fish
  • Fried and breaded lotus root
  • Cubed chicken
  • Potato and pineapple in sweet tomato sauce
  • Salad
  • French Fries
  • Watermelon slices for dessert

~ * ~

Chinese Saying:
Lazy child who lives at home and lives off his parents instead of working 
is called, 'China Little Emperor.'

~ * ~

Next On June 22, Shanghai, Part 5 – Shopping on Nanjing Road and Stories

© 2017 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles

FYI: This is a re-blog of the best parts of my trip in 2014.

~ *~

I am currently on an unplanned sabbatical. Please bear with me. Hope to return soon. 
Thank you for reading and for your kind and continued support.
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Good-bye Labrador

Few photo opportunities for this post. More next time.

Wake-up call had been arranged for 7:30 a.m. We woke fifteen minutes before the phone rang, but it was still a scramble. Our luggage  was outside our door as we made our way foir breakfast by 8:00 a.m.

One of the overstuffed pillows on the beds would have still fit in my suitcase. Mary must have packed her entire closet ‘just in case.’ She had made use of the expansion zipper and with so much jampacked into her luggage, couldn’t find anything whenever she changed her mind and dug for something else.

Our tour group had the small restaurant to ourselves. The buffet breakfast offered regular porridge, numerous types of dry cereal, orange juice, and milk. The usual hot pans awaited: pancakes, scrambled eggs, bacon, and sausages, lots of toasted whole wheat bread. Orange slices and a discreet bowl of prunes completed the ensemble. Assorted packets of jam were at each table.

Francis reminded us to pickup the boxed lunches on the way out to the bus. It was impossible to miss them as they covered the whole reception desk where everyone had to drop off their room keys. Our lunches tucked into the overheads, we started out again in the grey drizzle and fog. I had forgotten we were in Labrador.

https://youtu.be/X5ZRyWGRVqY   (WP says this is invalid address)

Credit  oldirishladdie

Francis read a letter he’d found on the internet by a guy wanting to renew his passport.

The Newfoundlander, who had been a Canadian since 1949 had done so successfully several times before. He had served 30 years in the army, received Canadian pension etc. This, of course, entailed all the beauracracy anyone has ever experienced in a lifetime.

One of the questions asked his address. He wondered why, in his letter, he had to supply it since the forms had been addressed to his correct address. See where this is going? On and on the silly questions continued.

We laughed so hard, Francis and the driver included, we ended up in Quebec because we’d missed the correct exit to the ferry. Easy to do, you see, since our hotel wasn’t that deep into Labrador and the small strip which was Quebec could not be avoided between Newfoundland and Labrador. Though we had to use a few minutes to find a suitable area to reverse direction, we still had plenty of time before boarding.

IMG_1578

Shaun parked, shut off the engine. We had time to wait. Novels, iPods, iPods and cells were pulled out. Although the bus has WiFi, no one had been able to access it. Internet at last night’s hotel has been the easiest and most user-friendly so far.

Power to Labrador:

  • Labrador Island Link
  • Cable laid 35 km long: 2 for power, 1 for backup
  • Drilled off 350 meters.
  • 20 meters down to ocean floor
  • 600,000 tons of gravel to protect the wire from passing ships etc. to a depth of a meter and a half.

Giggle for a Friday

Two guys go into a new bar with lots of mirrors looked around for service.

“Sit down, Paddy. They’re coming over here.”

Next on March 4th – Back to NewFoundland

© 2015 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles. All Rights Reserved.

For more related posts, click on Newfoundland / Labrador tab at the top of the page


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#BlogBattle Week 49 – Prompt: Lollipops

Join us at http://rachaelritchey.com/blogbattle/

Genre: Drama

lollipop-356401_960_720 Pixabay

This is a type of Lollipop

Change

Nothing had changed in ten years. Liz hadn’t cared he wasn’t a romantic when they married. She’d accepted it. Why did it matter now? Was the sound of the clock ticking louder and louder towards her thirty-fifth birthday putting her on edge? Possible, but not probable. Her birthday was three months away. She yearned for something, something to change. Did the why matter? Sam was a good man. Eyes wide open, she’d married him, hadn’t she? Put aside yearnings and whimsy for married life.

Lost in thought, she started when Max the family poodle nudged her hard enough to knock her over. She landed bent over the kitchen counter. “Hi you—oh!” Liz squinted at the wall clock surprised at the time. “Thanks, boy. Better hurry and clean up.” She patted his woolly, apricot head. “Don’t want a nickname like painted lady and scare the other parents, do I?”

Before rushing out, she shut the door to the studio at the back of the old house. A warm glow filled her, as it did each time she admired the huge window Sam had insisted she have. No, he might not be romantic, so what silly goose? Still, Liz craved something. She didn’t understand what.

Her teeth chattered. The temperature must have dipped since early morning. Hands buried in yellow wool gloves, she drew her hat lower and clutched the white quilted coat at the throat. A throng of other parents at the corner stamped feet and circled round each other like piranhas in a fish tank. She laughed aloud at the thought hustling to the bus stop stomping as well. At the sound of crunching snow, several of the waiting looked up, waved or nodded. The shake and rattle of the school bus caught their attention. They turned as one. No one noticed Liz wave. The changing gears grated, whined, and stopped. The door screeched opened. Six-year-old Cat lumbered down the stairs first as always, wobbling past the throng of parents into her mother’s arms. “What a sight you are, darling.” Hat askew, blonde bangs and hair messy as a haystack, the girl’s face red from the overheated vehicle showed no concern. Her eyes glowed, a smile stretched across her face, missing teeth yawning.

“Mommy, Mommy. Wait till I show you my picture from school. My friend Nathan—he’s a artist like me—made a wonderful picture with me. My teacher wanted to hang it in class, but I said no.” Liz zipped her daughter’s snowsuit and wound the scarf round and round her head.

“I want to know all about your valentine’s party too, but not now.”

“Hey, I can’t talk.” Cat pushed the wrapping beneath her chin.

“Darling, it’s too cold to talk. Tell me at home. Let’s hurry. Mommy’s freezing. Aren’t you?” Liz caught her daughter’s hand. “Let’s run. Bet you can’t beat me.” Cat yanked her hand from her mother’s grasp and tottered forward like a miniature Michelin man. Liz stomped in place holding back.

At the bottom of their front steps, Liz swung the backpack over an arm, grabbed Cat beneath the arms from behind, and frog-marched them to the door. Inside Cat unwound, unzipped, tugged and wrenched, sweating like a lumberjack. “Darling, you’re hot.” Liz dropped to her knees, seized the bottom of her boots and heaved off the one-piece snowsuit.

Without missing a beat, the girl dumped the contents of her backpack on the floor. Wrapped chocolate kisses, a box of Reeses Pieces, and loose valentines scattered all over the floor. Hands shaking, a look of reverence on her flushed face, Cat unfolded a white sheet of paper, studied it for a couple beats, and nodded. She stood as if in a trance offering the gift to her mother.

Biting her tongue and blinking back tears Liz knew that look, understood the satisfaction and amazement her daughter was experiencing. Her heart swelled all the way to her throat. “Let’s see. Ooh.” She swallowed hard to push it back. “Wait till Daddy sees this. Your attention to detail is astonishing.”

“So, you like it, Mommy? Happy Valentine’s Day.” Cat drew invisible lines on the ceramic hallway tile with a stockinged toe, hands clasped behind her back.

Liz sank to her knees, clasping the girl as tight as she dared. “This is the best Valentine’s gift ever. Thank you. Come. Let’s make a special supper tonight to celebrate.”

“I’ll set the table. Want the dishes from the china cabinet?”

“Good idea. Wait. l’ll take them out for you. Your favourite tonight, roast chicken.”

Cat clapped her hands, stopped and tore down the hall.  “I have to go to the bathroom.”

Liz chuckled. “Don’t forget to wash your hands.” I’ll open a bottle of wine. It’s Valentine’s after all.

* * *

An hour and a half later, the doorbell chimed. Mother and daughter stared at each other. “Who can that be?” Cat turned to the door. “No, you don’t young lady. I’ll get it.” Shoulders back, Liz snatched open the door. Her jaw dropped.

“Are you Liz Wilson?”

She nodded if you could call it that. The deliveryman handed her a bouquet of yellow flowers, spun around, and disappeared down the drive.

“Mom, you’re letting in the cold. What is it?” Cat lingered down the hall knotting fingers together.

With gargantuan effort, Liz unglued her feet from the floor and closed the door. “Flowers.”

“They’re pretty. Who from?” The girl tiptoed within reach of her mother, extended a finger.

“Don’t know.” She held the cellophane wrapped bouquet away from her body, eyes feasting on them. Yellow. My favorite color.

“Open them.”

“What?”

“Doesn’t it say who they’re from? My teacher got flowers today. There was a card.”

“Oh. Yes. There is.”

A key in the door announced Sam’s arrival. He grinned. “They’re Lollipops. Like ‘em? Cat, these candy ones are for you.” His daughter squealed.

Blinded by tears, Liz grabbed Sam’s tie and pulled, crushing the flowers between them.

The End

© 2015 Tess @ How the Cookie Crumbles.

Image from Pixabay: No attribution required.


102 Comments

Shanghai: Day 11, Part 4 – Silk Workshop

After I enjoyed another lumberjack’s breakfast, we were treated to yet another factory tour. This one was about silk and the most enjoyable so far. I was impressed. I’d had no plans to shop or spend money because I didn’t need anything. My thinking changed when I surveyed the magnificent comforters, pillows and other bedding. I’m sorry now I purchased only one silk fibre pillow and a light comforter. Why I took more money than I usually carried around I can’t begin to understand. I picked my wallet clean down to the lint to pay for my bounty (Yuan and Canadian money, totaling about $150 CAD). Who knew? The price was more than reasonable. I’ve checked prices on the internet since then and I believe we did well. I’d been planning to buy new pillows in the spring anyway, never dreaming I might bring home a silk one from China.

Business was brisk. No other factory tour had ignited this much interest so far. When we arrived, in a separate room from the sales area, packages covered half the floor space. A departing group searched through to find their purchases. Once money changed hands, the goods were bundled into a compact cloth and zippered bag with handles, and the buyer’s name affixed. You didn’t see your parcel until departure.

Some advantages of silk fiber bedding:

  • Silk bedding is better than down
  • Half the weight of down
  • Bedbugs prefer down, not silk
  • Dust mites don’t like it
  • Mildew resistant
  • Strongest natural fibre
  • Keeps its shape / doesn’t clump
  • Fire resistant
  • hypoallergenic
  • You won’t sweat on it
  • It forms to your shape / stays springy
  • Lasts for years with proper care

Silk and Comforter Making:

The Life of a silk worm:

Lunch was at (Haioufang) The Seagull Palace Restaurant. Our group arrived too early. We were given a table and had to wait for the food. As more new customers arrived, our food came and the place was soon packed.

LUNCH:

Drinks as always: one glass water, coke, sprite, or beer.

Appetizers:

  • Sausage slices (not sure about meat source)
  • Tomato slices
  • Spicy edamame beans
  • Something fish dish
  • Cubed cucumbers and sliced lotus root (crunchy, mild flavor and enjoyable)

Main:

  • Tea
  • Eggplant
  • Egg drop soup
  • Rice with eggs, beef
  • Spring rolls
  • Carrots, onions and potatoes (stew?)
  • Panko breaded mild white fish
  • Fried and breaded lotus root
  • Cubed chicken
  • Potato and pineapple in sweet tomato sauce
  • Salad
  • French Fries
  • Watermelon slices for dessert

~ * ~

Chinese Saying:

Lazy child who lives at home and lives off his parents instead of working is called, ‘China Little Emperor.’

~ * ~

Next On November 7th, Shanghai, Day 11, Part 5 – Shopping on Nanjing Road and Stories

For more related posts, click on China tab at the top of the page

© 2014 All Right Reserved TAK


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100-Word Challenge for Grown-ups – Week #132

To join, check out http://jfb57.wordpress.com  and  ‘What is 100WCGU?‘  This week’s prompt: Emerald. 100-word limit.

100wcgu-72

UPS

A jarring gong shattered the silence. Iris slapped her book on the end table and sighed. She kicked back the footrest and forced her wiry frame out of the recliner.

“Coming.” She whipped open the door, auburn hair springing.

A round silhouette waved a contraption towards her. “Delivery for Mrs. Collingwood.”

Iris blinked in the sunlight and scrutinized the UPS uniform and truck in the drive. “Yes?”

“Sign here, please.” He thrust a package forward. “Good day.”

 * * *

Sheer fabric of emerald, the colour of dreams and desire, lay nestled in cloud-like froth. “Oh!” A heart-shaped card tumbled to the floor.